Matching Items (4)

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Education for Parents to Effectively Reduce Cyberbullying and Cyber-Vicimization

Description

Background: Cyberbullying and cyber-victimization are rising problems and are associated with increased risk for mental health problems in children. Methods for addressing cyberbullying are limited, however, interventions focused on promoting

Background: Cyberbullying and cyber-victimization are rising problems and are associated with increased risk for mental health problems in children. Methods for addressing cyberbullying are limited, however, interventions focused on promoting appropriate parental mediation strategies are a promising solution supported by evidence and by guided by the Theory of Parenting Styles.

Objective: To provide an educational session to parents of middle school students that promotes effective methods of preventing and addressing cyberbullying incidents. Design: The educational sessions were provided to eight parents middle school student. Surveys to assess parent perception of and planned response to cyberbullying incidents and Parent Adolescent Communication Scale (PACS) scores were collected pre-presentation, post-presentation, and at one-month follow up.

Results: Data analysis of pre- and post-presentation PACS using a Wilcoxon test found no significant difference (Z = -.405, p >.05). There was not enough response to the 1-month follow-up to perform a data analysis on follow-up data.

Conclusions: Due to low attendance and participation in the follow-up survey the results of this project are limited. However, parents did appear to benefit from communicating concerns about cyberbullying with school officials. Future studies should examine if a school-wide anti-cyberbullying program that actively involves parents effects parental response to cyberbullying.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-04-30

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Screening Older Adults for Depression in Primary Care

Description

Background and Purpose:
Depression in older adults is a significant problem that often goes undetected and untreated in primary care. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening adults for

Background and Purpose:
Depression in older adults is a significant problem that often goes undetected and untreated in primary care. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening adults for depression in primary care to increase detection, so it can be adequately managed. Despite this recommendation, screening rates in primary care are low. The purpose of this project was to implement a screening intervention and examine the effect of screening on the treatment of depression in older adults.

Methods:
The screening intervention was implemented as an evidence-based project in a small primary care practice. Consenting adults ≥ 65 years of age were screened with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Research indicates the PHQ-9 is valid and reliable for older adults. A post-screening chart audit was conducted to collect data and analyze the outcome of screening related to treatment.

Conclusions:
A total of 38 participants were screened. Five (13.2%) participants had a positive screening, two received treatment during the follow up period. The number of participants who were treated after a positive screening was significant (p= .040).

Implications for Practice:
Screening can increase detection and treatment of depression and reduce the associated illness burden in the older adult population.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-21

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The Effects of mindfulness on Depression and Anxiety

Description

Depression and anxiety are common and debilitating illnesses that negatively impact personal well-being and functioning. The effects of depression and anxiety not only affect the individual, but also peers, family,

Depression and anxiety are common and debilitating illnesses that negatively impact personal well-being and functioning. The effects of depression and anxiety not only affect the individual, but also peers, family, the community, economy, and even the health care system. Pharmacological therapy is a first line treatment for depression and anxiety, but the risk for relapse remains. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) are treatments that have demonstrated effectiveness in treating depression. The evidence suggests that both therapies are successful in terms of reducing depressive symptoms, but most effective when combined. Further, evidence shows that the combination of MBCT and traditional pharmacological therapy provides relief from depressive symptoms and lengthens the amount of time between recurrent episodes and improves the quality of life. A project was implemented at an integrated health clinic to evaluate the effectiveness of a mindfulness-based intervention to reduce the symptoms of depression and anxiety. The results revealed that practicing mindfulness was statistically and clinically significant in reducing depression and anxiety. In addition, mindfulness scores increased over 30 day application of the intervention. The results demonstrated the value of utilizing mindfulness as a cost-effective therapy in addition to pharmacological treatment to decrease symptoms of depression and anxiety, as well as improve mindfulness. The ease of use demonstrated the value of mindfulness and self-directed skills aimed at improving wellness, reducing depression and anxiety which will result in the improvement of individual, economic, healthcare system, and community health.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-28

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The Role of Sponsorship and Relapse Prevention

Description

Background and Aims: The aim of this research was to assess whether clients receiving treatment for substance abuse in a residential treatment facility will achieve lower rates of relapse with

Background and Aims: The aim of this research was to assess whether clients receiving treatment for substance abuse in a residential treatment facility will achieve lower rates of relapse with treatment in combination with active sponsorship. Prior studies suggest sponsorship may equally be impactful as attending 12-step meetings.

Design: The primary hypothesis was that active participation as defined by contact with a sponsor of an hour or more per week, as measured by the impact on affective characteristics correlated with increased levels of sobriety, when measured by the AWARE questionnaire (Advance Warning of Relapse) within 7 days of entry and prior to discharge (within 30 days). Setting: The project took place in a residential treatment facility in Phoenix, Arizona.

Participants: There were 12 clients from a men’s house and 12 clients from a woman’s house, all of which were going through recovery. Intervention: The educational session explained what a sponsor is and the importance of finding one early as a key role in relapse prevention.

Measurements: Pre and post-test results were compared to see if there was an impact on the predictability of relapse and sponsorship. The paired t-test was performed to compare the two means of AWARE scores. A lower score on the AWARE questionnaire indicates a person is more likely to succeed in sobriety.

Findings: Based on 24 samples collected, the mean scores within the first seven days were 91.17 with a standard deviation of 18.59 and the mean score prior to discharge were 72.78 with a standard deviation (SD) of 20.02. The mean difference between the two scores was 18.39 (SD=2.84). There was a significant effect of the relapse prevention program which included sponsorship, t (22) = 4.79, p < 0.001.

Conclusion: Implications for practice include increased time with sponsors to reduce rates of relapse. Future concerns include good fit matching which may reduce rates of relapse even further.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-04-21