Matching Items (4)

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Reallocating bouted sedentary time to non-bouted sedentary time, light activity and moderate-vigorous physical activity in adults with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes

Description

Aim
The aim of this study was to investigate the potential associations of reallocating 30 minutes sedentary time in long bouts (>60 min) to sedentary time in non-bouts, light intensity

Aim
The aim of this study was to investigate the potential associations of reallocating 30 minutes sedentary time in long bouts (>60 min) to sedentary time in non-bouts, light intensity physical activity (LPA) and moderate- to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with cardiometabolic risk factors in a population diagnosed with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes.
Methods
Participants diagnosed with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes (n = 124, 50% men, mean [SD] age = 63.8 [7.5] years) were recruited to the physical activity intervention Sophia Step Study. For this study baseline data was used with a cross-sectional design. Time spent in sedentary behaviors in bouts (>60 min) and non-bouts (accrued in <60 min bouts) and physical activity was measured using the ActiGraph GT1M. Associations of reallocating bouted sedentary time to non-bouted sedentary time, LPA and MVPA with cardiometabolic risk factors were examined using an isotemporal substitution framework with linear regression models.
Results
Reallocating 30 minutes sedentary time in bouts to MVPA was associated with lower waist circumference (b = -4.30 95% CI:-7.23, -1.38 cm), lower BMI (b = -1.46 95% CI:-2.60, -0.33 kg/m2) and higher HDL cholesterol levels (b = 0.11 95% CI: 0.02, 0.21 kg/m[superscript 2]. Similar associations were seen for reallocation of sedentary time in non-bouts to MVPA. Reallocating sedentary time in bouts to LPA was associated only with lower waist circumference.
Conclusion
Reallocation of sedentary time in bouts as well as non-bouts to MVPA, but not to LPA, was beneficially associated with waist circumference, BMI and HDL cholesterol in individuals with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The results of this study confirm the importance of reallocation sedentary time to MVPA.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-07-28

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Physical activity promotion in the primary care setting in pre- and type 2 diabetes - the Sophia step study, an RCT

Description

Background
Physical activity prevents or delays progression of impaired glucose tolerance in high-risk individuals. Physical activity promotion should serve as a basis in diabetes care. It is necessary to develo

Background
Physical activity prevents or delays progression of impaired glucose tolerance in high-risk individuals. Physical activity promotion should serve as a basis in diabetes care. It is necessary to develop and evaluate health-promoting methods that are feasible as well as cost-effective within diabetes care. The aim of Sophia Step Study is to evaluate the impact of a multi-component and a single component physical activity intervention aiming at improving HbA[subscript 1c] (primary outcome) and other metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, physical activity levels and overall health in patients with pre- and type 2 diabetes.
Methods/design
Sophia Step Study is a randomized controlled trial and participants are randomly assigned to either a multi-component intervention group (A), a pedometer group (B) or a control group (C). In total, 310 patients will be included and followed for 24 months. Group A participants are offered pedometers and a website to register steps, physical activity on prescription with yearly follow-ups, motivational interviewing (10 occasions) and group consultations (including walks, 12 occasions). Group B participants are offered pedometers and a website to register steps. Group C are offered usual care. The theoretical framework underpinning the interventions is the Health Belief Model, the Stages of Change Model, and the Social Cognitive Theory. Both the multi-component intervention (group A) and the pedometer intervention (group B) are using several techniques for behavior change such as self-monitoring, goal setting, feedback and relapse prevention.
Measurements are made at week 0, 8, 12, 16, month 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24, including metabolic and cardiovascular biomarkers (HbA[subscript 1c] as primary health outcome), accelerometry and daily steps. Furthermore, questionnaires were used to evaluate dietary intake, physical activity, perceived ability to perform physical activity, perceived support for being active, quality of life, anxiety, depression, well-being, perceived treatment, perceived stress and diabetes self- efficacy.
Discussion
This study will show if a multi-component intervention using pedometers with group- and individual consultations is more effective than a single- component intervention using pedometers alone, in increasing physical activity and improving HbA[subscript 1c], other metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, physical activity levels and overall health in patients with pre- and type 2 diabetes.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-07-12

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Perceived neighborhood environment and physical activity in 11 countries: Do associations differ by country?

Description

Background
Increasing empirical evidence supports associations between neighborhood environments and physical activity. However, since most studies were conducted in a single country, particularly western countries, the generalizability of associations in

Background
Increasing empirical evidence supports associations between neighborhood environments and physical activity. However, since most studies were conducted in a single country, particularly western countries, the generalizability of associations in an international setting is not well understood. The current study examined whether associations between perceived attributes of neighborhood environments and physical activity differed by country.
Methods
Population representative samples from 11 countries on five continents were surveyed using comparable methodologies and measurement instruments. Neighborhood environment × country interactions were tested in logistic regression models with meeting physical activity recommendations as the outcome, adjusted for demographic characteristics. Country-specific associations were reported.
Results
Significant neighborhood environment attribute × country interactions implied some differences across countries in the association of each neighborhood attribute with meeting physical activity recommendations. Across the 11 countries, land-use mix and sidewalks had the most consistent associations with physical activity. Access to public transit, bicycle facilities, and low-cost recreation facilities had some associations with physical activity, but with less consistency across countries. There was little evidence supporting the associations of residential density and crime-related safety with physical activity in most countries.
Conclusion
There is evidence of generalizability for the associations of land use mix, and presence of sidewalks with physical activity. Associations of other neighborhood characteristics with physical activity tended to differ by country. Future studies should include objective measures of neighborhood environments, compare psychometric properties of reports across countries, and use better specified models to further understand the similarities and differences in associations across countries.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05-14

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Patterns of neighborhood environment attributes related to physical activity across 11 countries: a latent class analysis

Description

Background
Neighborhood environment studies of physical activity (PA) have been mainly single-country focused. The International Prevalence Study (IPS) presented a rare opportunity to examine neighborhood features across countries. The purpose

Background
Neighborhood environment studies of physical activity (PA) have been mainly single-country focused. The International Prevalence Study (IPS) presented a rare opportunity to examine neighborhood features across countries. The purpose of this analysis was to: 1) detect international neighborhood typologies based on participants’ response patterns to an environment survey and 2) to estimate associations between neighborhood environment patterns and PA.
Methods
A Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was conducted on pooled IPS adults (N=11,541) aged 18 to 64 years old (mean=37.5 ±12.8 yrs; 55.6% women) from 11 countries including Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Colombia, Hong Kong, Japan, Lithuania, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, and the U.S. This subset used the Physical Activity Neighborhood Environment Survey (PANES) that briefly assessed 7 attributes within 10–15 minutes walk of participants’ residences, including residential density, access to shops/services, recreational facilities, public transit facilities, presence of sidewalks and bike paths, and personal safety. LCA derived meaningful subgroups from participants’ response patterns to PANES items, and participants were assigned to neighborhood types. The validated short-form International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) measured likelihood of meeting the 150 minutes/week PA guideline. To validate derived classes, meeting the guideline either by walking or total PA was regressed on neighborhood types using a weighted generalized linear regression model, adjusting for gender, age and country.
Results
A 5-subgroup solution fitted the dataset and was interpretable. Neighborhood types were labeled, “Overall Activity Supportive (52% of sample)”, “High Walkable and Unsafe with Few Recreation Facilities (16%)”, “Safe with Active Transport Facilities (12%)”, “Transit and Shops Dense with Few Amenities (15%)”, and “Safe but Activity Unsupportive (5%)”. Country representation differed by type (e.g., U.S. disproportionally represented “Safe but Activity Unsupportive”). Compared to the Safe but Activity Unsupportive, two types showed greater odds of meeting PA guideline for walking outcome (High Walkable and Unsafe with Few Recreation Facilities, OR= 2.26 (95% CI 1.18-4.31); Overall Activity Supportive, OR= 1.90 (95% CI 1.13-3.21). Significant but smaller odds ratios were also found for total PA.
Conclusions
Meaningful neighborhood patterns generalized across countries and explained practical differences in PA. These observational results support WHO/UN recommendations for programs and policies targeted to improve features of the neighborhood environment for PA.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-03-07