Matching Items (10)

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A Theory of Change: How the Mind, the Heart, and the Future can be Shaped Through Creative Expression

Description

The goal of this thesis was to create a theory of change for an annual Multicultural Arts Camp (MAC) that offers youth with trauma histories opportunities to cultivate protective factors associated with resilience. MAC is designed to promote four primary

The goal of this thesis was to create a theory of change for an annual Multicultural Arts Camp (MAC) that offers youth with trauma histories opportunities to cultivate protective factors associated with resilience. MAC is designed to promote four primary protective outcomes among its participants: (1) safety, (2) self-expression, (3) skill-building and (4) self-efficacy through exploration of various multicultural art forms and connecting with caring adults. The theory of change was informed by my observations during my experience as a MAC volunteer and my review of academic literature to better define and understand how various factors involved in the MAC program are linked to resilience processes. Arts programming can provide opportunities for youth who have experienced trauma to feel safe enough to engage in self-expression and build corresponding skills that promote feelings of self-efficacy. Building these protective factors thereby strengthens children’s capacity for resilience. Accordingly, the theory of change articulates program activities and processes that promote these outcomes among participating youth. Program directors may draw on the theory of change for strategic planning and evaluation efforts assessing the program’s processes and corresponding impact.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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My Academic Community Engaged Learning Design: Promoting Equitable Civic Engagement

Description

College students are motivated, passionate, and knowledgeable individuals who lack opportunities and the appropriate first-hand experience to get involved in their local community. I used an Academic Community Engaged Learning (ACEL) approach to build student self- efficacy to engage with

College students are motivated, passionate, and knowledgeable individuals who lack opportunities and the appropriate first-hand experience to get involved in their local community. I used an Academic Community Engaged Learning (ACEL) approach to build student self- efficacy to engage with their community. I created a formal curriculum that teaches students the basics of community development and encourages students to consider their role and impact in the community. I organized a community project with a local elementary school to create a kindness mural that would give students an opportunity to experience community engagement, thereby facilitating deeper comprehension of the material. I find that ACEL can be a valuable tool in harnessing college students by using their motivation and passion to facilitate a collaborative process.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Jumping in with Both Feet: How Involvement and Use of Resources Relates to College Freshmen's Satisfaction and GPA

Description

Researchers suggests that college students' involvement and use of resources on campus are important for success, in the form of satisfaction and GPA, in the first year. College officials invest substantial resources in activities to encourage freshmen students to become

Researchers suggests that college students' involvement and use of resources on campus are important for success, in the form of satisfaction and GPA, in the first year. College officials invest substantial resources in activities to encourage freshmen students to become involved in campus activities and utilize resources that promote successful outcomes, yet we do not know which activities best relate to success. Using a self-report survey, we sought to corroborate previous research that has shown that overall levels of involvement and use of resources relate to satisfaction/GPA. Furthermore, we disentangled which individual types of involvement and use of resources are most highly correlated with satisfaction and GPA. And finally, we identified the barriers and benefits to involvement and resource use, according to the students themselves. We found evidence that higher levels of involvement were related to satisfaction and attending faculty office hours appears to be particularly important, given a significant relation to both satisfaction and GPA. Implications for program promotion and resource allocation are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
2017-12

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Connecting to the Community: A Needs Assessment of Families and Early Childhood Professionals

Description

The Paradise Valley Family Resource Center (PVFRC) is a not for profit, community based organization funded by First Things First and a part of the Paradise Valley Unified School District (PVUSD) in Phoenix, Arizona. The mission of this organization is

The Paradise Valley Family Resource Center (PVFRC) is a not for profit, community based organization funded by First Things First and a part of the Paradise Valley Unified School District (PVUSD) in Phoenix, Arizona. The mission of this organization is to connect and strengthen families with children from birth to five years old in the Phoenix valley. The PVFRC longed to be more cognizant of what the needs of the community they serve are, and how they, as an organization, can administer programs of value to the community. Hence, the PVFRC entered a partnership with the Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) program at Arizona State University to develop a research proposal to improve their effectiveness and efficiency at achieving their mission. The purpose of this research project was to identify and evaluate the needs of the families with children ages birth to five within the community, to improve upon existing programs and services or to implement new programs, and to discover more effective modes of awareness and advertisement to the community about the programs and services the PVFRC provides. The main research questions of the experiment included asking participants about what programs and services they need, wish, or want to exist at the PVFRC, what barriers or gaps they see or experience regarding attending the PVFRC, how did participants learn about the PVFRC, and what are the best ways to contact families in their community. The methods of the research included conducting focus group interviews with families who utilize the programs and services at the PVFRC and with early childhood professionals in the Paradise Valley Unified School District (PVUSD), which included social workers and preschool teachers. A total of 25 participants were interviewed (10 families, 6 social workers, and 9 preschool teachers) and responses from the interviews were coded by the researcher. The results of the research was that the PVFRC is meeting many needs and current families are satisfied, participants desire some changes to current programs and services, and the best modes of advertisement and awareness were "word of mouth" and the internet. It was recommended that in order to better achieve their mission, it is advised that the PVFRC make appropriate changes to programs and services as suggested by the participants, connect with mom's or parents groups in the community, collaborate with preschool teachers on the front line, and increase their online presence through the use of social media and their website.

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Created

Date Created
2016-05

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The Relation Between Religiosity and Growth Mindset and the Moderating Factor of Locus of Control

Description

We know that growth and failure-enhancing mindsets and their benefits have been well defined in prior research. However, correlates and mechanisms to developing these mindsets have been understudied. A possible predictor of growth and failure enhancing mindsets is religiosity. We

We know that growth and failure-enhancing mindsets and their benefits have been well defined in prior research. However, correlates and mechanisms to developing these mindsets have been understudied. A possible predictor of growth and failure enhancing mindsets is religiosity. We surveyed 353 students at Arizona State University on religiosity, growth mindset, and failure-enhancing mindset to see if religiosity holds any significant relation to growth and failure enhancing mindsets. We also included locus of control as a possible interaction in the model. Results suggest that there is a difference between religious and non-religious participants in their levels of growth mindset beliefs, with religious participants reporting higher growth mindset beliefs. Additionally, religiosity for Christ-based participants positively predicted growth mindset, but not failure-enhancing mindset. Future research should continue to probe the interaction between religiosity and locus of control, as well as compare different faiths and religious subgroups.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Civic Engagement through Art: Cross culture examination of mural projects as a service learning intervention targeting youth

Description

Utilizing a participatory action research methodology, adolescent participants from two unique populations were challenged to identify salient social justice issues and explore the community impacts of these topics through collaborative artistic expression. The study’s population consisted of 32 adolescents (Phoenix

Utilizing a participatory action research methodology, adolescent participants from two unique populations were challenged to identify salient social justice issues and explore the community impacts of these topics through collaborative artistic expression. The study’s population consisted of 32 adolescents (Phoenix sample n=8; Belfast sample n=24). This research investigates underserved adolescent attitudes and beliefs about civic engagement and how they view their roles in their communities. Youth from both groups reported an increased interest in pro-social behaviors after participation in this service-learning experience (Phoenix sample: 66%, Belfast sample: 75%). Though the youth were from different backgrounds, both groups identified with feelings of inequality stemming from various social forces. They both also expressed desires for spaces to talk about social justice issues they believe in and want to impact. Implications of this research are discussed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Cultural Competency in Child Life: Is There a Gap Between Cultures in Pediatric Care That We Can Fill?

Description

Intercultural competency is becoming more crucial for effective communication as the world becomes more global and interconnected. This issue is particularly true in health care settings, where effective communication is essential for providing the best care possible. There is very

Intercultural competency is becoming more crucial for effective communication as the world becomes more global and interconnected. This issue is particularly true in health care settings, where effective communication is essential for providing the best care possible. There is very little research about intercultural competence training for Child Life Specialists whose primary role is to communicate with the patients and parents. The purposes of this study was to investigate 1) the levels of cultural competency training Child Life Specialists (CLSs) report having received, as well as their interest in more training, 2) assessing the extent to which CLSs are providing culturally competent care (self-reported), 3) understanding the extent to which barriers to providing culturally competent care are present, 4) identifying relations between culturally competent practice, barriers, and perceived feelings of success, and 5) determining whether there are group differences on culturally competent practice, barriers, and perceived feelings of success between those who reported having received training and those who reported no training. A total of 42 Child Life Specialists completed an online survey. Results indicated a variety of training experiences, with those reporting more training perceiving fewer barriers to culturally competent care. A strong interest in more training was also revealed.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2020-12

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Examining Child-Centered and Direct Instruction Approaches to Early Education

Description

The majority of early education programs today use a mix of child-centered and direct instruction approaches. Existing research comparing educational approaches is limited in the degree to which it can inform practice in mixed-method classrooms (i.e., classrooms using both child-centered

The majority of early education programs today use a mix of child-centered and direct instruction approaches. Existing research comparing educational approaches is limited in the degree to which it can inform practice in mixed-method classrooms (i.e., classrooms using both child-centered and direct instruction approaches). The current dissertation extended previous research examining child-centered and direct instruction approaches to early education in two studies. The first study explored how free play and guided play differ from one another. The second study examined how time spent in free play, guided play, and direct instruction in the fall related to children's school readiness in the spring. Both studies were conducted using mixed-method Head Start classrooms. Participants were preschool children (Study 1 n = 284, Study 2 n = 283; M age = 52 months, 48% girls, 70% Mexican or Mexican-American) from lower socioeconomic status families. Observational data were utilized to assess children's time spent in free play and guided play and experiences with activities and peers in each context. Children's academic, affective, and social readiness were assessed through child interviews and teacher reports. The results provided little evidence to support the hypotheses or the popularly held belief that guided play is the most beneficial context for learning and development in early education programs. Findings were discussed in terms of the strengths and limitations of the studies and directions for future research. Importantly, recommendations for policy and practice were provided.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2014

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Recommendations of nursing interventions that promote development in chronically ill and hospitalized infants

Description

Hospitalized and chronically ill infants are at risk for motor, cognitive, and social developmental delays. Nurses have an important role in supporting infant and family development to mitigate these delays. A literature review was performed to identify nursing interventions that

Hospitalized and chronically ill infants are at risk for motor, cognitive, and social developmental delays. Nurses have an important role in supporting infant and family development to mitigate these delays. A literature review was performed to identify nursing interventions that promote development in these three categories. After literature was selected, critical appraisals were performed to assess the quality of evidence. Breast feeding, early cognitive-motor intervention, and family centered care were found to be beneficial for promoting motor development. Maternal scaffolding, responsive-didactic caregiving, and skin-to-skin contact are recommended nursing interventions for cognitive development. Lastly, integration of music is the nursing intervention recommended to promote social development.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Tide Pods and Teenagers: The Psychology of Risk-Taking in Young Adults

Description

The worldwide involvement and the detrimental impact of viral online challenges are distinct features that create a growing societal concern for young people. This study used an exploratory approach to investigate factors that predict young adult’s participation in viral online

The worldwide involvement and the detrimental impact of viral online challenges are distinct features that create a growing societal concern for young people. This study used an exploratory approach to investigate factors that predict young adult’s participation in viral online challenges. Specifically, the study analyzed the extent to which age, personality, social media use, and psychological motives (i.e., social connectedness and online self-concept) predicted participation in viral online challenges in a sample of 18- to 25-year-old college students. In a correlational, cross-sectional online survey, participants completed measures of the Big Five personality traits, degree of social media use, social media engagement, and motives, as well as attitudes and behaviors related to internet challenges. I tested two multiple regression models to investigate key predictors of attitudes and participation in viral online challenges. I found that age, degree of social media use, and social media engagement predicted differences in participants’ familiarity with and likelihood of having taken part in specific online challenges. In addition, social media use and engagement and social connectedness were significant positive predictors of participants’ scores on a measure of attitudes surrounding viral online challenges. Whereas the Big Five personality trait of conscientiousness was a significant negative predictor of attitudes about viral online challenges, there was little evidence overall of a link between the Big Five personality traits and participation in viral online challenges. Limitations of the present study and directions for future research are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
2022-05