Matching Items (6)

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Analysis of Mesa Urban Garden's Impact on Their Community

Description

Community gardens are used worldwide to promote sustainable, urban living. They can be used to improve the physical, mental, emotional, and social health of the gardeners and volunteers who utilize

Community gardens are used worldwide to promote sustainable, urban living. They can be used to improve the physical, mental, emotional, and social health of the gardeners and volunteers who utilize their grounds. The gardens may also have a positive impact on the local environment and wider community. This study examines a community garden seeking to expand its involvement in the local neighborhood and searching for ways to include local residents in garden related activities. To this end, the garden was waiting for approval on their non-profit, 501(c)3 status, and was seeking additional data on local residents and perceptions of the garden's activities. This thesis first reviews the literature on the benefits community gardens provide for the individuals living in their communities and their impact on urban development. The thesis then turns to an analysis of one garden, Mesa Urban Garden, rooted in the Downtown District of Mesa, Arizona, and how they are impacting their neighborhood and how garden organizers can respond in new and creative ways to local residents.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Analysis of Mesa Urban Garden's Impact on Their Community

Description

Community gardens are used worldwide to promote sustainable, urban living. They can be used to improve the physical, mental, emotional, and social health of the gardeners and volunteers who utilize

Community gardens are used worldwide to promote sustainable, urban living. They can be used to improve the physical, mental, emotional, and social health of the gardeners and volunteers who utilize their grounds. The gardens may also have a positive impact on the local environment and wider community. This study examines a community garden seeking to expand its involvement in the local neighborhood and searching for ways to include local residents in garden related activities. To this end, the garden was waiting for approval on their non-profit, 501(c)3 status, and was seeking additional data on local residents and perceptions of the garden's activities. This thesis first reviews the literature on the benefits community gardens provide for the individuals living in their communities and their impact on urban development. The thesis then turns to an analysis of one garden, Mesa Urban Garden, rooted in the Downtown District of Mesa, Arizona, and how they are impacting their neighborhood and how garden organizers can respond in new and creative ways to local residents.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

HOME ENVIRONMENTS OF INFANTS FROM IMMIGRANT FAMILIES IN THE UNITED STATES: FINDINGS FROM THE NEW IMMIGRANT SURVEY

Description

Data from the New Immigrant Survey were used to describe the home environments of 638 children ages birth to three whose parents legally immigrated to the United States. Thirty-two indicators

Data from the New Immigrant Survey were used to describe the home environments of 638 children ages birth to three whose parents legally immigrated to the United States. Thirty-two indicators of home conditions were clustered into 4 domains: discipline and socioemotional support, learning materials, enriching experiences, and family activities. Results revealed variation in how frequently infants from every country (Mexico, El Salvador, India, Philippines) and region (East Asia, Europe, Caribbean, Africa) studied experienced each home environmental condition. There were differences between countries and regions on many indicators as well as differences based on parents’ level of education. The experiences documented for children of recent legal immigrants were similar to those documented for children of native-born families in other studies.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-11-01

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Immigrant Incorporation in the U.S. and Mexico: Well-being, Community Reception, and National Identity in Contexts of Reception and Return

Description

This dissertation focuses on the incorporation of twenty first century mixed-status families, living in Phoenix, Arizona and Central Mexico. Using a combination of research methods, chapters illustrate patterns of immigrant

This dissertation focuses on the incorporation of twenty first century mixed-status families, living in Phoenix, Arizona and Central Mexico. Using a combination of research methods, chapters illustrate patterns of immigrant incorporation by focusing on well-being, community reception, and national identity. First, results of mixed-method data collected in Phoenix, Arizona from 2009-2010 suggest that life satisfaction varies by integration scores, a holistic measure of how immigrants are integrating into their communities by accounting for individual, household, and contextual factors. Second, findings from qualitative data collected in Mexico during 2010, illustrate that communities receive parents and children differently. Third, a continued analysis of qualitative 2010 data from Mexico, exhibits that both parents and children identify more with the U.S. than with Mexico, regardless of where they were born. Together these chapters contribute to broad concepts of assimilation, well-being, community reception, and national identity.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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Divorce access attitudes in America: exploring structure and values for a new theoretical framework

Description

This thesis builds upon previous research exploring the different factors that influence divorce access attitudes, using data drawn from the General Social Survey in 1991, 1994, and 2008. I examine

This thesis builds upon previous research exploring the different factors that influence divorce access attitudes, using data drawn from the General Social Survey in 1991, 1994, and 2008. I examine different social values and economic characteristics and their influence on divorce access attitudes, and explore gender differences within these factors. I examine how information drawn from this analysis supports the argument for Second Demographic Transition Theory as a theoretical framework to explain influential factors in the formation of divorce access attitudes. I conclude that social values variables related to attitudes towards sex behaviors remain significant predictors of divorce access attitudes. I also recognize that socioeconomic context bears influence on the formation of divorce access attitudes. Gender differences lead to the conclusion that behavior and interactions around divorce access attitude formation are dynamic and complex, but are effectively explained using Second Demographic Transition Theory.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Return migration: modes of incorporation for mixed nativity households in Mexico

Description

United States and Mexico population statistics show clear evidence of return migration. This study uses qualitative data collected in a municipality in the State of Mexico during the summer of

United States and Mexico population statistics show clear evidence of return migration. This study uses qualitative data collected in a municipality in the State of Mexico during the summer of 2010 from families comprised of Mexican nationals and United States-born children post-relocation to Mexico. Using Portes and Zhou's theoretical framework on modes of incorporation, this study illustrates the government policy, societal reception and coethnic community challenges the first and second generation face in their cases of family return migration. This study finds that the municipal government is indifferent to foreign children and their incorporation in Mexico schools. Furthermore, extended family and community, may not always aid the household's adaptation to Mexico. Despite the lack of a coethnic community, parents eventually acclimate into manual and entrepreneurial positions in society and the children contend to find a place called home.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2011