Matching Items (4)

Anti-Inflammatory Cookbook for Diabetic Patients

Description

The purpose of this cookbook is to provide pre-diabetic, type 1 and type 2 diabetics with a foundation of recipes. These recipes have been created with the intent of regulating

The purpose of this cookbook is to provide pre-diabetic, type 1 and type 2 diabetics with a foundation of recipes. These recipes have been created with the intent of regulating inflammation which can be caused by such metabolic abnormalities. I want to educate patients who suffer from these conditions that there are several ingredients that work alongside their condition rather than feeling that they are limited to foods and recipes. I want to increase patients moral and self-efficacy to explore and work with new ingredients. These series of recipes should be used as a guide to trying new foods however patients should know that they are able to add their own ingredients that are suitable to their liking or condition.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis through Lifestyle Changes: Nutrition, Exercise, Sleep, and Stress Management

Description

Multiple sclerosis is currently deemed the most common autoimmune disease. By definition, multiple sclerosis, known more commonly as MS, involves an immune-mediated process in which an abnormal response of the

Multiple sclerosis is currently deemed the most common autoimmune disease. By definition, multiple sclerosis, known more commonly as MS, involves an immune-mediated process in which an abnormal response of the body’s immune system is directed against the central nervous system (“Definition of MS,” n.d.). Common treatment protocols call for daily, monthly, or yearly disease-modifying medications. These drugs are taken indefinitely to stop the spread and appearance of new lesions, improve symptoms, and offer relief to the afflicted individuals. The necessity for patients to take these basic medical treatments is paramount, however, it should not be overlooked to make lifestyle changes as well. The purpose of this paper is to give a detailed understanding of multiple sclerosis, its etiology evolution, and medical advancements, while emphasizing the necessary transitions which must be made from a nutritional and lifestyle management standpoint. A brief focus will be placed on sleep, exercise, and stress management, with an emphasis on nutrition.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Effects of High-Intensity Interval Exercise (HIIE) vs Moderate-Intensity Continuous Exercise (MIE) on Postprandial Substrate Oxidation After Consumption of an Isocaloric High Sugar/ Fat Meal in Healthy Adults

Description

Obesity prevalence is high in the United States, in part due to increased fat storage following consumption of high fat/carbohydrate (sugar) foods. Following a meal, carbohydrate stimulates its own

Obesity prevalence is high in the United States, in part due to increased fat storage following consumption of high fat/carbohydrate (sugar) foods. Following a meal, carbohydrate stimulates its own oxidation, while simultaneously suppressing fat oxidation, ultimately leading to fat storage. Aerobic exercise preceding a meal increases fat oxidation in the postprandial period, which may reduce fat storage. The ideal exercise prescription for optimal postprandial fat oxidation is unknown. The effect of low and moderate intensity continuous exercise (MIE) has been studied extensively, while the effects of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) on post-prandial substrate oxidation has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of MIE and HIIE on postprandial substrate oxidation after consumption of an isocaloric meal (2 glazed donuts; 520 kcal) in healthy adults. Ten subjects (8 males, 2 females; age=24yr, BMI=24 kg/m2) completed three conditions in random order: 1) no exercise control; 2) MIE: cycling at 60-75%HRmax; 3) HIIE: cycling at 90-95%HRmax. The duration of each exercise bout was sufficient to expend approximately 520 kcal, the energy equivalent of the donuts, which were consumed 1 hour post-exercise. Immediately after consuming the donuts, pulmonary ventilation and gas exchange were measured breath-by-breath continuously and recorded (min-by-min) for 5 hours. Repeated measures analysis of covariance was used to compare the mean differences in outcome variables accounting for gender. Absolute postprandial fat oxidation (g/5 hours) was 17.3±5.4, 27.1±9.6 and 23±1.2 for control, MIE and HIIE trials respectively, with the postprandial fat oxidation significantly greater for the two exercise conditions compared to control. Relative to baseline values, both exercise conditions resulted in cumulative net postprandial fat oxidation significantly greater than control (control = -1.79±3.99g; MIE = 11.51±8.41g, HIIE= 9.51±5.20g). Therefore, results indicate that exercise most certainly increases postprandial fat oxidation, and that exercise type, either MIE or HIIE, is not as important as total energy expended. The fact that exercise of ~1 hour was required to oxidize the amount of fat in two donuts, that required only a few minutes to consume, highlights the challenges of using exercise for weight control in an obesogenic environment.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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The Effects of Intermittent Fasting on Quality of Life and Happiness: A Randomized Control Trial

Description

Background: College students face a particularly high prevalence of body dissatisfaction and weight instability increasing the risk of being unhappy and having a poor quality of life. Time-restricted feeding, a

Background: College students face a particularly high prevalence of body dissatisfaction and weight instability increasing the risk of being unhappy and having a poor quality of life. Time-restricted feeding, a type of intermittent fasting, has gained popularity recently for sustainable weight loss without the characteristic dietary restrictions of most fad diets. A limited number of randomized control trials have looked at the effects of time-restricted feeding in humans, but none have looked at how this dietary regimen impacts happiness and quality of life. Objective: The goal was to examine the effects of an 18-hour daily fasting regimen compared to an 8-hour daily fasting regimen on happiness and quality of life in college students in Arizona.
Methods: Participants included 29 healthy, non-smoking, non-vaping students attending college in Arizona between October 2020 to March 2021. Of the 16 participants allocated to the time-restricted feeding intervention, 8 completed the trial. Of the 13 participants allocated to the control group, 10 completed the trial. The eating window began within one hour of waking up with a 6-hour eating window for the intervention group and 16-hour window for the control group. They could do one cheat day per week. No dietary restrictions were enforced. Participants completed the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire and the WHOQOL-BREF quality of life questionnaire at baseline, week 4, and week 8. Week 8 data were not reported due to data collection changes and cancellations related to the new safety protocols for the COVID-19 pandemic.
Results: Quality of life related to social relationships improved significantly in the intervention group (p=0.026). There was a trend favoring the intervention group as well showing a possible improvement in happiness related to perceived energy levels (p=0.088). No other significant data were reported.
Conclusion: Adherence to an 18-hour time-restricted feeding regimen for 8 weeks may improve quality of life related to social relationships in college students in Arizona. The results of this trial do not suggest a significant impact on overall quality of life or happiness in this population.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021