Matching Items (6)

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Knowledge of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and HPV Vaccination Intent: The Adolescent Perspective

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Human papilloma virus infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US. This study aimed to examine (A) how adolescents’ HPV-related knowledge and vaccination intent differ by biological

Human papilloma virus infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US. This study aimed to examine (A) how adolescents’ HPV-related knowledge and vaccination intent differ by biological sex, age, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status; (B) the relationship between social media use and health information seeking among adolescents; and (C) how HPV-related knowledge, biological sex, age, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status influence their vaccination intent particularly among adolescents who use social media.

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  • 2020-05

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Consistency in Childhood Temperament

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This study was conducted to determine how consistently parents rated their child's temperament regarding taking them places, how easy or difficult it is to soothe them, how easily they get

This study was conducted to determine how consistently parents rated their child's temperament regarding taking them places, how easy or difficult it is to soothe them, how easily they get upset, and how much they want to be held. The questionnaires were distributed, and the 55 participants were given time to complete them. After being returned the data was analyzed and it was found that parents rate their children's temperament consistently throughout the questionnaire. Children who were rated as having a more challenging temperament in some questions tended to be related as having a challenging temperament in all areas, while children who were rated as having a more positive temperament in some questions were related as having a positive temperament in all areas. The results showed that analyzing different characteristics that a child shows throughout daily life can be used to determine that child’s temperament.

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  • 2020-05

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HPV and Vaccination: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Intention among Chinese International College Students

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Introduction. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infections globally. HPV is responsible for several health concerns including genital warts, cancer of the cervix, vulva, penis, anus, and

Introduction. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infections globally. HPV is responsible for several health concerns including genital warts, cancer of the cervix, vulva, penis, anus, and oropharynx. In China, HPV infection accounts for 69.1% of invasive cervical cancer. Currently, there is no treatment for HPV infection, but HPV vaccination has been proven to be effective against HPV-related diseases. Given the highest rate of contracting HPV and suboptimal vaccination rate in college students including international students in the U.S., it is important to investigate key factors associated with vaccine uptake among Chinese international students. Purpose. This study aimed to investigate knowledge and awareness of HPV and the vaccine, attitudes, and vaccination intention in this population. We conducted a cross-sectional online survey via REDCap. Methods. Participants who were (1) Chinese international student at Arizona State University; (2) 18 and older; (3) able to read, speak and write in Chinese or English were recruited from Arizona State University. Descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, frequency) and inferential statistics (Chi-square test, independent t-test) were conducted using SPSS 26.0. Results. One hundred and ten participants were included in this study (56.4% female, mean age = 24, SD = 3.7). Female students had significantly higher HPV vaccination rate than males (p = 0.000). The mean knowledge score was 8.09 (SD = 1.35); female students were more likely to receive HPV education than males (p = 0.001). The most common source of education was friends (50.7%). Three most common perceived risks were not being sexually active, being male, and not having any physical signs and symptoms. The three most common facilitators were infection prevention, access to vaccination, and ability to afford vaccination. The three most common barriers were the cost, safety, and efficacy of HPV vaccine. In conclusion, gender disparities exist among Chinese<br/>international students’ HPV vaccine uptake and HPV related education. Implication. Although Chinese international students possess moderate to high level of knowledge about HPV and HPV vaccines, they lack education from credible sources. Culturally and gender appropriate education is needed in order to address barriers of getting HPV vaccination.

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  • 2021-05

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College Students' Perceived Risk of COVID-19 Infection, Protective Behaviors, and Vaccination Intent

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“College Students' Perceived Risk of COVID-19 Infection, Protective Behaviors, and Vaccination Intent” is a thesis project based on research conducted from the end of 2020 to the beginning of 2021.

“College Students' Perceived Risk of COVID-19 Infection, Protective Behaviors, and Vaccination Intent” is a thesis project based on research conducted from the end of 2020 to the beginning of 2021. This project investigated various protective behavior factors against the Coronavirus (COVID-19) based on gender, race/ethnicity, and financial difficulty of college students in the United States. The plan for this thesis project was to send out two surveys through Amazon Mturk to a group of 500 college students. The first survey further narrowed down the sample size to include only the participants who met the eligibility factors. A second larger survey was sent to this sample which included the data for this research project. This paper will explore the topics of perceived risk of becoming infected with COVID-19, preventive behaviors, vaccination intent based on gender, race/ethnicity, and financial difficulty.

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  • 2021-05

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The Effect of an HPV Educational Video on HPV Vaccination Intent Among Young Adults in the United States

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The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the comprehensive HPV educational video, “What is HPV?” on the vaccination intent of young adults. The study also aimed

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the comprehensive HPV educational video, “What is HPV?” on the vaccination intent of young adults. The study also aimed to collect information regarding knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs that influence vaccination and related health behaviors. The sample included 215 participants between the ages of 18-26 who had not received any HPV vaccine, were able to read and comprehend English, and had consented for participation through Amazon Mechanical Turk. After they completed the baseline survey (T0), participants were randomly assigned to two study conditions. The intervention group (n = 104) watched the “What is HPV?” video, and the control group (n = 111) read the CDC HPV Fact Sheet. Both groups then completed a post-intervention survey (T1). The analysis results show that the vaccination intent among participants in the intervention group significantly increased following the intervention (59.6% to 71.2%), while vaccination intent significantly decreased for the control group (65.8% to 55%) following the intervention. The results also show a significant difference in the changes in vaccination intent for the two intervention groups. The most change in vaccination intent following the intervention came from the group who was undecided in the initial survey. The findings of the study suggested that a brief HPV educational video that provides the most updated evidence while using non-stigmatizing language and tone has the potential to increase young adults’ vaccination intent to prevent HPV-related cancers and diseases. The findings also suggested that effective HPV education is key to combating negative attitudes and misinformation about HPV vaccines.

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  • 2021-05

COVID-19 and College Students: The Relationships among Fear of COVID-19, Preventative Behaviors, & Vaccination Intention

Description

Objective: This study looked at three key variables of fear of COVID-19, preventative behaviors, and vaccination intent among college students in the United Sates. In addition, the three key variables

Objective: This study looked at three key variables of fear of COVID-19, preventative behaviors, and vaccination intent among college students in the United Sates. In addition, the three key variables were compared between genders, age groups, race groups, and over time to see if there were any significant findings. <br/>Method: This longitudinal study consisted of two anonymous online surveys administered on REDCap before and after a COVID-19 vaccine became available. <br/>Results: The findings suggested positive correlations between students’ fear of COVID-19 and their preventative behaviors with the passing of time. Hispanic/Latino participants had significantly higher fear of COVID-19 scores compared to Non-Hispanic Whites and other races at Wave I and II. Participants between 25 and 30 years old had a marginally greater difference fear of COVID-19 score compared to those less than 25. Females had significantly higher mean preventative behavior score than males at Wave II. There was a significant association between race/ethnicity groups and vaccination intent. <br/>Conclusion: Knowing why different groups do not engage in recommended preventative behaviors or receive vaccinations can tell us more about what tailored interventions may need to be developed and implemented to promote health and wellbeing in this population. Further research needs to be done regarding race, gender, and age and how these different groups of college students are responding to COVID-19 and why.

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  • 2021-05