Matching Items (7)

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Evaluating the cultural competency of Family Check-Up 4 Health and the role of cross-sector collaboration in eliminating perceived barriers

Description

FCU4Health is an adaption of an evidence-based program to address the pediatric obesity epidemic in the United States. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nine program providers to understand possible cultural variation in family engagement with the program. Interviews were coded

FCU4Health is an adaption of an evidence-based program to address the pediatric obesity epidemic in the United States. Qualitative interviews were conducted with nine program providers to understand possible cultural variation in family engagement with the program. Interviews were coded to develop a scheme that identifies themes among the coordinators’ experiences through a grounded theory approach, narrowing the scope of topics discussed to create a specific theoretical framework that integrates categories of coordinator experiences. Results showed that the prioritization of what families’ needs are and what resources/parenting modules coordinators utilize followed Maslow's hierarchy of needs, putting child health and safety at the forefront. Barriers to family engagement with the program and with coordinator recommendations are largely cross-cultural and socioeconomic in nature due to not having enough time to follow-through with work/family obligations. However, there were some specific cultural groups such as Latino multigenerational families and immigration status that did pose similar barriers across multiple families that allowed for more generalized themes for those particular cultural groups. Other individualized case studies presented by coordinators showed nuances in barriers to resource utilization between cultural groups at the familial level. In addition, multiple coordinators stated that their most successful resources in engaging families have come with resources that have collaborations with other organizations. In order to address the barriers to accessing health-related services for low-income families that are disproportionately individuals of minority cultural groups, it is vital to have cross-sector collaboration as a mindset towards finding effective and all-encompassing resources for these vulnerable individuals. The non-profit, public, and private sector each have unique strengths that can contribute to reducing health disparities for those suffering with pediatric obesity.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

Encouraging Social Impact through a Connected Growth Platform

Description

For my Barrett the Honors College senior thesis project, I decided to utilize my knowledge of curriculum design to create a set of learning Modules. I was influenced by my involvement in the Next Generation Service Corps to create these

For my Barrett the Honors College senior thesis project, I decided to utilize my knowledge of curriculum design to create a set of learning Modules. I was influenced by my involvement in the Next Generation Service Corps to create these Modules around college student community impact. In the end I developed 6 Modules, each with 4-5 lessons and activities that focused on topics such as volunteerism, civic engagement, and meaningful careers. With interviews rolling through during the design process, I was able to iterate my design as I built it. The design was tested with 14 college students with positive feedback and engagement during the week-long period that it was available. Through this research and design, I found that such a collection of Modules could be beneficial to students to excite them about their potential and educate them about the opportunities that exist for them to take advantage of. This research could serve as a useful tool within the ASU community as an opportunity for the students to build up meaningful skills to create impact. ASU is passionate about education translating into real world applications and creating “changemakers”, and this collection has the opportunity to do just that.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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The E-Commerce Window for Economic Development: Analyzing the Earning Capacities for Low-Income Households

Description

The United States has a long-standing history of income and wealth inequality that create barriers for individuals to escape from poverty. When a family is in poverty, children in the household are likely to grow up experiencing educational and skill

The United States has a long-standing history of income and wealth inequality that create barriers for individuals to escape from poverty. When a family is in poverty, children in the household are likely to grow up experiencing educational and skill inequity. This establishes the beginning of the cycle of poverty which is a complex issue that is caused by a combination of factors or events which can affect all aspects of an individual’s life. Research suggests poverty is driven by the following root causes: family breakdown, educational failure, worklessness and dependency, addiction, and personal debt (The Centre for Social Justice). While these factors can be seen as interrelated factors affecting a family’s socioeconomic standing, this paper focuses specifically on addressing the worklessness and dependency aspect of poverty.
Work is recognized as one of the most effective routes out of poverty. I set out to research how side hustles or gigs can impact the financial standing of low-income families and get a better understanding of requirements to engage in these types of work. The research conducted in this project aims to identify potential side hustles that low-income earners can engage in without needing to make a large capital investment. The project findings will help readers get a better understanding of various side hustles available and learn how additional earnings can help individuals build, grow, and maintain capital.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Burn, Baby, Burn: the Centralia Mine Fire

Description

The Centralia Council, representative of a small Pennsylvania borough, arranged for an illegal controlled burn of the Centralia landfill in late May 1962. It happened the same way every year. As Memorial Day drew closer, the Council contracted volunteer firefighters

The Centralia Council, representative of a small Pennsylvania borough, arranged for an illegal controlled burn of the Centralia landfill in late May 1962. It happened the same way every year. As Memorial Day drew closer, the Council contracted volunteer firefighters to burn the top layer of refuse in the landfill in preparation for the day’s festivities, but intentionally burning landfills violated state law. A tangle of events over the years saw the “controlled” burn develop into an underground mine fire and then into a coal seam fire. Excavation costs lie far beyond the state’s budget, and Pennsylvania plans to let the fire burn until its natural end--anticipated at another 240 years. The tangled mess of poor decisions over 21 years begs one question: did the people or the fire kill Centralia?

This paper’s field of study falls into the cross section of geology and fire science, history, social conflict, public service ethics, and collaborative failures. I explore how a series of small choices snowballed into a full, government funded relocation effort after attempts at controlling the anthracite coal seam fire failed. Geology and fire science worked in tandem during the mine fire, influencing each other and complicating the firefighting efforts. The fire itself was a unique challenge. The history of Centralia played a large role in the government and community response efforts. I use the borough and regional history to contextualize the social conflict that divided Centralia. Social conflict impaired the community’s ability to unify and form a therapeutic community, and in turn, it damaged community-government relationships. The government agencies involved in the mine fire response did their own damage to community relationships by pursuing their own interests. Agencies worried about their brand image, and politicians worried about re-election. I study how these ethical failures impacted the situation. Finally, I look at a few examples of collaborative failures on behalf of the government and the community. Over the course of my research, it became apparent the people killed Centralia, not the fire.

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Created

Date Created
2019-12

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The Arizona Global Development Network and The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: A Case Study of Arizona’s NGOs

Description

The Arizona Global Development Network (AGDN) is a group of diverse nonprofit organizations within the state. This network is a platform for member organizations to collaborate and exchange ideas on a wide range of topics regarding international development. Announced in

The Arizona Global Development Network (AGDN) is a group of diverse nonprofit organizations within the state. This network is a platform for member organizations to collaborate and exchange ideas on a wide range of topics regarding international development. Announced in 2016, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) consists of 17 goals determined by the United Nations to address complex issues regarding human health, inequality and the environment around the globe. This self-designed code categorization study and semi-structured qualitative interviews aimed to explore Arizona’s international impacts and its alignment to the SDGs. First, the study completed a comprehensive observation of the information presented on these organizations’ websites. Second, interviews were conducted with representatives from each organization. The findings of this study provide an in-depth understanding of the network’s contributions to the wider, international community.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05

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An Analysis and Comparison of Sexual Assault Prevalence During the COVID-19 Pandemic to Pre-Pandemic Years Using Forensic Screening Exams in Maricopa County

Description

During the year 2020, the world saw unprecedented social change with the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, including increased risk of sexual assault. Limited information has been released regarding the pandemic and sexual assault; however, two prior studies reveal decreased

During the year 2020, the world saw unprecedented social change with the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, including increased risk of sexual assault. Limited information has been released regarding the pandemic and sexual assault; however, two prior studies reveal decreased utilization of rape kits and fewer emergency department exams for sexual assault during 2020 when compared to values before the pandemic. In Maricopa County, a group of forensic nurse examiners under HonorHealth performed screening exams on patients who reported sexual assault from the years 2015 to 2021. Using the prevalence of screening exams per year in Maricopa County, this study evaluated whether there was significant change in the number of exams performed during 2020 compared to pre-pandemic values. The year 2020 had the greatest percent discrepancy between predicted and observed quantities of exams when compared to the years 2015 to 2019.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05

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Social Entrepreneurship with Tony's Chocolonely

Description

Students completing a Cross-Sector Leadership certificate through ASU's Next Generation Service Corps program are required to take a course on social entrepreneurship. In partnership with the program and Tony's Chocolonely, a Dutch chocolate company working to make 100% slave free

Students completing a Cross-Sector Leadership certificate through ASU's Next Generation Service Corps program are required to take a course on social entrepreneurship. In partnership with the program and Tony's Chocolonely, a Dutch chocolate company working to make 100% slave free the norm in the chocolate industry, a semester-long course has been designed for this, including a week-long study abroad element to the company headquarters in Amsterdam. This required designing 15 weeks of academic content from start to finish; planning a trip itinerary and budget; collaborating with employees from Tony's Chocolonely, the ASU Global Education Office, the UNDP, and the Next Generation Service Corps at ASU; and preparing all of the material necessary for proposing a study abroad course for a future course instructor to present to the Global Education Office when it is ready to be implemented.

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Created

Date Created
2022-05