Matching Items (5)

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Substance Use Disorder Stigma Reduction among Health Professional Students: Module Development and Implementation in the SHOW Interprofessional Experiential Learning Course

Description

This paper discusses the impact of substance use disorder (SUD) stigma on individuals with substance use disorders and details the development of a SUD Stigma Reduction pilot module for the

This paper discusses the impact of substance use disorder (SUD) stigma on individuals with substance use disorders and details the development of a SUD Stigma Reduction pilot module for the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) affiliated course (HCR 494 Complex Health - Immersion) offered at Arizona State University. This course was designed to educate pre-health professional and health professional students on complex health topics in an interprofessional, experiential-learning environment. The SUD and Stigma module developed in this thesis project provided students with information on SUDs and the opportunity to confront stigma, improving their perceptions on individuals with SUD.

The pilot module on SUD Stigma Reduction was researched, designed, and implemented in the HCR 494 course. After students completed the module, a retrospective pre-post survey was administered to evaluate the effectiveness of the module in two areas: content knowledge and personal perceptions. Only one student responded to the survey, placing limitations on analysis. The student’s response showed a general increase in understanding of the module material, matching the stated objectives, and positive changes in perceptions on people with SUDs. Due to the positive evaluation of the course, the pilot module was deemed successful and has been integrated into the HCR 494 course. Further research is necessary to determine the long term impact of stigma reduction modules in experiential learning courses.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Evaluation of an Interprofessional Model of Healthcare Delivery in the SHOW Community Initiative

Description

Over the past seven years, the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) Community Initiative has served vulnerable populations in Maricopa County through a volunteer workforce of providers, graduate health professional

Over the past seven years, the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) Community Initiative has served vulnerable populations in Maricopa County through a volunteer workforce of providers, graduate health professional students, and undergraduates from all three of Arizona’s public universities. With an interprofessional volunteer base, SHOW has managed to transition its health education and screenings from a clinic-based setting to community-based settings. These new clinical outreach programs within SHOW present unique challenges to maintaining the integrity of interprofessional, team-based care, and new evaluative tools are needed to provide feedback for improvement. Now, as a pioneer site for the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, SHOW must continue to conduct internal research to evaluate their innovative model of care. For this project, the four core competency domains for interprofessional collaborative practice were used to outline proposals for the implementation of several new evaluative measures: the Assessment for Collaborative Environments (ACE-15), the Interprofessional Collaborative Competencies Attainment Survey (ICCAS), patient satisfaction surveys, and critical incident reporting. These tools and protocols are necessary to solidify SHOW as a national model for interprofessional education and practice.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Health education programming for individuals experiencing homelessness utilizing the Health Belief Model.

Description

The Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) is a free, student-led interprofessional clinic and community outreach initiative that aims to serve individuals experiencing homelessness in Phoenix, AZ. Individuals experiencing homelessness

The Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) is a free, student-led interprofessional clinic and community outreach initiative that aims to serve individuals experiencing homelessness in Phoenix, AZ. Individuals experiencing homelessness face many situational and financial barriers to finding healthcare. In order to better understand these barriers, a community needs assessment (CNA) was conducted in Fall 2014 on the Human Services Campus (HSC), a hub of resources for the population. Results indicated chronic disease is moderately prevalent (37.21% and 27.91% reported obesity and hypertension, respectively, among others). Since chronic diseases can lead to more severe health issues, it is imperative to address, manage, and avoid these conditions. Health education programs are a key component of the SHOW clinic model and a means to address chronic disease. The Health Belief Model (HBM) is a theory-based behavior change model used in programs to increase patient adherence to and promotion of preventative health behaviors. SHOW health education programs will use the constructs of this model to inform program development. Since many student volunteers are not well-versed in health education literature, a SHOW Program Development Guide based on the HBM has been created. The guide will help ensure SHOW delivers high-quality and efficacious programs that have a long-lasting impact on patients now and as the organization continues to grow.

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Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Evaluating Structural Barriers to Quality Care in the SHOW Free Clinic

Description

Homelessness is a pervasive in American society. The causes of homelessness are complex, but health and homelessness are inextricably linked. Student-run free clinics care for underserved populations, including people experiencing

Homelessness is a pervasive in American society. The causes of homelessness are complex, but health and homelessness are inextricably linked. Student-run free clinics care for underserved populations, including people experiencing homelessness, but they have multiple agendas—to provide care but also to give students hands-on experience. It is plausible that these two agendas may compete and give patients sub-par quality of care.
This study examines patient care in the SHOW free clinic in Phoenix, Arizona, which serves adults experiencing homelessness. This study asks two questions: First, do clinicians in Phoenix’s SHOW free clinic discuss with patients how to pay for and where to access follow-up services and medications? Second, how do the backgrounds of patients, measured by scales based on the Gelberg-Anderson behavioral model for vulnerable populations, correlate with patient outcomes, including number of unmet needs in clinic, patient satisfaction with care, and patient perceived health status? To answer these questions, structured surveys were administered to SHOW clinic patients at the end of their visits. Results were analyzed using Pearson’s correlations and odds ratios. 21 patients completed the survey over four weeks in February-March 2017. We did not identify any statistically significant correlations between predisposing factors such as severity/duration of homelessness, mental health history, ethnicity, or LGBTQ status and quality of care outcomes. Twenty nine percent of surveyed patients reported having one or more unmet needs following their SHOW clinic visit suggesting an important area for future research. The results from this study indicate that measuring unmet needs is a feasible alternative to patient satisfaction surveys for assessing quality of care in student-run free clinics for homeless populations.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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COMMUNITY NEEDS ASSESSMENT FOR SHOW DETERMINING THE HEALTH STATUS AND RISK FACTORS OF PERSONS EXPERIENCING HOMELESS IN MARICOPA COUNTY

Description

Introduction/Purpose: This paper describes the process of the community needs assessment phase of program implementation for the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) clinic. Homeless individuals are more likely (than

Introduction/Purpose: This paper describes the process of the community needs assessment phase of program implementation for the Student Health Outreach for Wellness (SHOW) clinic. Homeless individuals are more likely (than non homeless individuals) to experience serious illness, depression and mental illness. Access to health care has been identified as a barrier to receiving appropriate health care to manage the diseases and conditions clients may have. SHOW's vision is to operate on Saturdays utilizing Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) to offer extended primary health care hours, along with offering health promotion programming to address the biopsychosocial components of their health. Ultimately, this aims to reduce the homeless population's need to visit emergency room departments for non- urgent, primary care visits. Methods: To validate the need for this clinic's operation of programming and health services, a community needs assessment was conducted to collect data about the population's current health status. Forty-three people (n=43) ages 20-76 (M = 44.87) were surveyed by a trained research team using interview questionnaires. Results: The results show a prevalence of self\u2014reported physical and behavioral conditions, and support that this population would benefit from extended hours of care. Mental and behavioral health conditions are the most prevalent conditions (with the highest rates of depression (41.86%) and anxiety disorder (32.56%)), followed by the common cold (23.36%) and back pain (16.28%). The average reported emergency department (ED) visits within the past six months was 1.18 times. Almost everyone surveyed would visit a free medical clinic on the Human Services Campus (HSC) staffed by health staff and health professional students on the weekends (93.18%). Conclusion: Overall, the community needs assessment conducted for SHOW supports the need for weekend access to health care facilities and an interest in health programming for this population.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05