Matching Items (5)

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How Privilege and Opportunity Are Associated with Psychological Well-being

Description

Ethnic groups experience different societal and economic circumstances that contribute to their well-being. Life satisfaction and happiness are commonly used as a measure of well-being; but they are not often

Ethnic groups experience different societal and economic circumstances that contribute to their well-being. Life satisfaction and happiness are commonly used as a measure of well-being; but they are not often used to evaluate well-being in lower income countries. This study focuses on the self-reported life satisfaction and happiness of members of ethnic groups from low- and middle-income countries and its correlation with ethnic privilege, gender opportunity, and income. Using two self-reported measures of well-being—life satisfaction and happiness—among 110,391 women in 27 countries (ages 15-49) surveyed in Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, this study examines how country-level indicators of gender opportunity, ethnic-level indicators of privilege and household-level measures of wealth are associated with well-being. Our findings indicate a significant relationship between ethnic privilege, gender opportunity and income on life satisfaction. The results from this study provide valuable data and implications for lower income countries to identify and reduce modifiable risk factors that affect a population’s well-being.

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Date Created
  • 2020-05

An exploratory study of COVID-19 risk perceptions, preventative behaviors, and intent to vaccinate among Latinos.

Description

In late 2019, COVID-19, a new disease caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus began to take over the lives of many people. This study centers on how members of

In late 2019, COVID-19, a new disease caused by a novel (or new) coronavirus began to take over the lives of many people. This study centers on how members of the Latinx community have been affected by COVID-19. Both quantitative and qualitative data were utilized to analyze the perceived risk of infection, preventative behaviors, and acceptability of the COVID-19 vaccine for individuals that identify as Latinx. Analysis of the survey and interview analysis found the majority of participants expressed abiding by recommended measures and becoming hypervigilant about their activities, and their desire to get vaccinated against COVID-19 when they are eligible. Individuals who did not express the desire to be vaccinated mentioned worries including side effects, costs, safety, and efficacy of the vaccine. Results from this research could aid in the creation of public health initiatives in order to increase the uptake of the vaccine tailored for the Latinx community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Impact of Cultural Perceptions on Contraceptive Use Among Young Mexican- American Women

Description

Existing knowledge of Latina sexual health disparities has been discussed through traditional barriers such as financial, language, or location. Contraceptive use is proven to greater economic, social, and health outcomes

Existing knowledge of Latina sexual health disparities has been discussed through traditional barriers such as financial, language, or location. Contraceptive use is proven to greater economic, social, and health outcomes across women of all racial and ethnic backgrounds. This study aims to explore another factor, specifically among young Mexican-American women – whether or not cultural perceptions on sexual health impact the decision to use contraception. In- depth qualitative interviews were conducted among first-generation Mexican-American women ages 18-25 residing in Arizona. The results show that while negative cultural perceptions faced additional barriers in seeking contraception, it was not a complete deterrent for any participant. If anything, this motivated participants to actively destigmatize sexual health in their communities by speaking more openly about their experiences with others.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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An Exploration of Educators’ Roles for Building Social Resilience to Natural Disasters in Small Island Developing States

Description

Small island developing states (SIDS) are on the very frontlines of climate change (UNDP, 2017). Increasing attention on the unique social, economic, and environmental vulnerabilities SIDS face has led to

Small island developing states (SIDS) are on the very frontlines of climate change (UNDP, 2017). Increasing attention on the unique social, economic, and environmental vulnerabilities SIDS face has led to the discussion of the overall resilience of this population. Specifically, post-disaster studies of resilience carried out on SIDS have pointed to social resilience and education as two primary indicators of the overall resilience of these vulnerable communities (Aldrich, 2012; Muttarak & Lutz, 2014); yet social aspects of resilience related to SIDS have been underexplored, in comparison to ecological and economic themes (Berkes & Ross, 2013). Thus, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the personal and professional lived-natural disaster experiences of SIDS residents who are educators in order to understand their role in building social resilience within their community. In-depth interviews were conducted with educators employed at public and private schools in the United States Virgin Islands. The findings indicate that residents who are educators conceptualized resilience according to the following themes and sub-themes: (1) Social Process which involves Social Recovery and Community Alliances to ‘bounce back’ to an undefined level of normalcy and (2) Embodied Identity which was described in terms of Community Personifications of resilience as a trait in general citizens and educators. Participants identified internal and external resources as influential in how residents responded to natural disasters, by so doing, significantly contributing to positive post-disaster outcomes; these resources are referred to in the literature as protective factors (Rutter, 1985). The findings also demonstrate that educators had both a personal and professional responsibility to help their community contend with disasters, and this outcome is best explicated through the concept of protective factors. The research findings are significant because they: (1) contribute to the limited body of literature on social resilience in small island developing states, (2) demonstrate the importance of subjective perspectives in the development of disaster preparedness and management strategies for climate-vulnerable island populations, and (3) indicate a need for future research to use terminology which acknowledges the many ways in which disaster-prone communities have historically demonstrated and/or embodied resilience.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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An exploration of three generations of a Jemez Pueblo family impacted by federal Indian relocation policy: identity, indigeneity, and notions of belonging

Description

This dissertation is comprised three main sections including a journal article, book chapter and a policy reflection piece. My guiding research question is the following—How do Jemez Pueblo people and

This dissertation is comprised three main sections including a journal article, book chapter and a policy reflection piece. My guiding research question is the following—How do Jemez Pueblo people and their descendants who migrated to California as a result of the Relocation Act of 1956 define their cultural identities?

The journal article seeks to address the question: How can we explore the experiences of Urban Native Americans from a strengths-based approach, restructuring dominant narratives, and breaking barriers between urban and reservation spaces? Additionally, the journal article will provide a literature overview on urban American Indian experiences, including the stories of three generations of my family impacted by the Relocation period, in addition to the major findings of my research study. The book chapter is informed by the following question: How might Pueblo perspectives of identity benefit from examining multiple theories of Indigeneity? I seek to explore the complexity of Indigenous identities and examine multiple theories of Indigeneity that can assist Pueblo peoples in thinking about community and membership, and in particular, with regards to those tribal peoples who have relocated away from their Pueblos. I will include salient points from my dissertation research that help us to answer this question.

The policy reflections piece conveys the urgency to address the continued use of blood quantum in our Pueblo communities as a measurement for tribal citizenship. Like many other Indigenous parents, my interest in this issue is of personal importance to me as my own child is not eligible for enrollment in any of my tribal nations; thus, I have had to consider what a post “American Indian” identity is going to look like for her. I want to urge Pueblo communities and tribal governance to begin to rethink notions of citizenry and belongingness rooted in our original instructions, what Pueblo people refer to as our core values. The three sections of this dissertation are interrelated in that they seek to grow a more inclusive Pueblo community in effort to retain our cultural practices and belief systems for generations to come.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018