Matching Items (14)

"The Freshman 15", Fact or Fiction: Exploring Food Literacy in College Freshmen

Description

College students experience a significant weight gain that is much greater than an age matched population. The rate of gain is 5.5 times greater than the average population, leading to

College students experience a significant weight gain that is much greater than an age matched population. The rate of gain is 5.5 times greater than the average population, leading to the popularization of the term "Freshman 15". The etiology of weight gain among college students is multifactorial, and it includes stress, time management, GPA pressures, extracurricular activities, financial obligations, transportation challenges, and often a new living situation. Other factors include bring unhealthy habits from their family of origin to their new university, and they are introduced to an environment that is unfamiliar, and they are expected to be independent and make their own decisions about a variety of lifestyle habits. Understanding the factors that influence food literacy, food choices, and lifestyle habits are integral to understanding which stage of change within the Transtheoretical Model an individual is in is ey to developing strategies for combating weight related health issues. The purpose of presenting a food demonstration to a group of freshman dorm dwelling students was to determine what stage of change in the Transtheoretical Model the average college freshman is in. The study found that exposing this group to the food demonstration pushed the students into either the contemplative stage or preparation stage for adopting healthy behavior changes regarding eating habits.

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  • 2017-05

The Importance and Integration of Dietary Fiber

Description

The concept of this thesis is the importance of dietary fiber and how it can be further integrated into the American diet. The adequate intake (AI) of fiber for men

The concept of this thesis is the importance of dietary fiber and how it can be further integrated into the American diet. The adequate intake (AI) of fiber for men and women is thirty-eight and twenty-five grams respectively. I was inspired to focus my research on increasing fiber intake because the typical American consumes fifteen grams of dietary fiber which is well below the AI. The purpose of this project was to inform individuals on the importance of dietary fiber, but also to create and compile recipes which would make it easy for people to increase their intake of dietary fiber. There are two parts to this project: a literature review and a cookbook. The literature review discusses the health benefits of fiber as to how its properties of viscosity and fermentability allow for weight loss, decrease appetite and energy intake, decrease postprandial insulin and glucose levels, impact gut health, lower blood lipid levels in order to protect against atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease, decrease inflammation, and reduce levels of inflammatory marker C-reactive protein. The cookbook provides the ideas for integrating high fiber foods into one's diet. There are three different categories in the cookbook: snacks, lunch and dinner, and breakfast. The snacks and breakfast provide around five grams of fiber per serving, if not more, whereas the lunch and dinner options provide around fifteen grams in a meal. Not only are these recipes high in fiber, but they are also nutrient dense, meaning they provide more than just the listed health benefits in the literature review. Having these recipes and increasing awareness of the benefits which they contain will help individuals to meet the AI of fiber while still enjoying delicious meals.

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  • 2017-12

Polycystic ovary syndrome: How does diet play a role?

Description

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine-metabolic disorder found in 5-10% of reproductive-aged women, and is characterized by symptoms such as increased blood-sugar levels and increased androgen production, which can

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine-metabolic disorder found in 5-10% of reproductive-aged women, and is characterized by symptoms such as increased blood-sugar levels and increased androgen production, which can cause a multitude of complications, including obesity, high blood-pressure, type-2 diabetes, infertility, acne, hirsutism, and much more. All of this is predicted to be the outcome of genetics, excess insulin production, low-grade inflammation, and/or hyperandrogenaemia. In attempt to reduce these experienced symptoms/causes, it is suggested that women with PCOS adopt healthy and balanced diets that incorporate foods low on the glycemic index, high in fiber, and low in anti-inflammatory properties, to help reduce insulin levels and low-grade inflammation. This dietary alteration should also be coupled with other lifestyle changes such as exercise, stress-reduction techniques, and, if needed, medications such as oral contraceptive pills and/or metformin to help regulate hormones and insulin levels. While further research needs to be conducted, these dietary considerations may help to alleviate the symptoms experienced by women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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  • 2020-05

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Barrett CookBook for Dorms

Description

The purpose of this cookbook was to provide students that live in the Barrett dorms with easily accessible nutritious meals that prevent total reliance on the dorm's dining hall throughout

The purpose of this cookbook was to provide students that live in the Barrett dorms with easily accessible nutritious meals that prevent total reliance on the dorm's dining hall throughout the year. Limitations of this research included staying within budget, the availability of near-by grocery stores, meal preparation time, and the types of appliances which can be used in dorms. While living in dorms many students may find that dining halls have a large variety of food offerings that are consistently available. Although there are many options, they are not necessarily the healthiest choices. In addition to health these options rarely change. For safety reasons students are limited to dorm room appliance options that include a mini-fridge and a microwave. There is not a lot of cooking you can do with just a microwave, but with the proper knowledge it is surprisingly enough to make a great meal. In addition to appliances students can utilize cutting boards, plates, and plastic utensils, but if students are not educated about cooking diverse meals it is easy to venture toward unhealthy meal choices. Attending college can be costly. Expenses of tuition, books, supplies and living fees can add up quickly. Students are always in need of healthy meal options that are also healthy for their bank accounts. This cookbook contains affordable, healthy, and quick to make recipes. Virtually everyone who has ever been a student usually has a weekly/monthly budgetary amount to spend and cooking their own meals in the dorms will turn out to be much cheaper alternative to having dining hall meals every day. It was interesting to create a week full of meal preps for breakfast, lunch and dinner- including snacks with various alternatives. Not every student has a vehicle in which they can get necessary ingredients for cooking; Therefore, this cookbook has a grocery store map that includes address and store hours to aid students in choosing closer more convenient locations. In college, the journey to a healthy lifestyle is not easy. There are many ways to keep on track and follow the routine which works for both the body and the mind. Following the easy recipes within this cook book will minimize the risk of freshman 15 weight gain and decrease the time spent on both cooking and coming up with healthy meal ideas. These meals are uncomplicated, affordable, and take little to no effort. Barrett CookBook for Dorms main mission was to provide students with a foundation for a nutritional, flexible, and stress-free dining environment without the added stress of constantly thinking about what goes into their bodies.

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  • 2018-05

Internationally Gluten-Free On a Shoestring

Description

Gluten is another name for natural proteins found in wheat, rye, barley and other grains that are commonly found in most boxed, pre-made, or baked items. However, the number of

Gluten is another name for natural proteins found in wheat, rye, barley and other grains that are commonly found in most boxed, pre-made, or baked items. However, the number of people diagnosed with Celiac's Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity, or Wheat Allergy has risen dramatically over the past few decades. In fact, the Gluten-Free Market is estimated to be worth 6.6 billion dollars by 2017. Therefore, this cookbook was made to provide quick, easy, and diverse recipes for people unable to ingest gluten without hurting their wallets.

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  • 2016-05

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Elementary School Lunches around the World

Description

This project looks into elementary school lunches around the world, with a focus on nutrition and government involvement. The project uses recent obesity research to determine the extent of childhood

This project looks into elementary school lunches around the world, with a focus on nutrition and government involvement. The project uses recent obesity research to determine the extent of childhood obesity and draws connections between obesity rates and each country's school food policies and resulting school lunch meals. The countries researched are Greece, the United States, Japan, and France. An effort is made to find accurate representations by using real unstaged pictures of the school lunches as well as using real, recent school lunch menus. Analysis of the nutritive balance of each country's overall school lunch meals includes explanation of possible reasoning for lower quality or lesser-balanced school lunch meals. In Greece, the steadily rising child obesity rates are possibly due to Greece's struggling economy and the loss of traditional Greek foods in school lunches. In the U.S., the culprit of uncontrolled obesity rates may be a combination of budget and an unhealthful food culture that can't easily adopt wholesome meals and meal preparation methods. However, there have been recent efforts at improving school lunches through reimbursement to schools who comply with the new USDA NSLP meal pattern, and in combination with a general increased interest in making school lunches better, school lunches in the U.S. have been improving. In Japan, where obesity rates are fairly low, the retaining of traditional cuisine and wholesome foods and cooking methods in combination with a higher meal budget are probable reasons why child obesity rates are under control. In France, the combination of a higher budget with school lunches carefully calculated for balance along with traditional foods cooked by skilled chefs results in possibly the most healthful and palatable school lunches of the countries analyzed. Overall it is concluded that major predictors of more healthy and less obese children are higher food budgets, greater use of traditional foods, and more wholesome foods and cooking methods over packaged foods.

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  • 2016-05

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Kids in the Kitchen: A Cookbook for Little Chefs

Description

Cases of diet-related illnesses are some of the most common illnesses we witness today. From heart disease to type 2 diabetes, from obesity to hypertension, many of these diseases are

Cases of diet-related illnesses are some of the most common illnesses we witness today. From heart disease to type 2 diabetes, from obesity to hypertension, many of these diseases are easily prevented by lifestyle changes. However, it is much easier to instill healthy habits in a population from the start rather than trying to change habits later, even if one's health depends on it. A pastime as simple as cooking allows us to take responsibility for our own health by (quite literally) taking it into our own hands. This is why I chose to write a cookbook for my honor's thesis. More importantly, this is why I chose to write a cookbook geared towards young children. My target audience is 8-11 years old because that's when I first started to cook, and it's a habit that has kept me well to this day. Within this cookbook, readers will find over 30 (mostly) healthy recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, and desserts, complete with written instructions and photographs to aid with meal preparation. My hope is that, during my career, I will be able to publish this book and distribute it to children who might not have an interest in cooking, but can learn basic cooking skills from my book. If kids get working in the kitchen, they might keep cooking as they grow older, which will help them keep control of their health for the better.

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  • 2016-12

Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes: Review and Recommendations for Icelandic Dairy

Description

The aim of this paper is to investigate the B-casein fractions in Scandinavian and Icelandic milk for evidence to either support or refute the claim that the A1 variant of

The aim of this paper is to investigate the B-casein fractions in Scandinavian and Icelandic milk for evidence to either support or refute the claim that the A1 variant of B-casein is diabetogenic in adolescent populations. Based on the theory that differences in milk protein composition explain a lower incidence of Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) in Iceland when compared to surrounding Nordic countries, an informative poster was created so that a more educated decision can be made by those wishing to take preventative measures against the incidence of the disease. This paper includes a basic background behind the epidemiology of T1D and the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. Next, comparison between milk protein composition and consumption in Iceland against the other Nordic countries is performed through an in-depth literature review. The review was conducted using PubMed databases until December of 2018. Key findings of this investigation raise concerns regarding the decision between optimizing milk producing rates or breeding for milk devoid of diabetogenic proteins. The current literature on the impact of cattle genetics on the protein composition of milk sheds light on the safety of Icelandic dairy and the resulting health of their population. Icelandic dairy has been evidenced to contain lower levels of A1 b-casein and is considered less diabetogenic. For these reasons, this author would recommend the consumption of Icelandic dairy products over those from other regions.

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  • 2020-05

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An Investigation of the UNDP's Human Development Report (HDR): A Case Study of Algeria and Morocco

Description

The primary goal of this paper is to analyze a tool used for measuring human
development on a global scale. Originally, development within a country was solely judged by the

The primary goal of this paper is to analyze a tool used for measuring human
development on a global scale. Originally, development within a country was solely judged by the degree of economic growth by way of Gross National Product (GNP) and per capita income. Holistically, GNP measures the total extent of economic activity of a country’s people within a given time period. (Rutherford, 2012). Critics found several issues with this one-dimensional approach of measuring human development. What failed to be recognized was the distribution of income among the country’s citizens. Higher incomes often favor men within the majority when compared to women and people of minority groups (Feiner & Roberts, 1990). GNP also failed to recognize the social limitations under a government. In other words, are there limitations as to what goods can be bought and who can buy them?

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  • 2020-05

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Gluten-Free Cooking: Healthy Dishes for New Chefs

Description

Those that must follow a Celiac diet should know that there are challenges that come with it. Wheat contains a ton of essential vitamins and minerals such as folate, magnesium,

Those that must follow a Celiac diet should know that there are challenges that come with it. Wheat contains a ton of essential vitamins and minerals such as folate, magnesium, thiamin and niacin among many others. By cutting these out, it is possible to become deficient in these essential nutrients that play roles all throughout the body. One of our goals in making this cookbook was to include recipes that would be packed with these dietary components. We wanted to not only make this cookbook tangible for newly-diagnosed Celiac people, but also ensure that they have the balanced diet they need to avoid deficiencies. While admittedly not every meal is going to be loaded with those good vitamins and minerals, we believe the phrase “everything in moderation” is a good way to approach this new diet.

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  • 2020-05