Matching Items (4)

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Yoga as a Means of Stress Reduction in the Homeless Population in Urban Communities: A Feasibility Study

Description

Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility (e.g., practicality and demand) of a 4-week series of yoga classes in a homeless shelter. Participants: Five current

Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility (e.g., practicality and demand) of a 4-week series of yoga classes in a homeless shelter. Participants: Five current residents of Central Arizona Shelter Services (CASS) and the Chief of Programming at CASS. Methods: Each shelter resident participated in a 5-minute interview answering questions regarding the demand of implementing a yoga program at CASS. The Chief of Programming participated in a 30-minute interview answering questions regarding the practicality of implementing a 4-week series yoga program at the homeless shelter. Results: CASS residents reported a strong desire to attend a yoga program. The Chief of Programming at CASS reported that implementing a yoga program would conflict with the overall goal of the shelter. Conclusion: Implementing a 4-week series yoga program is not feasible at CASS although there is a strong demand for a yoga program among the homeless population of the Phoenix metro area.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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How Many Days of Monitoring Predict Physical Activity and Sedentary Behaviour in Older Adults?

Description

Background: The number of days of pedometer or accelerometer data needed to reliably assess physical activity (PA) is important for research that examines the relationship with health. While this important research

Background: The number of days of pedometer or accelerometer data needed to reliably assess physical activity (PA) is important for research that examines the relationship with health. While this important research has been completed in young to middle-aged adults, data is lacking in older adults. Further, data determining the number of days of self-reports PA data is also void. The purpose of this study was to examine the number of days needed to predict habitual PA and sedentary behaviour across pedometer, accelerometer, and physical activity log (PA log) data in older adults.

Methods: Participants (52 older men and women; age = 69.3 ± 7.4 years, range= 55-86 years) wore a Yamax Digiwalker SW-200 pedometer and an ActiGraph 7164 accelerometer while completing a PA log for 21 consecutive days. Mean differences each instrument and intensity between days of the week were examined using separate repeated measures analysis of variance for with pairwise comparisons. Spearman-Brown Prophecy Formulae based on Intraclass Correlations of .80, .85, .90 and .95 were used to predict the number of days of accelerometer or pedometer wear or PA log daily records needed to represent total PA, light PA, moderate-to-vigorous PA, and sedentary behaviour.

Results: Results of this study showed that three days of accelerometer data, four days of pedometer data, or four days of completing PA logs are needed to accurately predict PA levels in older adults. When examining time spent in specific intensities of PA, fewer days of data are needed for accurate prediction of time spent in that activity for ActiGraph but more for the PA log. To accurately predict average daily time spent in sedentary behaviour, five days of ActiGraph data are needed.

Conclusions: The number days of objective (pedometer and ActiGraph) and subjective (PA log) data needed to accurately estimate daily PA in older adults was relatively consistent. Despite no statistical differences between days for total PA by the pedometer and ActiGraph, the magnitude of differences between days suggests that day of the week cannot be completely ignored in the design and analysis of PA studies that involve < 7-day monitoring protocols for these instruments. More days of accelerometer data were needed to determine typical sedentary behaviour than PA level in this population of older adults.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011-06-16

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The Nutritional Disparities Between Students of Differing Socioeconomic Status: An Undergraduate Research Study

Description

Objective: The purpose of this research project was to determine if there are nutritional disparities between students of differing socioeconomic status (SES) households. The SES was determined using school classifications

Objective: The purpose of this research project was to determine if there are nutritional disparities between students of differing socioeconomic status (SES) households. The SES was determined using school classifications (i.e., title one versus non-title one) as a proxy measure. It was hypothesized that children attending a title one school would consume a greater amount of sugary drinks than students attending a non-title one school Participants: The parents/guardians of students in grades 3rd and 4th, from a title one school and from a non-title one school. Methods: The data were gathered from surveys that were sent home to the parents/guardians of the students. The surveys inquired about how many bottles of water, juice boxes, glasses of milk, cans of soda, bottles of Gatorade, and cans of energy drinks their child consumes on a single weekend day. Statistical Analysis: Shapiro Wilk tests were used for normality. Differences in the consumption of sugary drinks were analyzed using the Mann Whitney U test. Results: A total of 150 surveys were returned by students from both schools (n=57 from the title one school; n = 93 from the non-title one school). The results showed a median of 1.00 (IQR=1.25, 4.50) sugary drink for the non-title one school and 3.00 (IQR=0.00, 2.00) sugary drinks for the title one school. The results from the Mann-Whitney U Test showed a significant difference in consumption in sugary drinks between schools (U = 1509.00, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Students attending a title one school consumed a greater amount of sugary drinks than students attending a non-title one school. Parents are a strong contributor to the nutritional diet of children, however students of this age are developing self-efficacy to make their own choices regarding the food and drinks they consume. Researchers can intervene by increasing student and parent knowledge and by researching the effectiveness of instructions based on the new knowledge.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Food As A Means To Treat Anxiety

Description

Anxiety is one of the most common mental illnesses in the United States. In this project, I chose to explore how food is one of the most accessible and inexpensive

Anxiety is one of the most common mental illnesses in the United States. In this project, I chose to explore how food is one of the most accessible and inexpensive ways of treating anxiety. This creative project examines the major key components of gut health including the balance of neurotransmitters and bacteria in the gut, restoring hydrochloric acid through celery juice, removing heavy metal toxins through food, eating fermented foods, and limiting refined carbohydrates, and high-sugar consumption. Additionally, this creative project explores my own personal journey through the implementation of foods that influence anxiety revealed in a systemic review over the course of a 6-week period.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05