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Description

This autobiographical project provides a window into the author's life during military and college years. The project contains two components. First, a memoir that encompasses the author's personal experiences in the Israeli Defense Forces and later at Arizona State University.

This autobiographical project provides a window into the author's life during military and college years. The project contains two components. First, a memoir that encompasses the author's personal experiences in the Israeli Defense Forces and later at Arizona State University. The second component is a critical piece that covers the origins of this project, writing influences, thematic tones, and ideas for future compositions.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Ethical Considerations in ASU Study Abroad Programs

Description

This thesis project examines the ethical considerations within study abroad programs at Arizona State University through the use of a survey of past study abroad students and analysis of research in the field. Topics of consideration include environmental impact and

This thesis project examines the ethical considerations within study abroad programs at Arizona State University through the use of a survey of past study abroad students and analysis of research in the field. Topics of consideration include environmental impact and sustainability, impact on local economies, history and current events of the host country, laws and rights of the students, politics and religion, and social norms, values, and beliefs, among others. Through this analysis, a pre-departure guide has been created in order to ensure that topics of responsible travel are easily accessible to students in study abroad programs.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Project BandAid: An Analysis of Preventive Health Knowledge Retention Among Elementary Students in Phoenix

Description

Within our current educational infrastructure, there’s a lack of substantial preventive care knowledge present among elementary schoolchildren. With education cuts occurring statewide, many schools are left impoverished and schools are incapable of implementing various programs to benefit their local communities.

Within our current educational infrastructure, there’s a lack of substantial preventive care knowledge present among elementary schoolchildren. With education cuts occurring statewide, many schools are left impoverished and schools are incapable of implementing various programs to benefit their local communities. This endeavor aims to visit public and charter elementary schools in the Phoenix Valley to educate youth regarding easily avoidable health risks by implementing healthy eating habits and exercise. Project BandAid will immerse students ages 7-9 in hands-on activities to enhance their knowledge on hygiene, healthy eating habits, and safety. This project incorporated funding from the Woodside Community Action Grant and Barrett, the Honors College as well as the help from Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED) volunteers.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

Zen and the Art of Bicycle Maintenance: An Examination of Bicycle Touring

Description

A bicycle tour is an unusual thing, one that often defies the expectations of the first-time touring cyclist. In this report, the experience of touring cycling is examined in two parts: a narrative documenting the author's tour down the Pacific

A bicycle tour is an unusual thing, one that often defies the expectations of the first-time touring cyclist. In this report, the experience of touring cycling is examined in two parts: a narrative documenting the author's tour down the Pacific Coast, and a reflective work that examines the journey and the major themes which persist throughout. In examining the trip, two major dichotomies arose as themes. The first major dichotomy is found in the expectation of a solitary experience for one who is touring solo. In reality, tours are often built on the goodwill of others in the cycling community. On this particular tour, a website called Warmshowers was central to this point. By offering lodging to tired touring cyclists who would otherwise camp alone, this website serves to bring the cycling community together, and allows for connections that would otherwise never exist to be formed. However, it is true that much of a solo tour is, in fact, spent in solitude. This allows a cyclist long periods for self-reflection and meditation, an opportunity to strengthen one's connection with oneself and the natural world around them. The second is a contrast between the planning that goes into embarking on a long trip and the entropy and randomness that inevitably causes the experience to wildly differ from said plan. When the unexpected occurs, there are two options: to reject the unknown and cling to the framework one sets out for themselves, or to embrace the unexpected and see where it takes you. Often, diverting from the plan can allow for new and exciting experiences. However, there is also value to the framework and stability afforded by adhering to a plan. Through these experiences and more, a bicycle tour changes the way one looks at the world.

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Date Created
2018-05

Did He Kill the Mockingbird?

Description

Did He Kill the Mockingbird? is a play I wrote, which explores the effects of being on the Autism Spectrum plays in Arthur Radley’s life. Arthur Radley is a very misunderstood member of Maycomb County, who is constantly seen as

Did He Kill the Mockingbird? is a play I wrote, which explores the effects of being on the Autism Spectrum plays in Arthur Radley’s life. Arthur Radley is a very misunderstood member of Maycomb County, who is constantly seen as a lesser member of society in Maycomb County.

Did He Kill the Mockingbird? provides an alternate ending to To Kill a Mockingbird. In the original play, the townspeople never discovered that Arthur Radley killed Bob Ewell. In Did He Kill the Mockingbird? a townsperson overhears Atticus Finch and Heck Tate discussing Bob Ewell's death. This leads the townsperson to tell others in Maycomb County of the events that had unfolded the night Bob Ewell died.
As the play progresses, we explore how ignorance, willful and not, change the daily lives and actions of individuals who have mental illnesses and disabilities such as Autism. The townspeople may not see a problem with the way they treat Arthur Radley, as he is just a man who they believe stabbed his mother. However, in reality, they are causing more harm by encouraging and perpetuating rumors about Arthur Radley. In turn, the rumors enhance the stigma that plagues Arthur Radley.
Jean Louise Finch is the main character in Did he Kill the Mockingbird? Jean supports Arthur Radley, and is able to see the good in him although the rest of the townspeople continue to believe he is a bad person.

I hope that my version of this alternative ending to original play brings to light the changes that we need to make as a society to encourage the acceptance of all people. As a society, we need to treat all people, whether disabled or not, as equals. Rather than perpetuating stereotypes, we need to encourage everyone to work hard and reach for their goals whatever they may be.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

Children's Book: Scientists Breaking Boundaries

Description

The Scientist in Me is an original children’s book, authored by Annmarie Barton and illustrated by Alison Lane, that explores the lives and specialties of five remarkable scientists from historically underrepresented backgrounds: Mary Anning, James Pollack, Temple Grandin, Percy Lavon

The Scientist in Me is an original children’s book, authored by Annmarie Barton and illustrated by Alison Lane, that explores the lives and specialties of five remarkable scientists from historically underrepresented backgrounds: Mary Anning, James Pollack, Temple Grandin, Percy Lavon Julian, and Ayah Bdeir. In the book, each scientist has an “Experiment” section that is meant to encourage children to immerse themselves in activities relating to the scientists’ areas of study. We believe that diversity in science is crucial for advancement, and therefore hope to inspire the next generation of scientists through immersion and representation.

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Created

Date Created
2020-05

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Filling a Body That's Yours: a Consideration of Identity, Queerness, and Mental Illness

Description

"Filling a Body That's Yours" is a collection of poetry that celebrates queer survival and the fluidity and mutability of identity. The poems arise from personal experience and expand to the universal in order to question and critique constructs of

"Filling a Body That's Yours" is a collection of poetry that celebrates queer survival and the fluidity and mutability of identity. The poems arise from personal experience and expand to the universal in order to question and critique constructs of mental illness, queerness, transness, and identity. Via intuitive imagistic shifts, unexpected language, and urgent vulnerability, the poems share a personal account of mental illness and treatment, and set out to critique the mental health industrial complex and shortcomings in language, psychiatry, and psychology. For this project, the collection of poems is coupled with a written analytical component that discusses the personal and theoretical backgrounds for the work, as well as poetics and influences. The essay specifically addresses three main themes that appear in the poems: queerness/gender, mental illness and treatment, and identity, using theorists such as Judith Butler and David Hume. Further, the essay provides personal background for the work and discusses poetic influences such as Sylvia Plath, Li-Young Lee, Claudia Rankine, and Norman Dubie. Both the poems and the essay, while addressing these themes, attempt to ask and examine questions such as: "Is my gender entirely mine? Was it thrust wholly or in part upon me? Do I choose to claim queerness, or is it innate?" In asking these questions, the poems challenge readers to consider how they came to understand their bodies as gendered, and what political ends their identities may serve. Ultimately, the poems and their theoretical counterparts complicate constructs we commonly accept as essential givens, and meditate upon timeless existential questions in new, visceral ways.

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Created

Date Created
2017-05