Matching Items (159)

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How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget?

Description

How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget? is a art installation created by Christine Adams showcasing printmaking media, including lithography and etching. This installation was based on

How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget? is a art installation created by Christine Adams showcasing printmaking media, including lithography and etching. This installation was based on Adams' childhood bedroom and featured small bedroom shrines, a common motif throughout girlhood. The portraits of the people in the show are all individuals who Adams met between the ages of 13 and 21 and who have left her life, commenting on whether or not someone can ever really leave you.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Full Disclosure: A BFA Painting Exhibition Documenting the Transformative Nature of Art Therapy

Description

Full Disclosure, an honors thesis painting exhibition presented by Bachelor of Fine Arts candidate, Natalie Saez, strives to visually document the mental progression of people undergoing the transformative process of

Full Disclosure, an honors thesis painting exhibition presented by Bachelor of Fine Arts candidate, Natalie Saez, strives to visually document the mental progression of people undergoing the transformative process of art therapy. Although often times a term that brings people on edge under certain circumstances, full disclosure brings to light information that otherwise would not have been expressed. In this same way, the process of art making - specifically referring to art therapy - presents a form of full disclosure. Varying stylistic approaches ranging from naturalistic to more abstracted portraits within the exhibition serve as a way to depict the uninhibited expression that results from the creative process.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Information Comprehension and Retention in the Digital Age

Description

This study looked at college-age students' ability to comprehend and retain information learned from news articles depending on what platform they read from. Fifteen participants read three local New York

This study looked at college-age students' ability to comprehend and retain information learned from news articles depending on what platform they read from. Fifteen participants read three local New York Times articles on each of the platforms provided: iPad, laptop, and paper. They took one test immediately after to test comprehension and another two weeks later to test their retention. Participants were also asked if they found the articles interesting, enjoyable, clear, etc. Results showed that participants' views on each format had little, if any, affect on their number of correct responses. The most consistent results on the participants' perceptions of the formats came from the laptop and paper, whereas the iPad received a bimodal pattern of responses. Participants were also asked to share their news habits while taking the test by selecting how frequently they gain news from various sources such as social media or television. These habits also seemed to have very little effect on their scores.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

Deus Ex Machina

Description

Deus Ex Machina was a group exhibition of works by honors candidate Kenosha Drucker and her Herberger institute colleagues Nicholas Gutierrez and Alyssa Burke. The show was a mixed media installation featuring video, printmaking, sculpture, painting, and drawing.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

Why We Bend, A Multimedia Art Exhibition

Description

‘why we bend' a Bachelor of Fine Arts honors thesis exhibition by Ximenna Hofsetz and Tiernan Warner brings together installation, digital, sculptural, and printed artwork. The main focus concerns

‘why we bend' a Bachelor of Fine Arts honors thesis exhibition by Ximenna Hofsetz and Tiernan Warner brings together installation, digital, sculptural, and printed artwork. The main focus concerns memory; and its vague, formless, and hazy nature. The work also examines what would happen if cognitive space could be physically mapped? What would it look like in sculptural form? Memory erodes and distorts with time. We influence our memories as much as they affect us. Thus, just as relationships are ever-changing, and our memories of those we interact with constantly shifting, our relationships with our own memories are malleable and evolve through time. This transient nature of memory is depicted in the various stylistic means of this exhibition by referencing time and space as well as personal memories and ephemera in both concrete and abstract ways. ‘why we bend’ implements a variety of multimedia techniques to examine recollection and its hold on us.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Tripoli Shores

Description

Whitney Nicoson’s Honors thesis exhibition, Tripoli Shores, is a collection of photographs that stems from an initial interest in portraiture—a desire to observe and render the change of identity shown

Whitney Nicoson’s Honors thesis exhibition, Tripoli Shores, is a collection of photographs that stems from an initial interest in portraiture—a desire to observe and render the change of identity shown by the artist and her mother during a particularly difficult period in their lives. While experiencing paralleling hardships, the two spent time together living at her grandfather’s cottages along the St Lawrence River in Upstate NY. The traditional notion of portraiture gradually grew beyond the representation of self to the documentation of the space. This space was once the epitome of structure, stability, and strength. Over the years, neglect and disrepair caused an inevitable breakdown in the structure. Nicoson seeks to create a permanent documentation of a home that is changing. With an interest in how the photographs of space relates to the change seen in the artist and her mother, the exhibition pursues the idea of forming identity in a place that is also forming its own.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Elizabeth Banks: Gender, Class, and Performativity in Journalism

Description

This thesis in partial fulfillment of my degree from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University delves into the career and viewpoints of Elizabeth Banks, a nineteenth-century American journalist

This thesis in partial fulfillment of my degree from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University delves into the career and viewpoints of Elizabeth Banks, a nineteenth-century American journalist who traveled to London in the 1890s to write about differences between American and British culture and lifestyles. Her three books include Campaigns of Curiosity: Journalistic Adventures of an American Girl in London (1894), The Autobiography of a "Newspaper Girl" (1902), and The Remaking of an American (1928). Banks asked that all of her personal documents be destroyed after her death, so these published books serve as the only remnant of her transatlantic life. With that in mind, I approached the documents with the idea that Banks chose what to include, what to exclude, and how to present her persona as opposed to giving a complete, unbiased picture. Banks used these books to formulate a public identity that served her purposes, which makes sense considering she needed the approval of her readership in order to subsist financially. The contradictions among the three works, and even within each individual work, allowed Banks to appear nonthreatening to the status quo, but still interesting enough to deserve attention. While the context of her environment experienced changes, so did her public "performance." She altered her image in conjunction with what she identified as important to her readers. I rely on a careful reading of her three published books, contextualized with secondary sources to understand how Elizabeth Banks constructed a public identity during a time characterized by social shifts, especially due to the rise of the women's movement, an interest in access to rights previously reserved for men, and reevaluation of the relationship between the social classes. This thesis takes an interdisciplinary approach that utilizes concepts from women and gender studies to better analyze Banks and her lived experiences. While other research on Elizabeth Banks reaches the same conclusions I do, and while other historians have identified Banks's public character as complex and contradictory, this work focuses specifically on how these contradictions operated. By placing portions of her works directly alongside one another, and by analyzing exactly how she incorporated differing ideologies into her pieces, her public identity can be more fully understood as multifaceted and existing in relation to society's changing demands. Also, this thesis considers the importance of the social constructs of class and gender to Banks's identity. The first chapter focuses on gender and her experience as a woman journalist. The second chapter deals with class politics as they impacted her work. Even though I address these social identities in separate chapters, I approached Banks with intersectionality in mind, as Banks's experience of gender is related to class, and vice versa. Elizabeth Banks crafted her public identity in conjunction to public opinion. She knew that she required the approval of her readers. By policing boundaries created by gender and class, she appears as an outsider looking in. She blurs the lines between masculine and feminine and middle class and working class. She does not firmly set herself in any one group, which allowed her to expand her appeal. This analysis of Banks illuminates how a woman could effectively navigate the public arena in nineteenth-century England.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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YOU GOTTA RUN BEFORE YOU CAN WALK: Creating a Guide for the Future of Student Media at Arizona State University

Description

For our thesis we will create a comprehensive journalistic manual for The State Press employees that details the standards of each section and also offer tips on ways to further

For our thesis we will create a comprehensive journalistic manual for The State Press employees that details the standards of each section and also offer tips on ways to further develop communication and quality. We will offer methods for streamlining the writing and editing process so that writers are fully aware of the standards that need to be met in order to be published. As ASU Student Media makes a move to increase its digital presence, a strong voice is necessary. Creativity is at the heart of every great online product, be it through writing, visuals or both. By instilling a culture of accountability through this manual and its rules, we will start building a staff capable of producing a high quality, digitally focused online product in years to come.

In making a State Press manual we hope to increase the excellence and performance of the media entity year after year and to urge students to develop a commitment to ethical and professional values of journalism. We also aim to solidify the entire staff’s knowledge of journalism writing and create an educational workplace for employees who are interested in growing. The guide will provide a foundation to train and instruct for each State Press section, which will ease the pressure put on the editors and will allow more time for constructive direction.

We want to make the production/editing process — from the initial brainstorming of an article to the final publication — a logical and fluid sequence.

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Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Origins

Description

Origins is a creative project that consisted of developing a cohesive body of artwork and mounting an exhibition of that work. My work approaches the question of origins from a

Origins is a creative project that consisted of developing a cohesive body of artwork and mounting an exhibition of that work. My work approaches the question of origins from a scientific point of view, visually investigating stories of microbiological growth decay and evolution. I use color, texture, and shape to describe these narratives while also examining the ways in which humans can see these organisms.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05