Matching Items (10)

137144-Thumbnail Image.png

How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget?

Description

How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget? is a art installation created by Christine Adams showcasing printmaking media, including lithography and etching. This installation was based on

How Was I to Know You Wouldn't Let Me Forget? is a art installation created by Christine Adams showcasing printmaking media, including lithography and etching. This installation was based on Adams' childhood bedroom and featured small bedroom shrines, a common motif throughout girlhood. The portraits of the people in the show are all individuals who Adams met between the ages of 13 and 21 and who have left her life, commenting on whether or not someone can ever really leave you.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Deus Ex Machina

Description

Deus Ex Machina was a group exhibition of works by honors candidate Kenosha Drucker and her Herberger institute colleagues Nicholas Gutierrez and Alyssa Burke. The show was a mixed media installation featuring video, printmaking, sculpture, painting, and drawing.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Why We Bend, A Multimedia Art Exhibition

Description

‘why we bend' a Bachelor of Fine Arts honors thesis exhibition by Ximenna Hofsetz and Tiernan Warner brings together installation, digital, sculptural, and printed artwork. The main focus concerns

‘why we bend' a Bachelor of Fine Arts honors thesis exhibition by Ximenna Hofsetz and Tiernan Warner brings together installation, digital, sculptural, and printed artwork. The main focus concerns memory; and its vague, formless, and hazy nature. The work also examines what would happen if cognitive space could be physically mapped? What would it look like in sculptural form? Memory erodes and distorts with time. We influence our memories as much as they affect us. Thus, just as relationships are ever-changing, and our memories of those we interact with constantly shifting, our relationships with our own memories are malleable and evolve through time. This transient nature of memory is depicted in the various stylistic means of this exhibition by referencing time and space as well as personal memories and ephemera in both concrete and abstract ways. ‘why we bend’ implements a variety of multimedia techniques to examine recollection and its hold on us.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

Eye of the BeholdHer

Description

Language is powerful. The words we use define our perceptions. They label what we see and paint a picture for those with whom we are communicating. Words serve as heuristic

Language is powerful. The words we use define our perceptions. They label what we see and paint a picture for those with whom we are communicating. Words serve as heuristic when assigning value to an object, experience, or person. My thesis, Eye of the BeholdHer, focuses on the language used in American pop-culture to describe women. I comment on the dehumanization of women through the use of animal names used to describe personality, appearance, and genitalia, as well as the way the English language implies domestication and inferiority of women through the use of the certain words. Examples include, but are not limited to: bitch , chick, pussy, beaver, cougar, catty, heifer, old bat, mousy, foxy, and vixen. Eye of the Behold(her) reflects upon my observations and calls for social change. Eye of the BeholdHer is a call for action. It is time to make conscious word choices and realize the impact words have on shaping our society. It is time for us to empowHer through words.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

You Are Here. BFA Thesis Exhibition

Description

You Are Here is a mixed-media installation, featuring the thesis work of BFA: Intermedia senior, Carissa Kalia Heinrichs. The installation consists of a hanging fabric structure, in which gallery visitors

You Are Here is a mixed-media installation, featuring the thesis work of BFA: Intermedia senior, Carissa Kalia Heinrichs. The installation consists of a hanging fabric structure, in which gallery visitors may interact with by both circumambulating and entering the form, walking alongside ever transforming horizons. The exhibition addresses the re-contextualization of "here", challenging its containment, and inviting viewers to study diverse definitions of home encompassed in a single shared space. The exhibition will encompass the conceptual and technical growth fostered by the artist's academic career at both the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, as well as the Barrett Honors College at Arizona State University.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

Deep roots, shared fruits: Emergent creative process and the ecology of solo performance through "Dress in Something Plain and Dark"

Description

This paper examines creative process and performance as a method of research for understanding self-in-context through the lens of my own artistic research for “Dress in Something Plain and Dark,”

This paper examines creative process and performance as a method of research for understanding self-in-context through the lens of my own artistic research for “Dress in Something Plain and Dark,” a project exploring my relationship as a woman to Mennonite religious and cultural identity, spirituality, and dance. Situating my artistic work in relationship to the fields of creative autoethnography, queer and transborder performance art, and somatic dance practice, I discuss the distinctions and commonalities of approach, methods, and practice of artists working in these fields, and the shared challenges of marginalization, translation, and contextualization. In response to these challenges, and the inadequacy of linear, Western, individualistic and mechanistic frameworks to address them, I draw from the ethnographic work of de la Garza, (formerly González, 2000) to seek a “creation-centered” ontological framework that the artist-researcher-performer may use to understand and contextualize their work. I offer the tree as an ontology to understand the organic, emergent nature of creative process, the stages of growth and seasonal cycles, and the structural parts that make up the creative and performative processes, and illustrate this model through a discussion of the growth of “Dress in Something Plain and Dark,” as it has emerged over two cyclical “seasons” of maturation.

Note: This work of creative scholarship is rooted in collaboration between three female artist-scholars: Carly Bates, Raji Ganesan, and Allyson Yoder. Working from a common intersectional, feminist framework, we served as artistic co-directors of each other’s solo pieces and co-producers of Negotiations, in which we share these pieces alongside each other. Negotiations is not a showcase of three individual works, but a conversation among three voices. As collaborators, we have been uncompromising in the pursuit of our own unique inquiries and voices and each of our works of creative scholarship stand alone. However, we believe that all of the parts are best understood in relationship to each other and to the whole. For this reason, we have chosen to cross-reference our thesis documents here, and we encourage readers to view the performance of Negotiations in its entirety.
Thesis documents cross-referenced:
French Vanilla: An Exploration of Biracial Identity Through Narrative Performance, by Carly Bates
Bhairavi: A Performance-Investigation of Belonging and Dis-Belonging in Diaspora Communities, by Raji Ganesan
Deep roots, shared fruits: Emergent creative process and the ecology of solo performance through “Dress in Something Plain and Dark,” by Allyson Yoder

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

134701-Thumbnail Image.png

Mazes of Waverly Place: Interactive Algorithmic Art Generator

Description

This paper is a supplement to our interactive algorithmic art generator project which can be found at weiverlyroe.github.io/waverlyplace. For this thesis, we demonstrate how with certain input we can algorithmically

This paper is a supplement to our interactive algorithmic art generator project which can be found at weiverlyroe.github.io/waverlyplace. For this thesis, we demonstrate how with certain input we can algorithmically generate art, specifically a playable random maze with exactly one solution. We explore interactive and algorithmic art and how our mazes are a form of both. Through examining several maze generation algorithms, we show that an ideal representation of a single-solution maze, called a perfect maze, is a spanning tree of a planar graph. The final algorithm is a re-imagining of Kruskal's Minimum Spanning Tree Algorithm with these adjustments: (1) potential edges are ordered randomly rather than sorted and (2) certain edges are forced in the maze in order for the wall structure to display the player's text input. Lastly, we discuss improvements which could be made and features which we plan to add to the project in the future.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

The Character of Counterculture

Description

Although frequently undetected or ignored, counterculture groups commonly face misrepresentation in popular media and, in turn, society. These subcultures are often depicted as undesirable or dangerous, creating a negative stereotype

Although frequently undetected or ignored, counterculture groups commonly face misrepresentation in popular media and, in turn, society. These subcultures are often depicted as undesirable or dangerous, creating a negative stereotype that follows the individuals who choose to express themselves in the aesthetics and lifestyles of non-normative communities. This creative project celebrates the beauty and sense of rebellion that can be seen in counterculture groups, and provides viewers with a window for viewing them in a new perspective. Considering the vastness of this topic, this project approaches it from three different directions: a series of photographic staged portraits, a series of digitally illustrated character portraits, and a written analysis to begin a discussion around the types of misrepresentation of countercultures and the potential impacts of that phenomenon. The process of planning was difficult yet rewarding, as it was important to ensure that the work would not contribute to the cycle of misinformation, but rather bring visibility to countercultures in the formal art realm. The photographed body of work recreates the composition of famous genre paintings by Judith Leyster and Johannes Vermeer, but substitutes the subjects for a model dressed in the conventional aesthetic of a particular counterculture. There are four portraits in this series, depicting Punk, Goth, Metal, and Emo cultures, using costuming as well as clues in the surrounding environments. By adopting the genre practice of depicting scenes of everyday life, the counterculture communities become normalized for the viewer as people living similar lives to their own. This portion of the thesis is largely inspired by Cindy Sherman, a visual artist who stages portraits of herself as various characters to comment on ideals of beauty and the female form. Continuing to examine the idea of personality in counterculture, the digitally illustrated body of work pulls from four other countercultures to create portraits of fictional characters. Although imaginative, their designs reflect genuine aesthetics of the communities they represent, and are combined with photographic imagery to suggest their connection to real world peoples. The images represent Grunge, Glam-Rock, Non-Binary, and Scene cultures, with each character receiving a name, location, and occupation to challenge first impressions and demonstrate their roles in society. The characters are drawn in a cartoon-like style with the intent to design them as something one might see in popular media (such as in graphic novels). Lastly, these bodies of work are complemented by a brief analytical introduction into the issues of misrepresentation of countercultures in popular media. Intended to be a catalyst for future discussions, the piece discusses the importance of representation and the harmful effects of misinformation in media, and explores contemporary examples of such issues in depictions of Punk and Goth communities in television. In combination with the two series, this analysis will guide viewers as they proceed to interpret and internalize their own meaning from the project.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

151708-Thumbnail Image.png

Trickster dialogics: : a method for articulating cultural archetypes from 'Q' to performance art

Description

Simultaneously culture heroes and stumbling buffoons, Tricksters bring cultural tools to the people and make the world more habitable. There are common themes in these figures that remain fruitful for

Simultaneously culture heroes and stumbling buffoons, Tricksters bring cultural tools to the people and make the world more habitable. There are common themes in these figures that remain fruitful for the advancement of culture, theory, and critical praxis. This dissertation develops a method for opening a dialogue with Trickster figures. It draws from established literature to present a newly conceived and more flexible Trickster archetype. This archetype is more than a collection of traits; it builds on itself processually to form a method for analysis. The critical Trickster archetype includes the fundamental act of crossing borders; the twin ontologies of ambiguity and liminality; the particular tactics of humor, duplicity, and shape shifting; and the overarching cultural roles of culture hero and stumbling buffoon. Running parallel to each archetypal element, though, are Trickster's overarching critical spirit of Quixotic utopianism and underlying telos of manipulating human relationships. The character 'Q' from Star Trek: The Next Generation is used to demonstrate the critical Trickster archetype. To be more useful for critical cultural studies, Trickster figures must also be connected to their socio-cultural and historical contexts. Thus, this dissertation offers a second set of analytics, a dialogical method that connects Tricksters to the worlds they make more habitable. This dialogical method, developed from the work of M. M. Bakhtin and others, consists of three analytical tools: utterance, intertextuality, and chronotope. Utterance bounds the text for analysis. Intertextuality connects the utterance, the text, to its context. Chronotope suggests particular spatio-temporal relationships that help reveal the cultural significance of a dialogical performance. Performance artists Andre Stitt, Ann Liv Young, and Steven Leyba are used to demonstrate the method of Trickster dialogics. A concluding discussion of Trickster's unique chronotope reveals its contributions to conceptions of utopia and futurity. This dissertation offers theoretical advancements about the significance and tactics of subversive communication practices. It offers a new and unique method for cultural and performative analyses that can be expanded into different kinds of dialogics. Trickster dialogics can also be used generatively to direct and guide the further development of performative praxis.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

153795-Thumbnail Image.png

Waiting for a passenger / ship to go to sea

Description

Waiting for a Passenger / Ship to Go to Sea is a performance made by In Kyung Lee and performed by five dancers. It premiered in Americas Gallery at ASU

Waiting for a Passenger / Ship to Go to Sea is a performance made by In Kyung Lee and performed by five dancers. It premiered in Americas Gallery at ASU Art Museum on January 20, January 24, and Jan 27, 2015. The work existed in a container of geometric spatial structure and cyclical rhythmic cycles, which were filled with repetition, accumulation, and minimalistic durational movement vocabulary. The dancers courageously ventured through the rigorous and exacting structure, transforming individual and collective struggles and vulnerabilities into the beauty of being human. This document looks into the background and creation process of the work.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015