Matching Items (40)

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From Civilian to Soldier: Factors Influencing Military Enlistment

Description

There are various motivational factors that affect both enlistment and retention success in the military. The purpose of this study was to identify those factors, their influence on enlistment rates,

There are various motivational factors that affect both enlistment and retention success in the military. The purpose of this study was to identify those factors, their influence on enlistment rates, and to determine if there is an all-encompassing personality type characteristics of individuals who choose to enlist. Nineteen studies were identified that looked at one or more potential motivational factors. In total, these studies contained roughly 95,226 participants including men, women, Caucasians, African-Americans, and Hispanics. Other minority groups were looked at in these studies, however, their sample sizes were too small for any conclusions to be drawn. The population samples ranged from high school seniors who were about to make the decision between the armed forces and alternative paths to those who had recently enlisted. Participants were from across all branches of the military. Overall, there were six main categories of motivational factors that appeared to be the most influential on one's decision to enlist in the armed forces. These include benefits offered by the military, educational aspirations and achievements of the potential enlistee, one's socioeconomic status, social influences, family influence, and the potential recruit's own personality. Finally, apart from motivational factors, the standards for enlistment imposed by the different military branches also affect who can enlist. In general, these six factors seem to be the most influential, although the specific patterns of motivational factors underlying one's enlistment decision are likely as unique as the enlistees themselves.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Political Apathy: Understanding Disinterest in the U.S. Political Sphere

Description

The following research seeks to understand the increase in political disengagement, or political apathy, in younger generations of American citizens, with political apathy defined as disinterest and/or lack of caring

The following research seeks to understand the increase in political disengagement, or political apathy, in younger generations of American citizens, with political apathy defined as disinterest and/or lack of caring to vote, advocate, or engage in topics or actions affiliated with politics. Given the historical roots of the U.S. and the struggle of many individuals to gain and hold on to the rights to vote and advocate in the political sphere, it is somewhat puzzling that political apathy is on the rise. Hence, I pose the question of why younger voters, in particular, are disinterested in politics. In doing so, I explore past historical events that correlate with decreases in voter turnout that may have also influenced the start of political apathy. Additionally, I adopt an interdisciplinary lens that draws on the political philosophy of Thomas Hobbes and Karl Marx, the writings of Sigmund Freud, and more current research from the psychological literature on attitudes and associations and from political science. A broader aim of this paper is to increase awareness of political apathy and the potential consequences that younger and future generations may face, as a result.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Language Barriers in Medical Encounters

Description

The thesis examines the intricacies involved with the language barriers experienced by patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in medical encounters in the U.S. It examines the evidence showing the

The thesis examines the intricacies involved with the language barriers experienced by patients with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) in medical encounters in the U.S. It examines the evidence showing the impact that language barriers have on both the quality of care and the satisfaction with care experienced by patients with LEP. It also presents an overview of the laws regulating these interactions and its limitations. It further examines the pros and cons of the use of interpreters as the primary strategy developed to operationalize these regulations, including lack of funding for medical interpreters, lack of appropriate training and certification, and language diversity. Additionally, language barriers are examined in the context of cultural differences that permeate all social encounters. One key finding of this review is that communication problems are not only an issue for the LEP population, providing health-care for all patients involve sharing information among multiple health-care providers, patients and their families. However, it is well-documented that LEP makes health-care communication exponentially more challenging. The work concludes with some possible solutions to improve the quality of care and satisfaction of patients with LEP.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Am I a Feminist?: Discussing Self-Identity of Latina College Women Through the Lens of Feminist Theory

Description

This thesis project had three key components. First, we performed an extensive literature review of different types of feminist theories to better understand the scope of their definitions. We also

This thesis project had three key components. First, we performed an extensive literature review of different types of feminist theories to better understand the scope of their definitions. We also reviewed several articles that examined how women, especially Latinas, seek to understand and negotiate their identity as feminists. Second, we conducted qualitative interviews with Latina college women in which they shared their college experiences, their thoughts on feminism, and how they believe the cultural values they were brought up with play a role in both. Finally, we developed a 12-minute documentary film containing excerpts from participants’ interviews that reflected a number of core themes. We invited participants to view the documentary and contribute to a post-film conversation with interested faculty members and students. The interactive post-film conversation served as a reflection and expansion of the themes in the film and challenged those that participated to explore avenues of resolution through family and communication.
The motivation for this project came from a place of reflection for what it means to be a feminist and Latina and how to navigate the values of both without compromising one over the other. After personally contemplating the meanings and process without coming to a concrete understanding, we were prompted to branch out and engage other Latina college students in a conversation about what it means for them, what unique challenges they may be facing, and how they may be seeking to answer questions surrounding their identity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Becoming a Parent: An Analysis of Romantic Relationship Conflict, Self-esteem, and Mental Health

Description

Numerous studies have established that during the transition to parenthood couples experience changes within their relationship as well as in their overall mental health. The present study examines these changes

Numerous studies have established that during the transition to parenthood couples experience changes within their relationship as well as in their overall mental health. The present study examines these changes specifically through conflict interactions. The author proposes the more conflict that occurs within a relationship, the lower each individual's self-esteem; the lowered self-esteem then leads to signs of depression. The present study's analysis consisted of two primary aims: 1) examine the association between romantic relationship conflict and mental health by using a proposed mediational pathway, in which self-esteem explains the connection, and 2) explore gender differences. The study aims were examined using secondary data analyses of Dr. Kristin Mickelson's study on couples transitioning to parenthood (Baby TIME Study). Results varied by conflict type as well as gender. When conflict was measured by perceived negative spousal interactions, results showed that the proposed mediational pathway was significant for men, but not for women. When conflict was measured by frequency of spousal arguments, results showed that the proposed mediational pathway was significant for women, but not for men. Furthermore, the results from this analysis indicate that during the transition to parenthood, men and women are affected by conflict differently in regards to their self-esteem and further their reported levels of depression.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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The Effect of Offender Gender and Sexual Orientation on Prosecutors' Reactions to Juvenile Sex Offense Cases

Description

The objective of this study was to determine whether prosecutors would be more inclined to prosecute a juvenile sex offense case when the offender is gay versus straight. I also

The objective of this study was to determine whether prosecutors would be more inclined to prosecute a juvenile sex offense case when the offender is gay versus straight. I also tested whether the effect of offender sexual orientation would be different for male versus female juvenile offenders. Based on previous research showing leniency toward lesbian juvenile sex offenders among laypeople, I hypothesized that prosecutors would be more likely to prosecute a case in which the offender was gay instead of heterosexual—but only if they were boys. In contrast, if the offenders were lesbians, I hypothesized that prosecutors would be less inclined to prosecute, compared to heterosexual girls. Based on survey data, I found that prosecutors’ decisions to prosecute were not affected by the offender’s gender or sexuality, but their impressions of the offender were. Prosecutors perceived males to be more likely to recidivate than females. Specifically, gay males were perceived as more likely to recidivate than heterosexual males; however the difference between lesbians and heterosexuals were nearly indistinguishable. Prosecutors also viewed gay males as having more negative attributes than heterosexual males. Contrarily, lesbian girls were perceived as having slightly less negative attributes than heterosexual girls. Still, females overall were perceived as having less negative attributes than males. These impressions on recidivism and negative attributes were important because they both positively correlated with the prosecutor’s decision to prosecute the case.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Fido Helped Me with My Homework: Emotional Support Animals and Stress Levels in College Students

Description

We have seen the joy pets bring into people’s lives, and the sadness that follows the loss of them. Many pet owners view their pets as more than just animals:

We have seen the joy pets bring into people’s lives, and the sadness that follows the loss of them. Many pet owners view their pets as more than just animals: they are family. They offer a level of love and support similar to friends and family, despite not being human. Some pets are also trained as service animals to assist humans who struggle with diagnosed physical, mental, and other disabilities. However, emotional support animals appear to lie somewhere between pets and service animals, as there are rules and policies still developing around them. With more and more college students requesting to bring ESAs on campus, the question of their effectiveness has been raised. The aim of this honors thesis study is to examine the effectiveness of ESAs in alleviating mental health symptoms in college students. More specifically, I wanted to evaluate students who currently live on campus (or have lived on campus in the past). The first aim will be to determine whether non-pet owners versus ESA owners (and pet owners in general) show a difference in their stress levels. The second aim is to examine if owning a pet or ESA predicts stress levels differently between genders. The final aim of the study is to determine if degree of attachment to pets predicts differences in stress in the owners.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Marketing to Millennials: The Moderating Effect of Construal Levels on Hedonic vs. Utilitarian Products

Description

As millennials are growing and becoming the "the next big consumer market," understanding them is crucial (Paul, 2001; Kumar & Lim, 2008). This study will attempt to understand their processing

As millennials are growing and becoming the "the next big consumer market," understanding them is crucial (Paul, 2001; Kumar & Lim, 2008). This study will attempt to understand their processing of ads by observing the relationship between construal level theory and product type (i.e. hedonic vs. utilitarian). Construal Level theory suggests that individuals construe information at different abstract levels. High levels are characterized by abstract and general representation (e.g. thinking of moving as starting a new chapter of life) while low levels are characterized as including more concrete and contextual details (e.g. thinking of moving as packing boxes). Neither interaction nor main effect of product type was observed either as main effect or as interaction with construal level. However, a significant main effect of construal level was found showing that concrete and contextual (low construal level) information on advertisements makes them more effective and useful to millennials; influences purchase intentions more than ads construed in high construal levels; and, makes brands seem more credible, stable and truthful.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Perceived Stigma in Interracial/Interethnic Couples and their Family Relationships

Description

The research study that I conducted is on perceived stigma in interracial/interethnic couples and its impact on family relationships. With the growing number of interracial/interethnic couples in the United States

The research study that I conducted is on perceived stigma in interracial/interethnic couples and its impact on family relationships. With the growing number of interracial/interethnic couples in the United States and the current climate regarding racism in United States, I am interested in examining how the stigma that interracial couples face impacts their relationship satisfaction and quality, as well as their relationship with family members. The study examines perceived stigma both internalized and experienced among individuals who have felt racially discriminated because of their interracial relationship by their family and their partner's family. Thus, the current study focused on whether perceived stigma in interracial couples impacts their family relationships which ultimately is associated with their relationship satisfaction.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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ActionPoint: Bringing Together Computer Science and Psychology to Design an App to Prevent Cyberbullying

Description

Over the past several decades, cyberbullying has increasingly become one of the most dangerous threats to an adolescent’s mental health. Heather Springer, writing for the American Psychological Association, projects that

Over the past several decades, cyberbullying has increasingly become one of the most dangerous threats to an adolescent’s mental health. Heather Springer, writing for the American Psychological Association, projects that roughly 33% of American teenagers are affected by cyberbullying while on social media (Springer). This startling percentage, compounded by an escalating need to combat cyberbullying’s negative impact on mental health, has catalyzed a wave of psychological research to explore the ways in which social media impacts teens. Over the years, researchers have produced a plethora of publications on the subject, inspiring families to pursue cyberbullying prevention for their loved ones. However, despite this surge in anti-cyberbullying interest, few researchers have attempted to coalesce these psychological findings with computer applications, and fewer still have sought to prevent cyberbullying through the strengthening of parent-teen relationships (Silva et al., 2019). Because of this, the BullyBlocker team, led by Dr. Yasin Silva and Dr. Deborah Hall, has spent the past couple years developing a mobile application called ActionPoint. Our team hopes that through this app, the risk of cyberbullying is drastically decreased and even prevented.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05