Matching Items (2)

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Mining content and relations for social spammer detection

Description

Social networking services have emerged as an important platform for large-scale information sharing and communication. With the growing popularity of social media, spamming has become rampant in the platforms. Complex

Social networking services have emerged as an important platform for large-scale information sharing and communication. With the growing popularity of social media, spamming has become rampant in the platforms. Complex network interactions and evolving content present great challenges for social spammer detection. Different from some existing well-studied platforms, distinct characteristics of newly emerged social media data present new challenges for social spammer detection. First, texts in social media are short and potentially linked with each other via user connections. Second, it is observed that abundant contextual information may play an important role in distinguishing social spammers and normal users. Third, not only the content information but also the social connections in social media evolve very fast. Fourth, it is easy to amass vast quantities of unlabeled data in social media, but would be costly to obtain labels, which are essential for many supervised algorithms. To tackle those challenges raise in social media data, I focused on developing effective and efficient machine learning algorithms for social spammer detection.

I provide a novel and systematic study of social spammer detection in the dissertation. By analyzing the properties of social network and content information, I propose a unified framework for social spammer detection by collectively using the two types of information in social media. Motivated by psychological findings in physical world, I investigate whether sentiment analysis can help spammer detection in online social media. In particular, I conduct an exploratory study to analyze the sentiment differences between spammers and normal users; and present a novel method to incorporate sentiment information into social spammer detection framework. Given the rapidly evolving nature, I propose a novel framework to efficiently reflect the effect of newly emerging social spammers. To tackle the problem of lack of labeling data in social media, I study how to incorporate network information into text content modeling, and design strategies to select the most representative and informative instances from social media for labeling. Motivated by publicly available label information from other media platforms, I propose to make use of knowledge learned from cross-media to help spammer detection on social media.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Learning with attributed networks: algorithms and applications

Description

Attributes - that delineating the properties of data, and connections - that describing the dependencies of data, are two essential components to characterize most real-world phenomena. The synergy between these

Attributes - that delineating the properties of data, and connections - that describing the dependencies of data, are two essential components to characterize most real-world phenomena. The synergy between these two principal elements renders a unique data representation - the attributed networks. In many cases, people are inundated with vast amounts of data that can be structured into attributed networks, and their use has been attractive to researchers and practitioners in different disciplines. For example, in social media, users interact with each other and also post personalized content; in scientific collaboration, researchers cooperate and are distinct from peers by their unique research interests; in complex diseases studies, rich gene expression complements to the gene-regulatory networks. Clearly, attributed networks are ubiquitous and form a critical component of modern information infrastructure. To gain deep insights from such networks, it requires a fundamental understanding of their unique characteristics and be aware of the related computational challenges.

My dissertation research aims to develop a suite of novel learning algorithms to understand, characterize, and gain actionable insights from attributed networks, to benefit high-impact real-world applications. In the first part of this dissertation, I mainly focus on developing learning algorithms for attributed networks in a static environment at two different levels: (i) attribute level - by designing feature selection algorithms to find high-quality features that are tightly correlated with the network topology; and (ii) node level - by presenting network embedding algorithms to learn discriminative node embeddings by preserving node proximity w.r.t. network topology structure and node attribute similarity. As changes are essential components of attributed networks and the results of learning algorithms will become stale over time, in the second part of this dissertation, I propose a family of online algorithms for attributed networks in a dynamic environment to continuously update the learning results on the fly. In fact, developing application-aware learning algorithms is more desired with a clear understanding of the application domains and their unique intents. As such, in the third part of this dissertation, I am also committed to advancing real-world applications on attributed networks by incorporating the objectives of external tasks into the learning process.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019