Matching Items (11)

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The Weight of Trash: Teaching Sustainability and Ecofeminism by Asking Undergraduates to Carry Around Their Own Garbage

Description

This essay outlines a recent assignment I designed for an upper-division cross-listed women and gender studies/social justice and human rights course I teach called, “Trash, Freaks, and SCUM.” In

This essay outlines a recent assignment I designed for an upper-division cross-listed women and gender studies/social justice and human rights course I teach called, “Trash, Freaks, and SCUM.” In the context of the students reading Edward Humes’ (2012) Garbology, the trash bag assignment asked that students carry around their trash for two 48-hour periods and that they present it to the class. While the first two day period assesses their actual trash output, students are asked to produce as little trash as possible for the second two day period. This assignment aims to make trash visible and to help students learn about climate change, sustainability, conspicuous consumption, and how their individual carbon footprint contributes to the “big picture” of environmental strain. I describe this assignment and its goals in this essay, followed by an assessment of its role in teaching about social justice, in order to underscore the importance of experiential learning with trash and to highlight how this assignment fits the mission of my courses on feminism and social justice.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Breaking the Glass Canopy: The Ascension of Women in Colombian Revolutionary Groups

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In previous research, little work was done to understand how and to what extent female combatants in Colombian revolutionary groups functioned as leaders. This paper seeks to assess the agency

In previous research, little work was done to understand how and to what extent female combatants in Colombian revolutionary groups functioned as leaders. This paper seeks to assess the agency that women in Colombian leftist revolutionary organizations such as M-19 and FARC had access to, specifically with regards to leadership. Colombian revolutionary groups failed to successfully incorporate women into higher ranks, despite claiming otherwise. The military structure particularly favors men by esteeming masculine roles and blaming women for the transgressions of men. This paper specifically evaluates the differences between the M-19 and FARC with regards to female leadership. The M-19 more effectively incorporated women into leadership roles than FARC due to differences regarding representation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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‘It’s not really talked about’: Exploring positive and conflicting aspects of being a gay Filipino American man

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Building on past research, this study addresses ways in which gay, Filipino men negotiate their dual minority identities and consider potential conflicts and/or methods in which being a sexual and

Building on past research, this study addresses ways in which gay, Filipino men negotiate their dual minority identities and consider potential conflicts and/or methods in which being a sexual and ethnic minority work together in the development of one’s identity. Through qualitative interviews, this research examines the experience of eleven gay, Filipino men in the Phoenix, AZ and Los Angeles, CA metropolitan areas and explores way in which their identities create stress and conflict, but always ways in which these identities create positivity in relation to their dual minority status.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Mapping the newly menstruating body: Qualitative analysis of teachers' experiences with menstruation education and ""hygiene"" curriculum in elementary schools

Description

Menstruation curricula in elementary schools presents an opportunity to better examine the early teachings about menstruation, as this is often the first time that young people learn about gender difference

Menstruation curricula in elementary schools presents an opportunity to better examine the early teachings about menstruation, as this is often the first time that young people learn about gender difference within school sanctioned curricula. A closer examination of this pedagogical moment from the perspective of educators helps us to understand the dissemination of the shame narrative present in menstrual socialization. Six teachers were interviewed about their experiences with administering the menstrual health curriculum in elementary schools across a large southwest metropolitan area. A discourse analysis of these interviews was completed in order to find themes of language used surrounding menstrual health curriculum. Themes of shame, legislative restrictions on sex education curriculum and personal narratives surrounding menstruation are discussed in addition to the current neo-liberal structure of public health curriculum. Future research into alternative modes of education on menstruation is proposed.

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Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Why I Tell Jokes: Examining Abjection and the Performative Potential of Stand-up Comedy

Description

Stand-up comedy, as a performance art, has a dearth of serious academic literature and exposition. In this paper, I set out to analyze comedy at the edge, what I refer

Stand-up comedy, as a performance art, has a dearth of serious academic literature and exposition. In this paper, I set out to analyze comedy at the edge, what I refer to as abject comedy. I draw on the major performers in this vein of performance to analyze the effects of their material. Also, I use my more than three years experience in the stand-up world to take a sincere look at the power and effectiveness of this brand of comedy. The abject comedian addresses the personally political narrative of self-discovery, social inequality, and performative boundaries to absolve herself of the existing circumstances she perceives as deplorable and unfounded. I show that abject stand-up exhibits realistic performative change in not only the audience and performer, but in society as a whole. Lastly, I seek out my own motivations for performing stand-up comedy and address my personal relationship with humor and audience interaction, finding that I aim to discover truth, establish uncertainty, and test the limits of social boundaries. At the very least, I aim to make the audience question, to make them think. I do not expect my material to always have my personal intended affect on the audience, but making an affect, sparking a question, challenging the individual's accepted conceptual boundaries, these are my reasons for approaching the stage. Baring my self through a microphone on a well lit stage in a dark room for a group of strangers whose acceptance or denial elevates or remands my spirit; this is my pursuit. This is why I tell jokes

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012-12

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Origins, Emotions, and Efficacies: Straight Allies and the Cultural Politics of LGBT Activism

Description

This qualitative research project investigates the contemporary landscape of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) politics and activism, specifically the concept and identities of so-called "straight allies." Through 13 in-depth

This qualitative research project investigates the contemporary landscape of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) politics and activism, specifically the concept and identities of so-called "straight allies." Through 13 in-depth interviews with individuals who identify as straight allies, we explore the ways in which these heterosexuals engage in LGBT politics and activist culture. We take a grounded theory approach to data analysis, through which the concept of "passive" and "active" activism emerges as a potent framework to understand these allies' meaning making practices, as well as how they negotiate the emotional, interpersonal, and mass-mediated complexities of being straight in LGBT communities and politics. Thompson's (2005) theory of "ontological choreography" is used as an interpretive lens to make sense of the heterogeneous knowledges and experiences our participants draw upon to constitute their straight ally identities. Implications for future research on LGBT politics and straight alliance are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Restructuring of Masculinity The Rise of the Bromantic and Homosocial Culture

Description

Friendship between males have grown stronger throughout the last 20 years thanks to the production of buddy and bromance films. These movies have started to separate themselves from labels like

Friendship between males have grown stronger throughout the last 20 years thanks to the production of buddy and bromance films. These movies have started to separate themselves from labels like gay and straight. Feelings are no longer foreign and inaccessible to men, and this has led them to a greater understanding of themselves. Man is currently on the road that woman has been on for many years, that being of close knit friendships that resemble homosexual relationships; and even though this mimicry (or rather appropriation) has come at a much later time, man is now closer than ever to the tipping point for a new masculinity. Through philosophy, sociology, gender studies, social theory, psychoanalysis, and pop culture (specifically film and television) this paper reveals what bromance has already done and could potentially do for man and eventually for humanity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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W.I.T.C.H. and Witchcraft in radical feminist activism

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In this paper, I explore the ways in which the radical feminist activist group W.I.T.C.H. (Women’s International Terrorist Conspiracy from Hell) uses the figure of the witch to establish a

In this paper, I explore the ways in which the radical feminist activist group W.I.T.C.H. (Women’s International Terrorist Conspiracy from Hell) uses the figure of the witch to establish a collective identity as a social movement by using the theoretical framework of identity work. I first draw on the existing scholarship surrounding the history of witchcraft, witch persecution, and radical feminism, and I then apply this history in conjunction with identity work theory to analyze the public persona of the recently revived W.I.T.C.H., specifically the group that brought this movement back: W.I.T.C.H. PDX. By looking at the strategies that W.I.T.C.H. employs in their protest, social media presence, website, and interviews, I examine how W.I.T.C.H. has historically and currently built a collective identity despite being a loosely-connected network of local groups.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Postfeminist distortions: complicated discourses of feminist identity, choice and sexuality

Description

In what has been coined the postfeminist era, successes of the second wave feminist movement have been distorted by sociopolitical and economic structures to proclaim that sexism and inequality no

In what has been coined the postfeminist era, successes of the second wave feminist movement have been distorted by sociopolitical and economic structures to proclaim that sexism and inequality no longer exist within liberal American society, and thus feminism as a movement is no longer necessary. While theoretical and quantitative work has examined women’s relationship with feminist identity, limited research exists on women’s subjective, qualitative accounts of feminist identity. Furthermore, there is a dearth of research on women’s subjective identification across the spectrum of feminist identity, particularly from non-college and non-white populations. Using thematic analysis this study critically analyzed 20 qualitative interviews from a community sample of women in a large Southwest city (Age range: 18-52; Mean age: 35.35, SD: 12.0). Narratives revealed four themes surrounding women’s identification with feminism and conceptions of sexuality: 1) Feminist self-labeling associated with a collective identity 2) Empowerment as a personal endeavor 3) Female empowerment and relationships with men and 4) Investments in femininity and sexual empowerment. This data supports the notion that feminist ideals of equality and agency have been distorted by postfeminist and neoliberal ideology to prevent women from identifying as feminists. Additionally, data postulate that this distortion has permeated ideologies of feminist women, thereby discouraging collective action for change.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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Gender Symbolism and Gender Power Across Time and Contexts: The Irredeemability of Past and Present Sociocultural and Political-Institutional Responses to Women Gender-Based Violence Survivors During National Transition and in Peacetime

Description

In the aftermath of gender-based violence, how do women survivors experience survivorhood and in what ways do entrenched sociopolitical, cultural, and institutional ideologies and structures impede their recovery process? I

In the aftermath of gender-based violence, how do women survivors experience survivorhood and in what ways do entrenched sociopolitical, cultural, and institutional ideologies and structures impede their recovery process? I argue that, in settings of both national unrest and peacetime, women are deprived the opportunities to heal from their trauma in a just and dignified manner as a result of the machinations of gender symbolism and gender power percolating throughout their private and public communities. I investigate the ways in which the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission in the aftermath of national unrest as well as sociocultural communities and academic institutions in peacetime analogously perpetuate defective and markedly androcentric ideologies, structural practices, and rules and regulations that simultaneously disregard women’s needs and interests while maintaining the cycle of impunity for male perpetrators.

I also present an autoethnographic analysis that conceptualizes my personal experience of gender-based violence in a comparative study across sociopolitical contexts to explode the assumption that pandemic gender symbolism, and subsequently inculcated gender power, is only noteworthy in regard to its impact on the levels of global systems and national institutions, as many international policymakers and political science scholars maintain. I likewise subvert the privileged attitudes that trivialize daily gendered experiences as irrelevant, and demonstrate how quotidian forms of gender power – often overlooked in disciplines of political science and legislation – are markedly destructive and whose far-reaching impacts at the local and individual levels are no less consequential than gender power on the international stage.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019