Matching Items (6)

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Enhancing American Resilience: Testing An Alternative Evaluation Method For Governmental Contingency Planning

Description

As the frequency of US-based disasters increases, so does the need for effective governmental contingency planning and improvement. The current, external evaluation method presents several opportunities for improvement, including cost,

As the frequency of US-based disasters increases, so does the need for effective governmental contingency planning and improvement. The current, external evaluation method presents several opportunities for improvement, including cost, efficacy of results, and turnaround time for results. Utilizing a tabletop exercise as it's model, this study designed a self-evaluation tool to test if the data provided by such a tool is similar to the data provided by an external evaluator. After testing it in a government-sanctioned tabletop exercise, the tool showed its ability to be utilized in an exercise and evaluate the participants, based off their perceived success in the exercise. The results of the study indicate a strong, positive correlation between the results of the participant and evaluator populations surveyed as well as statistical equality between the two groups.

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Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Engineering, Border Walls & Wildlife: The Case of the US-Mexico Border

Description

The purpose of this study is to spark a discussion for engineers and their firms to consider the impact of border barriers on wildlife. The focus of this study is

The purpose of this study is to spark a discussion for engineers and their firms to consider the impact of border barriers on wildlife. The focus of this study is to consider if or how engineers make those considerations, such as through design modifications. Barriers block wildlife migration patterns, disabling them from life-sustaining resources. This is particularly important due to an increasing trend in habitat loss, urban development, and climate change. During literature analysis of border barrier impacts, and outreaching to relevant organizations and individuals, there was little to no public documentation or discussion from the engineering community found. Discussion that was found is included in this study, but the lack of connection between conservation and engineering professionals is eminently profound. Therefore, the analysis of studying engineering design considerations additionally studied the relationship between environmental and engineering professionals. Types of research included involves literature analysis of journal articles, reports, project plans for construction, and environmental laws pertinent to wildlife impact.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Assessment of Antibiotic Resistance in a Managed Aquifer Recharge System: Water Sustainability and Water Quality

Description

Managed Aquifer Recharge is an increasingly prevalent solution to sustain water availability in arid regions. Recharge of groundwater resources using treated wastewater effluent is one type of managed aquifer recharge

Managed Aquifer Recharge is an increasingly prevalent solution to sustain water availability in arid regions. Recharge of groundwater resources using treated wastewater effluent is one type of managed aquifer recharge that offers long-term sustainable water management. However, there are some concerns regarding the reuse of wastewater and its potential to increase exposures to antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes that could affect human health. Antibiotic resistance genes can confer the ability for bacteria to resist antibacterial treatment, rendering their presence in water supplies as an area of research needed to evaluate where environmental “hot spots” of potential antibiotic resistance disseminate. To evaluate the occurrence of antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes, sampling of an Arizona managed aquifer recharge facility was performed, with target antibiotic resistance genes measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes was evaluated at several sampling wells and in sediments to examine trade-offs between water quantity benefits and water quality issues. The goal of this work is to inform management operations for secure water quality in the face of climate change.

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Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Food Waste Fertilizer Efficacy

Description

As the world’s population exponentially grows, more food production is required. This increasing food production currently has led to the un-sustainable production of chemical fertilizers and resultant overuse. A more

As the world’s population exponentially grows, more food production is required. This increasing food production currently has led to the un-sustainable production of chemical fertilizers and resultant overuse. A more sustainable option to enhance food production could be the use of fertilizer derived from food waste. To address this, we investigated the possibility of utilizing a fertilizer derived from food waste to grow hydroponic vegetables. Arugula (Eruca sativa) ‘Slow Bolt’ and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) ‘Cherokee’ and ‘Rex’ were cultivated using indoor deep-flow hydroponic systems at 23 ºC under a photosynthetic photon flux density of 170 µmol∙m−2∙s−1 with an 18-hour photoperiod. Plant nutrient solutions were provided by food waste fertilizer or commercial 15:5:20 NPK fertilizer at the identical electrical conductivity (EC) of 2.3 mS·cm–1. At the EC of 2.3 mS·cm–1, chemical fertilizer contained 150 ppm N, 50 ppm P, and 200 ppm K, while food waste fertilizer had 60 ppm N, 26 ppm P, and 119 ppm K. Four weeks after the nutrient treatments were implemented, compared to plants grown with chemical fertilizer, lettuce ‘Rex’ grown with food waste fertilizer had four less leaves, 27.1% shorter leaves, 68.2% and 23.1% less shoot and root fresh weight, respectively. Lettuce ‘Cherokee’ and arugula grown with food waste fertilizer followed a similar trend with fresh shoot weights that were 80.1% and 95.6% less compared to the chemical fertilizer, respectively. In general, the magnitude of reduction in the plant growth was greatest in arugula. These results suggest that both fertilizers were able to successfully grow lettuce and arugula, although the reduced plant growth with the food waste fertilizer in our study is likely from a lower concentration of nutrients when we considered EC as an indicator of nutrient concentration equivalency of the two fertilizer types.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Loving them to Death?: Crowding and the National Park Experience After Desert Solitaire

Description

The national parks are often considered to be one of America’s greatest achievements. Through a rich and sometimes tumultuous history, the national parks have been shaped from unwanted swaths of

The national parks are often considered to be one of America’s greatest achievements. Through a rich and sometimes tumultuous history, the national parks have been shaped from unwanted swaths of land into some of the most famous landscapes in the country. There are ultimately two conflicting goals of the national parks: provide enjoyment for the American people and protect the land. In recent years, increased popularity of the parks has made achieving these dual goals particularly difficult. Crowding in the parks leads to both ecological and social problems that threaten both goals of the national parks. Crowding is a multifaceted issue that must be explored from multiple perspectives.

Using Zion as a case study, the problems of crowding are explored and evaluated. First the history of the national parks is described to determine how the parks were created and popularized. After exploring the history of the parks, crowding in the national parks will be
discussed, including an overview of some of the significant social science literature exploring
crowding and its impact on visitor experience. This analysis will conclude with an examination
of visitor management strategies and an examination of the park-specific literature about the specific problems and decisions confronting managers at Zion National Park. A personal account of a visit to Zion during the peak season will provide a personal narrative about the meaning and purpose of the park experience.

The final section of this thesis will consider a range of opposing views on the philosophy of national parks and the park experience, centering around the ideas of Abbey, to address the deeper questions surrounding the goals of park management as we likely more toward an even more crowded park future. Ultimately the paper concludes that the parks has shifted irrevocably away from the ideals of Abbey, although his voice still provides inspiration to generations of park lovers. Additionally, while hard limits must eventually be set, in an era of increasing human influence, the park experience will need to be redefined to be more expansive and inclusive of all who wish to visit and enjoy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Exploring the Factors of Food Waste

Description

This project evaluates the success that a Food Waste assignment had on reducing food waste by exploring factors that suggest waste minimization. Previous ASB 370/394: Ethics of Eating students were

This project evaluates the success that a Food Waste assignment had on reducing food waste by exploring factors that suggest waste minimization. Previous ASB 370/394: Ethics of Eating students were surveyed regarding their thoughts on their current food waste behavior and what food waste strategies they implemented to reduce their waste. The success of the assignment was determined using SPSS statistical software. Respondents reported that foods that they waste the most were vegetables, fruits, and bread and most respondents indicated that they threw away 1-2 cups of food per week, typically only when they clean out their fridge and/or pantry. Participants revealed the main reasons for their food waste were “I buy too much,” followed by “do not have time to prepare the food I buy,” and “my produce didn’t look appealing anymore.” Based on the results from the survey, over 60% of respondents indicated that they had changed their food waste behavior to produce less waste. The Food Waste Assignment was deemed a success in encouraging students to limit their food waste due to the majority of students indicating they change their behavior after completing the assignment. The three main tactics students implemented to reduce their food waste were: “eating more leftovers,” “proper food storage,” and, “meal planning.” While the Food Waste Assignment was successful, ways to improve the assignment were still identified. To help students address their food waste behavior, reading or videos on ways to prevent food waste or suggestions for students to improve their food waste could be provided.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05