Matching Items (100)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

132430-Thumbnail Image.png

Twitch Streamer-Game Recommender System

Description

Abstract
Matrix Factorization techniques have been proven to be more effective in recommender systems than standard user based or item based methods. Using this knowledge, Funk SVD and SVD++ are compared by the accuracy of their predictions of Twitch streamer

Abstract
Matrix Factorization techniques have been proven to be more effective in recommender systems than standard user based or item based methods. Using this knowledge, Funk SVD and SVD++ are compared by the accuracy of their predictions of Twitch streamer data.

Introduction
As watching video games is becoming more popular, those interested are becoming interested in Twitch.tv, an online platform for guests to watch streamers play video games and interact with them. A streamer is an person who broadcasts them-self playing a video game or some other thing for an audience (the guests of the website.) The site allows the guest to first select the game/category to view and then displays currently active streamers for the guest to select and watch. Twitch records the games that a streamer plays along with the amount of time that a streamer spends streaming that game. This is how the score is generated for a streamer’s game. These three terms form the streamer-game-score (user-item-rating) tuples that we use to train out models.
The our problem’s solution is similar to the purpose of the Netflix prize; however, as opposed to suggesting a user a movie, the goal is to suggest a user a game. We built a model to predict the score that a streamer will have for a game. The score field in our data is fundamentally different from a movie rating in Netflix because the way a user influences a game’s score is by actively streaming it, not by giving it an score based off opinion. The dataset being used it the Twitch.tv dataset provided by Isaac Jones [1]. Also, the only data used in training the models is in the form of the streamer-game-score (user-item-rating) tuples. It will be known if these data points with limited information will be able to give an accurate prediction of a streamer’s score for a game. SVD and SVD++ are the baseis of the models being trained and tested. Scikit’s Surprise library in Python3 is used for the implementation of the models.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

133525-Thumbnail Image.png

An Assessment of the Performance of Machine Learning Techniques When Applied to Trajectory Optimization

Description

Prior research has confirmed that supervised learning is an effective alternative to computationally costly numerical analysis. Motivated by NASA's use of abort scenario matrices to aid in mission operations and planning, this paper applies supervised learning to trajectory optimization in

Prior research has confirmed that supervised learning is an effective alternative to computationally costly numerical analysis. Motivated by NASA's use of abort scenario matrices to aid in mission operations and planning, this paper applies supervised learning to trajectory optimization in an effort to assess the accuracy of a less time-consuming method of producing the magnitude of delta-v vectors required to abort from various points along a Near Rectilinear Halo Orbit. Although the utility of the study is limited, the accuracy of the delta-v predictions made by a Gaussian regression model is fairly accurate after a relatively swift computation time, paving the way for more concentrated studies of this nature in the future.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

132930-Thumbnail Image.png

Understanding User Privacy Issues: Publishing User Data with Privacy in Mind

Description

The explosive Web growth in the last decade has drastically changed the way billions of people all around the globe conduct numerous activities including creating, sharing, and consuming information. The massive amount of user-generated information encourages companies and service providers

The explosive Web growth in the last decade has drastically changed the way billions of people all around the globe conduct numerous activities including creating, sharing, and consuming information. The massive amount of user-generated information encourages companies and service providers to collect users' information and use it in order to better their own goals and then further provide personalized services to users as well. However, the users' information contains their private and sensitive information and can lead to breach of users' privacy. Anonymizing users' information before publishing and using such data is vital in securing their privacy. Due to the many forms of user information (e.g., structural, interactions, etc), different techniques are required for anonymization of users' data. In this thesis, first we discuss different anonymization techniques for various types of user-generated data, i.e., network graphs, web browsing history, and user-item interactions. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of such techniques for data anonymization. Then, we briefly touch on securely and privately sharing information through blockchains.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2019-05

133574-Thumbnail Image.png

Comparison of sentiment analysis systems and an application in signed link prediction

Description

Social media sites are platforms in which individuals discuss a wide range of topics and share a huge amount of information about themselves and their interests. So much of this information is encoded through unstructured text that users post on

Social media sites are platforms in which individuals discuss a wide range of topics and share a huge amount of information about themselves and their interests. So much of this information is encoded through unstructured text that users post on the these types of sites. There has been a considerable amount of work done in respect to sentiment analysis on these sites to infer users' opinions and preferences. However there is a gap where it may be difficult to infer how a user feels about particular pages or topics that they have not conveyed their sentiment for in a observable form. Collaborative filtering is a common method used to solve this problem with user data, but has only infrequently been used with sentiment information in order to make inferences about users preferences. In this paper we extend previous work on leveraging sentiment in collaborative filtering, specifically to approximate user sentiment and subsequently their vote for candidates in an online election. Sentiment is shown to be an effective tool for making these types of predictions in the absence of other more explicit user preference information. In addition to this, we present an evaluation of sentiment analysis methods and tools that are used in state of the art sentiment analysis systems in order to understand which of these methods to leverage in our experiments.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

134317-Thumbnail Image.png

Modeling Fantasy Baseball Player Popularity Using Twitter Activity

Description

Social media is used by people every day to discuss the nuances of their lives. Major League Baseball (MLB) is a popular sport in the United States, and as such has generated a great deal of activity on Twitter. As

Social media is used by people every day to discuss the nuances of their lives. Major League Baseball (MLB) is a popular sport in the United States, and as such has generated a great deal of activity on Twitter. As fantasy baseball continues to grow in popularity, so does the research into better algorithms for picking players. Most of the research done in this area focuses on improving the prediction of a player's individual performance. However, the crowd-sourcing power afforded by social media may enable more informed predictions about players' performances. Players are chosen by popularity and personal preferences by most amateur gamblers. While some of these trends (particularly the long-term ones) are captured by ranking systems, this research was focused on predicting the daily spikes in popularity (and therefore price or draft order) by comparing the number of mentions that the player received on Twitter compared to their previous mentions. In doing so, it was demonstrated that improved fantasy baseball predictions can be made through leveraging social media data.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2017-05

133932-Thumbnail Image.png

How Fake News Spreads in the U.S: A Geographic Visualization System for Misinformation

Description

The spread of fake news (rumors) has been a growing problem on the internet in the past few years due to the increase of social media services. People share fake news articles on social media sometimes without knowing that those

The spread of fake news (rumors) has been a growing problem on the internet in the past few years due to the increase of social media services. People share fake news articles on social media sometimes without knowing that those articles contain false information. Not knowing whether an article is fake or real is a problem because it causes social media news to lose credibility. Prior research on fake news has focused on how to detect fake news, but efforts towards controlling fake news articles on the internet are still facing challenges. Some of these challenges include; it is hard to collect large sets of fake news data, it is hard to collect locations of people who are spreading fake news, and it is difficult to study the geographic distribution of fake news. To address these challenges, I am examining how fake news spreads in the United States (US) by developing a geographic visualization system for misinformation. I am collecting a set of fake news articles from a website called snopes.com. After collecting these articles I am extracting the keywords from each article and storing them in a file. I then use the stored keywords to search on Twitter in order to find out the locations of users who spread the rumors. Finally, I mark those locations on a map in order to show the geographic distribution of fake news. Having access to large sets of fake news data, knowing the locations of people who are spreading fake news, and being able to understand the geographic distribution of fake news will help in the efforts towards addressing the fake news problem on the internet by providing target areas.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

133143-Thumbnail Image.png

Analysis of BoostOR: A Twitter Bot Detection Classification Algorithm

Description

The prevalence of bots, or automated accounts, on social media is a well-known problem. Some of the ways bots harm social media users include, but are not limited to, spreading misinformation, influencing topic discussions, and dispersing harmful links. Bots have

The prevalence of bots, or automated accounts, on social media is a well-known problem. Some of the ways bots harm social media users include, but are not limited to, spreading misinformation, influencing topic discussions, and dispersing harmful links. Bots have affected the field of disaster relief on social media as well. These bots cause problems such as preventing rescuers from determining credible calls for help, spreading fake news and other malicious content, and generating large amounts of content which burdens rescuers attempting to provide aid in the aftermath of disasters. To address these problems, this research seeks to detect bots participating in disaster event related discussions and increase the recall, or number of bots removed from the network, of Twitter bot detection methods. The removal of these bots will also prevent human users from accidentally interacting with these bot accounts and being manipulated by them. To accomplish this goal, an existing bot detection classification algorithm known as BoostOR was employed. BoostOR is an ensemble learning algorithm originally modeled to increase bot detection recall in a dataset and it has the possibility to solve the social media bot dilemma where there may be several different types of bots in the data. BoostOR was first introduced as an adjustment to existing ensemble classifiers to increase recall. However, after testing the BoostOR algorithm on unobserved datasets, results showed that BoostOR does not perform as expected. This study attempts to improve the BoostOR algorithm by comparing it with a baseline classification algorithm, AdaBoost, and then discussing the intentional differences between the two. Additionally, this study presents the main factors which contribute to the shortcomings of the BoostOR algorithm and proposes a solution to improve it. These recommendations should ensure that the BoostOR algorithm can be applied to new and unobserved datasets in the future.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-12

129268-Thumbnail Image.png

Addressing the Cold-Start Problem in Location Recommendation Using Geo-Social Correlations

Description

Location-based social networks (LBSNs) have attracted an increasing number of users in recent years, resulting in large amounts of geographical and social data. Such LBSN data provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the human movement from their socio-spatial behavior, in

Location-based social networks (LBSNs) have attracted an increasing number of users in recent years, resulting in large amounts of geographical and social data. Such LBSN data provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the human movement from their socio-spatial behavior, in order to improve location-based applications like location recommendation. As users can check-in at new places, traditional work on location prediction that relies on mining a user’s historical moving trajectories fails as it is not designed for the cold-start problem of recommending new check-ins. While previous work on LBSNs attempting to utilize a user’s social connections for location recommendation observed limited help from social network information. In this work, we propose to address the cold-start location recommendation problem by capturing the correlations between social networks and geographical distance on LBSNs with a geo-social correlation model. The experimental results on a real-world LBSN dataset demonstrate that our approach properly models the geo-social correlations of a user’s cold-start check-ins and significantly improves the location recommendation performance.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2015-03-01

128381-Thumbnail Image.png

Machine Learning to Predict Rapid Progression of Carotid Atherosclerosis in Patients With Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Description

Objectives: Prediabetes is a major epidemic and is associated with adverse cardio-cerebrovascular outcomes. Early identification of patients who will develop rapid progression of atherosclerosis could be beneficial for improved risk stratification. In this paper, we investigate important factors impacting the prediction,

Objectives: Prediabetes is a major epidemic and is associated with adverse cardio-cerebrovascular outcomes. Early identification of patients who will develop rapid progression of atherosclerosis could be beneficial for improved risk stratification. In this paper, we investigate important factors impacting the prediction, using several machine learning methods, of rapid progression of carotid intima-media thickness in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) participants.

Methods: In the Actos Now for Prevention of Diabetes (ACT NOW) study, 382 participants with IGT underwent carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) ultrasound evaluation at baseline and at 15–18 months, and were divided into rapid progressors (RP, n = 39, 58 ± 17.5 μM change) and non-rapid progressors (NRP, n = 343, 5.8 ± 20 μM change, p < 0.001 versus RP). To deal with complex multi-modal data consisting of demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables, we propose a general data-driven framework to investigate the ACT NOW dataset. In particular, we first employed a Fisher Score-based feature selection method to identify the most effective variables and then proposed a probabilistic Bayes-based learning method for the prediction. Comparison of the methods and factors was conducted using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) analyses and Brier score.

Results: The experimental results show that the proposed learning methods performed well in identifying or predicting RP. Among the methods, the performance of Naïve Bayes was the best (AUC 0.797, Brier score 0.085) compared to multilayer perceptron (0.729, 0.086) and random forest (0.642, 0.10). The results also show that feature selection has a significant positive impact on the data prediction performance.

Conclusions: By dealing with multi-modal data, the proposed learning methods show effectiveness in predicting prediabetics at risk for rapid atherosclerosis progression. The proposed framework demonstrated utility in outcome prediction in a typical multidimensional clinical dataset with a relatively small number of subjects, extending the potential utility of machine learning approaches beyond extremely large-scale datasets.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-09-05

128554-Thumbnail Image.png

Directed Dynamical Influence is More Detectable With Noise

Description

Successful identification of directed dynamical influence in complex systems is relevant to significant problems of current interest. Traditional methods based on Granger causality and transfer entropy have issues such as difficulty with nonlinearity and large data requirement. Recently a framework

Successful identification of directed dynamical influence in complex systems is relevant to significant problems of current interest. Traditional methods based on Granger causality and transfer entropy have issues such as difficulty with nonlinearity and large data requirement. Recently a framework based on nonlinear dynamical analysis was proposed to overcome these difficulties. We find, surprisingly, that noise can counterintuitively enhance the detectability of directed dynamical influence. In fact, intentionally injecting a proper amount of asymmetric noise into the available time series has the unexpected benefit of dramatically increasing confidence in ascertaining the directed dynamical influence in the underlying system. This result is established based on both real data and model time series from nonlinear ecosystems. We develop a physical understanding of the beneficial role of noise in enhancing detection of directed dynamical influence.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2016-04-12