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Arts Now! The Benefits of Arts Education Within Education as a Whole

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Crescendo, an after school program that was created to fulfill the Thesis/Creative Project requirement for Barrett, the Honors College, linked musical excellence with academic excellence in pursuit of social change for sixty of Tempe's underprivileged students in Thew Elementary School.

Crescendo, an after school program that was created to fulfill the Thesis/Creative Project requirement for Barrett, the Honors College, linked musical excellence with academic excellence in pursuit of social change for sixty of Tempe's underprivileged students in Thew Elementary School. This program focused on five main objectives: musical excellence through refined music education, academic excellence through tutorship, promotion of a positive self-image through community performances, development of strong communication skills through ensemble experience, and accessibility to students by providing the program free of cost. Students enrolled in this program were involved in musical rehearsal, college readiness sessions, a field trip to the Musical Instrument Museum, a music performance for the community, and academic assistance. Results of the overall effectiveness of the program were measured through a pre/post survey that was administered to the students and through dialogue with the teachers and parents of the participating students. The literary component of this project discusses the need for the integrations of outside arts organizations, like Crescendo, into schools, outlines the startup tasks of an arts education program (i.e. acquiring funding, designating volunteers, receiving permission, pinpointing a group of participants, etc.), offers before/after snapshot of the progress of the student participants, and provides a comparison to other programs of its type.

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2014-05

A catalog of solo works for marimba with electronics: and an examination and performance guide of "Flux" for marimba and electronic tape by Mei-Fang Lin

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The marimba has garnered increased attention in percussion performance over the past thirty years. Literature for beginners through professionals in a multitude of styles have been written. With the ever-growing number of marimbists since the 1980's there has been a

The marimba has garnered increased attention in percussion performance over the past thirty years. Literature for beginners through professionals in a multitude of styles have been written. With the ever-growing number of marimbists since the 1980's there has been a high demand for new works. Numerous pieces were created through commissions: composers contracted to write music by individuals, institutions, and consortia. Three primary types of marimba solo music were written: unaccompanied solos, concerti, and marimba solos with electronic accompaniment. Since electronic music is relatively new in marimba performance, there is very little information published regarding this topic. Only a handful of well-known compositions in this genre have been widely performed, and a great number of existing works are unfamiliar to the percussion world. The goal of this study is to generate an overview of electronic music in marimba performance by compiling a chronological catalog of compositions written for solo marimba with electronics. In addition, this study wishes to promote this genre of solo marimba music through the commission, performance, examination, and recording of a new work for marimba and electronics. It is the author's wish to bring this topic to percussionists' attention, and to enrich the marimba solo literature by both exploring existing literature and encouraging the commissioning and performance of marimba music.

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2011

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Examining Underutilized Keyboard Percussion Instruments in Contemporary Music Through Collaboration: Commissioning Three New Works for Unaccompanied and Accompanied Xylophone and Glockenspiel

Description

Noting a lack of solo repertoire for two popular keyboard percussion instruments, the glockenspiel and xylophone, I set out to bring the two instruments up to a level where both could be recognized as vehicles for solo performance. I decided

Noting a lack of solo repertoire for two popular keyboard percussion instruments, the glockenspiel and xylophone, I set out to bring the two instruments up to a level where both could be recognized as vehicles for solo performance. I decided to collaborate with three composers who are not percussionists: Nick Bentz (fitful machinery for solo glockenspiel and fixed media), Ashlee Busch (Elements for solo xylophone and crotales), and Hunter Long (We’ve always had time on our side for solo xylophone and percussion ensemble). By collaborating with these three young composers, I hope to elevate the stature of these underutilized percussion instruments. This document provides information about each composer, the commissioning process, and examinations of each work. In addition, I will discuss some of the challenges of working with non-percussionist composers, issues on performance practice, and my solutions to those challenges.

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2021

Percussion Ensemble Performance Practices and Instrumentation Changes: Comparing New to Old

Description

The percussion ensemble pieces of the 1930s and 1940s have many performance practice and instrumental selection considerations when performed in the modern day. The four pieces of music under consideration for this study are Ionisation (1933) by Edgard Varèse, Ostinato

The percussion ensemble pieces of the 1930s and 1940s have many performance practice and instrumental selection considerations when performed in the modern day. The four pieces of music under consideration for this study are Ionisation (1933) by Edgard Varèse, Ostinato Pianissimo (1934) by Henry Cowell, First Construction (In Metal) (1939), and Third Construction (1941), both by John Cage. These works have stood the test of time, and are still an important part of today’s percussive literature. As with many historical works, issues such as interpretation and instrument selection arise when performed in the twenty first century. This project aims to provide general considerations and specific solutions when preparing these works for performance. The research conducted in this paper will help percussionists and musicologists alike further understand how to properly replicate the early percussion ensemble music, if the performers objectives are to emulate the composers’ original intentions.

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2021