Matching Items (22)

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The Narratives of the Women's March

Description

This study looked at the Women's March's use of social media to communicate their organization's mission. Data was collected from their official Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts. Facebook posts were

This study looked at the Women's March's use of social media to communicate their organization's mission. Data was collected from their official Twitter, Instagram and Facebook accounts. Facebook posts were collected manually, Twitter data was collected with a Google Sheets add-on and Instagram was collected by Picodash. All the posts were shifted through multiple times to identify the key narratives of the Women's March. These narratives were then compared to the stated "Unity Principles" of the organization to see if they aligned with what the Women's March attempted to fight for. The five narratives were "everyone should have access to affordable health care," "women should have access to positions of power and be respected," "immigrants should be welcomed within the United States," "society will be stronger if it addresses issues intersectionally," and "everyone should be safe in the world and treated as equals." Analysis showed that each of these narratives reflected the "Unity Principles" in some form. While certain narratives were related to more principles than others, it does not diminish the importance of each message.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Analyzing the Brand Personalities and Social Media Practices of College Athletic Twitter Accounts

Description

This study examined the brand personality types and social media practices of six college athletic Twitter accounts. Specifically, this study investigated whether certain brand personalities corresponded with specific social media

This study examined the brand personality types and social media practices of six college athletic Twitter accounts. Specifically, this study investigated whether certain brand personalities corresponded with specific social media practices on Twitter. The author conducted a content analysis of each school's tweets to measure brand personality and scraped data in order to collect social media practice information. Results suggest that brand personality and social media practices are distinct. Extraversion was the most common personality type among all schools. In addition, schools that tweeted less frequently than others exhibited more brand personality and used more visual media.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

Imaging Roosevelt Row: Identity Construction Through Street Style Fashion

Description

This thesis analyzes identity construction through street style fashion in the city. The focus of this project is Roosevelt Row, the artists' district in Downtown Phoenix. The goal of this

This thesis analyzes identity construction through street style fashion in the city. The focus of this project is Roosevelt Row, the artists' district in Downtown Phoenix. The goal of this project is to compare Roosevelt Row's marketing image with the fashion seen on the streets and at events in the area. The creative project involved the creation of an iPad publication displaying the street style fashions seen on Roosevelt Row. This project aims to analyze if the street style fashion seen on Roosevelt Row reflects the marketing image of the area.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-12

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Social Media Across Europe: The Cronkite Euro Experience

Description

Cronkite Global Initiatives' philosophy is "To see the world. To know the world. To report the world." According to the Cronkite School, Cronkite Global Initiatives is designed to build connections

Cronkite Global Initiatives' philosophy is "To see the world. To know the world. To report the world." According to the Cronkite School, Cronkite Global Initiatives is designed to build connections between students, staff, faculty and media professionals internationally. The Cronkite study abroad programs have been built under this mission. The Cronkite Study Abroad Program originated in the summer of 2003 with students traveling to London, Paris and Rome. Since then students have had the opportunities to travel to Barcelona, China, Brazil, Paris, Milan, Berlin and London. While abroad, these students have had many different opportunities, including the chance to cover the Summer Olympics in London. In 2016 students will be able to travel to Jordan, Greece and Israel to study social media and its impact in the Middle East and social justice within these counties. Cronkite Euro 2014 visited London, Paris and Milan, studying social media and how media organizations in each country utilize it. Cronkite Euro 2015 visited Berlin, Milan and London, also looking at social media and news organization abroad. Cronkite Euro is a three week study abroad program put on by the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Communication during the summer semester. The focus of the program is to look at news organizations across Europe and how they utilize social media to reach their audience. Over the span of the trip students work as journalists in the field reporting on stories within each city. Throughout the trip students consistently tweet, write Facebook posts, created Storifys and do stand-ups abroad. Students experienced what it is like to live in each of these cities as well as what it is like to work as a journalist overseas. Over the three weeks students have the opportunity to visit over 10 news organizations across Europe, meeting with journalists and learning how these news organizations implement social media into their reporting. The trip is designed to teach students about social media and help them develop a strong social media presence while they are abroad. While abroad students have the opportunity to explore the cities both journalistically as well as culturally, visiting locations such as the Louvre, Big Ben and the Berlin Wall. The purpose of this thesis project is to put together a comprehensive video portraying how the trips affected student and faculty's view on journalism across the globe. The video can be viewed at this link: https://youtu.be/Eog-stwglxw

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Socially Mediated Stranger Things: Audiences Cultures and Full-Season Releases

Description

Television is currently in a changing state. There is no longer a singular broadcast format for series to follow. Streaming websites such as Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime now release

Television is currently in a changing state. There is no longer a singular broadcast format for series to follow. Streaming websites such as Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime now release series in their entirety; this is known as a full-season release (FSR). Viewers are now able to act independently and determine the pace they wish to watch a new FSR series. This not only affects how fans engage in social television discussions on social media, but also changes the previously proposed viewer engagement model. Whereas previous research suggests that fans follow a static linear engagement model consisting of pre-communication, parallel communication, and post communication phases, fans are now able to move freely through viewer engagement phases. This creates a new type of engagement model: The Atomized Engagement Model. As fans move freely through the atomized engagement phases, they choose social media platforms to engage in fandom discussion. Research suggests that although there are distinct types of posts that occur in relation to social television discussions, the platforms used have a direct effect on the content and length of the post.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Information Comprehension and Retention in the Digital Age

Description

This study looked at college-age students' ability to comprehend and retain information learned from news articles depending on what platform they read from. Fifteen participants read three local New York

This study looked at college-age students' ability to comprehend and retain information learned from news articles depending on what platform they read from. Fifteen participants read three local New York Times articles on each of the platforms provided: iPad, laptop, and paper. They took one test immediately after to test comprehension and another two weeks later to test their retention. Participants were also asked if they found the articles interesting, enjoyable, clear, etc. Results showed that participants' views on each format had little, if any, affect on their number of correct responses. The most consistent results on the participants' perceptions of the formats came from the laptop and paper, whereas the iPad received a bimodal pattern of responses. Participants were also asked to share their news habits while taking the test by selecting how frequently they gain news from various sources such as social media or television. These habits also seemed to have very little effect on their scores.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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A Comparison of Public Relations Ethics in Spain and the United States

Description

This paper aims to assess potential similarities and differences in the way that public relations professionals approach ethics in Spain and The United States. The approach taken for this study

This paper aims to assess potential similarities and differences in the way that public relations professionals approach ethics in Spain and The United States. The approach taken for this study was first a thematic analysis of industry-accepted codes of ethics. These were the PRSA Code of Ethics from the United States and the ADECEC and Dircom codes of ethics from Spain. Although the codes provide a basis for a basic analysis, it is hard to say how public relations professionals implement ethical practices in their work solely based on codes of ethics. To further study the ethics in practice, interviews with public relations professionals from a 2012 trip to Madrid were transcribed and analyzed for key themes. To assess ethics in practice in the United States, public relations blog posts related to ethics were analyzed for key themes. The history of public relations in Spain is much shorter than in the United States The histories of the and cultural differences may be the cause of some of the differences in ethics.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Making a Name for the CounterAct Initiative at ASU

Description

The backlash surrounding sexual violence in the media (social and traditional) demonstrates support for the fight against sexual violence, and, according to statistics, ASU is home to large populations of

The backlash surrounding sexual violence in the media (social and traditional) demonstrates support for the fight against sexual violence, and, according to statistics, ASU is home to large populations of some of the most high-risk groups. As a place of higher education, ASU recognizes that a proactive approach to sexual misconduct, educating at-risk publics, is as necessary as spreading awareness of the problem. It also acknowledges the healing power of the arts. Acts of sexual violence target the human body and performance arts, like dance, focus on control over body movements. Additionally, art in general is proven to improve one's physical, mental and emotional well-being. Even though the stigma of being a victim of sexual assault has been lessened by people sharing their stories through social and traditional media, sexual assault is traumatizing for the victim. This can lead victims to be hesitant to report or talk about their past trauma, and creates a barrier to discussion of sexual violence on campus. Thus, the goal of CounterAct is to raise awareness of the prevalence of sexual misconduct on campus and throughout American culture. Recognizing the factors that contribute to sexual assault in addition to healing through creative action can change rape culture to respect culture on campus and in the surrounding community.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Social Media and Public Relations: A Qualitative Analysis of Practitioners' Usage, Perceptions and Measurement

Description

A qualitative analysis that compares the social media usage, perceptions and measurement tools of public relations practitioners across a variety of industries.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Information Comprehension and Retention in the Digital Age

Description

This study looked at college-age students' ability to comprehend and retain information learned from news articles depending on what platform they read from. Fifteen participants read three local New York

This study looked at college-age students' ability to comprehend and retain information learned from news articles depending on what platform they read from. Fifteen participants read three local New York Times articles on each of the platforms provided: iPad, laptop, and paper. They took one test immediately after to test comprehension and another two weeks later to test their retention. Participants were also asked if they found the articles interesting, enjoyable, clear, etc. Results showed that participants' views on each format had little, if any, affect on their number of correct responses. The most consistent results on the participants' perceptions of the formats came from the laptop and paper, whereas the iPad received a bimodal pattern of responses. Participants were also asked to share their news habits while taking the test by selecting how frequently they gain news from various sources such as social media or television. These habits also seemed to have very little effect on their scores.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05