Matching Items (4)

128037-Thumbnail Image.png

Modeling of multi-band drift in nanowires using a full band Monte Carlo simulation

Description

We report on a new numerical approach for multi-band drift within the context of full band Monte Carlo (FBMC) simulation and apply this to Si and InAs nanowires. The approach

We report on a new numerical approach for multi-band drift within the context of full band Monte Carlo (FBMC) simulation and apply this to Si and InAs nanowires. The approach is based on the solution of the Krieger and Iafrate (KI) equations [J. B. Krieger and G. J. Iafrate, Phys. Rev. B 33, 5494 (1986)], which gives the probability of carriers undergoing interband transitions subject to an applied electric field. The KI equations are based on the solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, and previous solutions of these equations have used Runge-Kutta (RK) methods to numerically solve the KI equations. This approach made the solution of the KI equations numerically expensive and was therefore only applied to a small part of the Brillouin zone (BZ). Here we discuss an alternate approach to the solution of the KI equations using the Magnus expansion (also known as “exponential perturbation theory”). This method is more accurate than the RK method as the solution lies on the exponential map and shares important qualitative properties with the exact solution such as the preservation of the unitary character of the time evolution operator. The solution of the KI equations is then incorporated through a modified FBMC free-flight drift routine and applied throughout the nanowire BZ. The importance of the multi-band drift model is then demonstrated for the case of Si and InAs nanowires by simulating a uniform field FBMC and analyzing the average carrier energies and carrier populations under high electric fields. Numerical simulations show that the average energy of the carriers under high electric field is significantly higher when multi-band drift is taken into consideration, due to the interband transitions allowing carriers to achieve higher energies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-07-29

130266-Thumbnail Image.png

Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

Description

Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The

Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco[superscript ®] Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-06-08

154989-Thumbnail Image.png

Full band Monte Carlo simulation of nanowires and nanowire field effect transistors

Description

In this work, transport in nanowire materials and nanowire field effect transistors is studied using a full band Monte Carlo simulator within the tight binding basis. Chapter 1 is dedicated

In this work, transport in nanowire materials and nanowire field effect transistors is studied using a full band Monte Carlo simulator within the tight binding basis. Chapter 1 is dedicated to the importance of nanowires and nanoscale devices in present day electronics and the necessity to use a computationally efficient tool to simulate transport in these devices. Chapter 2 discusses the calculation of the full band structure of nanowires based on an atomistic tight binding approach, particularly noting the use of the exact same tight binding parameters for bulk band structures as well as the nanowire band structures. Chapter 3 contains the scattering rate formula for deformation potential, polar optical phonon, ionized impurity and impact ionization scattering in nanowires using Fermi’s golden rule and the tight binding basis to describe the wave functions. A method to calculate the dielectric screening in 1D systems within the tight binding basis is also described. Importantly, the scattering rates of nanowires tends to the bulk scattering rates at high energies, enabling the use of the same parameter set that were fitted to bulk experimental data to be used in the simulation of nanowire transport. A robust and efficient method to model interband tunneling is discussed in chapter 4 and its importance in nanowire transport is highlighted. In chapter 5, energy relaxation of excited electrons is studied for free standing nanowires and cladded nanowires. Finally, in chapter 6, a full band Monte Carlo particle based solver is created which treats confinement in a full quantum way and the current voltage characteristics as well as the subthreshold swing and percentage of ballistic transport is analyzed for an In0.7Ga0.3As junctionless nanowire field effect transistor.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

150071-Thumbnail Image.png

Generalized Monte Carlo tool for investigating low-field and high field properties of materials using non-parabolic band structure model

Description

In semiconductor physics, many properties or phenomena of materials can be brought to light through certain changes in the materials. Having a tool to define new material properties so as

In semiconductor physics, many properties or phenomena of materials can be brought to light through certain changes in the materials. Having a tool to define new material properties so as to highlight certain phenomena greatly increases the ability to understand that phenomena. The generalized Monte Carlo tool allows the user to do that by keeping every parameter used to define a material, within the non-parabolic band approximation, a variable in the control of the user. A material is defined by defining its valleys, energies, valley effective masses and their directions. The types of scattering to be included can also be chosen. The non-parabolic band structure model is used. With the deployment of the generalized Monte Carlo tool onto www.nanoHUB.org the tool will be available to users around the world. This makes it a very useful educational tool that can be incorporated into curriculums. The tool is integrated with Rappture, to allow user-friendly access of the tool. The user can freely define a material in an easy systematic way without having to worry about the coding involved. The output results are automatically graphed and since the code incorporates an analytic band structure model, it is relatively fast. The versatility of the tool has been investigated and has produced results closely matching the experimental values for some common materials. The tool has been uploaded onto www.nanoHUB.org by integrating it with the Rappture interface. By using Rappture as the user interface, one can easily make changes to the current parameter sets to obtain even more accurate results.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011