Matching Items (64)

132146-Thumbnail Image.png

Analyzing Hospital Environments Provided By Nurses: A Qualitative Study

Description

The purpose of this study is to explore ways nurses provide an optimal healing environment in the hospital setting. One aim of this research is to identify gaps between nurses’

The purpose of this study is to explore ways nurses provide an optimal healing environment in the hospital setting. One aim of this research is to identify gaps between nurses’ confidence in their ability to provide a healing environment and patient interpretation of the environment they received. Additionally, this paper looks for missing information in healing environment literature and pinpoints where hospital systems can be improved to help nurses and patients under their care. Data was collected through two online surveys created with Qualtrics Research Core™. One was taken by registered nurses who annotated how well they execute each domain of an Optimal Healing Environment (OHE) and what hinders their performance. The other survey was given to individuals who have been a patient in an Arizona hospital, and they commented on the environment they experienced. Total surveyed subjects include three nurses and four previously hospitalized patients. Data collected was not enough to make any conclusions so additional literature was reviewed and patterns between the literature and survey responses were analyzed. There is a consensus around what a healing environment should look like but there is no explanation as to who is responsible for creating one and what is the nurse’s role, if any. It was concluded that there needs to be more research on the practice of providing healing environments.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

130974-Thumbnail Image.png

A Review of Prevention, Early Recognition, and Directed Therapy of Sepsis

Description

Sepsis is a global health problem, and millions of people die annually from sepsis around the world (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2018). The purpose of this literature review

Sepsis is a global health problem, and millions of people die annually from sepsis around the world (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2018). The purpose of this literature review is to discuss the prevention, recognition, and treatment of sepsis as well as the need for more public health education to raise awareness of the significant burden of sepsis. It is difficult to recognize because there are several nonspecific symptoms, and there is not a comprehensive diagnostic tool. Diagnosis is based on evidence of infection, organ dysfunction, and clinical judgment (Fay et al., 2020). The definition of sepsis has evolved over the last three decades, though the most recent update is not widely accepted by all healthcare systems. There remains debate about treatment practices as well, including the following: whether one or multiple antibiotics should be used, which type of fluids should be used for rapid resuscitation, and the number of fluids that should be given to the patient. However, evidence agrees that treatment should be started within the first hour of symptom onset for the best chance of survival (Gyawali, Ramakrishna, & Dhamoon, 2019). Despite the significant burden that sepsis places on families, healthcare team members, and hospitals, there is not enough public awareness of the issue (Jabaley et al., 2018). There should be a greater push for public education using technology, social media, and mass media campaigns to increase awareness and prevention of infection.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

131051-Thumbnail Image.png

The Hospital Experience: Perception and Memories Across the Lifespan

Description

This work is a mixed-methods study performed to evaluate the variance in patients’ hospital experiences at different stages of life. A survey of patients’ personal experience was designed based on

This work is a mixed-methods study performed to evaluate the variance in patients’ hospital experiences at different stages of life. A survey of patients’ personal experience was designed based on information on healthcare practice from peer-reviewed journals and concepts from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 2020). This study examined differences in how patients perceive memories of the hospital at the time of admission to the perception of their memories in the present day. The strength of association between past perceptions of overall experience with various aspects of the hospital experience was analyzed by calculating eta. The percent of variance in perception of experience that is explained by each aspect of the experience was then calculated by eta squared. Results were separated by age group at the time of admission to determine factors most likely to affect each group’s experience. Age groups 10 years and younger and 11-14 years were both concerned with the atmosphere of the hospital. All groups complained about their quality of sleep and the quality of the food, however, a majority of the complaints came from age groups 15-17 years and 18-21 years. The four age groups from 22-35+ years did not have enough participants to draw age specific conclusions by themselves and were therefore combined into one group, 22+ years. The 22+ years age group complained the most about noise, they complained about day noise in addition to night noise.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

131052-Thumbnail Image.png

Nurses Aiding in Patients with Congenital Heart Disease Transition from the Pediatric to the Adult Healthcare Setting

Description

Advancing medical and surgical care has cause for there to be a rapidly growing population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Now that pediatric patients with CHD are living

Advancing medical and surgical care has cause for there to be a rapidly growing population of adults with congenital heart disease (CHD). Now that pediatric patients with CHD are living into adulthood there is a problem with the lack of transitional care these patients receive. The lack of transitional care has led to many issues that adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patients face such as a lack of autonomy and knowledge, which contributes to an increased chance for a lapse in their care. Lapses in care lead to greater risks of heart failure, arrhythmias, morbidity, and premature death. Research revealed that there is a gap in the transitional care process for patients with CHD from the pediatric to adult healthcare setting that needs to be addressed. Nurses can aid in this process by establishing habits of independence as well as teaching CHD patients about their condition and its care requirements at a younger age. This creative project aims to educate nurses working in the pediatric cardiovascular acute care setting on ways they can aid in the transition process of patients with CHD as they grow out of the pediatric care setting and into the adult care setting in order to establish continuity of care.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

Portrayal of Clients with Eating Disorders by Gender, Weight, and Diagnosis in Foundational Psychiatric Nursing Textbooks from 2017 to Present

Description

PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to examine recent nursing textbooks’ portrayal of gender, weight, and diagnosis in eating disorder exemplars, and compare the textbook presentation to prevalence rates

PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to examine recent nursing textbooks’ portrayal of gender, weight, and diagnosis in eating disorder exemplars, and compare the textbook presentation to prevalence rates as published within the textbooks themselves.

CONTEXT: Eating disorders are often portrayed as afflicting underweight women with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa. Demographics of people outside this stereotype face health disparities in illness recognition and treatment. Passive exposure to information on eating disorders can reduce stereotypical beliefs among nursing students, which has the potential to improve patient care.

METHOD: Case studies, practice questions, vignettes, and care plans from eight psychiatric nursing textbooks were analyzed for portrayal of the three research variables.

DATA and RESULTS: Men were not significantly underrepresented in the exemplars. Transgender clients, clients of normal or overweight status, and clients with diagnoses other than anorexia nervosa were significantly underrepresented from eating disorder exemplars.

CONCLUSION: Textbooks should be adjusted to include more exemplars from underrepresented demographics of clients with eating disorders.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

131081-Thumbnail Image.png

Discussing the Efficacy and Providing Recommendations For A Gardening Initiative in A US-Mexico Border Community

Description

Diabetes mellitus impacts nations across the globe, and the incidence is increasing at an alarming rate, especially among low and middle income countries (World Health Organization, 2020). Mexico faces specific

Diabetes mellitus impacts nations across the globe, and the incidence is increasing at an alarming rate, especially among low and middle income countries (World Health Organization, 2020). Mexico faces specific challenges in the diabetes epidemic that creates a disproportionate increase in premature mortality as well as healthcare costs (Arredondo & Reyes, 2013). The rural residents of Naco, Mexico face additional barriers related to healthcare access and education; these barriers elevate the importance of diabetes management and prevention strategies (Valenzuela et al., 2003). This paper will evaluate community-based diabetes interventions relevant to the Mexican community and identify characteristics of successful interventions. The health impact, role, structure, and development of community gardens in Naco will be evaluated using multiple community-based frameworks followed by clear translatable recommendations for stakeholders.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

131649-Thumbnail Image.png

Binge Drinking Behaviors among College Fraternity Members: An Exploration Using Theory of Planned Behavior

Description

Research indicates members of college Fraternities binge drinking at higher rates than their peers. Given the health and social consequences of binge drinking, it may be beneficial to explore binge

Research indicates members of college Fraternities binge drinking at higher rates than their peers. Given the health and social consequences of binge drinking, it may be beneficial to explore binge drinking behaviors in this specific population. This study examined if the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) predicts binge drinking behaviors of Fraternity students at Arizona State University. In a cross-sectional design, male Fraternity members (n=49) completed an online survey measuring their drinking behaviors and associated constructs of the Theory of Planned Behavior (i.e. attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms, behavioral control, and self-efficacy). Results indicated all participants reported drinking alcohol over the previous 30 days. TPB variables of attitudes (r =.658, p <0.01), subjective norms (r =.384, p <0.01), and self-efficacy (r =.487, p <.01) were significantly associated with the construct of intention to binge drink. Variables of descriptive norms (r=-.045, p>.05) and perceived control (r=-.060, p>.05) were not significantly associated with intention to binge drink. Binge drinking intention (r =.538, p <0.01) was also significantly associated with binge drinking behaviors in this population. Findings indicate favorably for TPB to describe binge drinking behaviors in University Fraternity students. Researchers designing interventions to prevent binge drinking may consider targeting TPB constructs attitudes, subjective norms, and self-efficacy, as the current study indicates these are important factors associated with intention to binge drink, as well as actual binge drinking behaviors.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

131673-Thumbnail Image.png

Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis Experience in Individuals Aged 15 to 24 Years

Description

The purpose of the integrative review was to analyze published research on the experiences of individuals aged 15 to 24 years within two years of a type 1 diabetes mellitus

The purpose of the integrative review was to analyze published research on the experiences of individuals aged 15 to 24 years within two years of a type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) diagnosis, with the intention of understanding their potential challenges and ensuring best practice by healthcare professionals when caring for and supporting these individuals. With T1DM being a chronic disease with no known cure, this diagnosis greatly impacts one’s life, making understanding of the experiences of individuals with diabetes essential. Individuals aged 15 to 24 years were studied as this age group craves autonomy while potentially facing multiple life transitions simultaneously. They may make risky decisions that can threaten their health, and are at an increased risk for suicide. After completing a systematic literature search, two studies that met the set criteria were analyzed. One found that T1DM adds challenges to college living, while the other study discussed management of exercise with T1DM. Both studies emphasized the importance of education and how T1DM affects all parts of one’s life. While they provided a glimpse of the daily challenges individuals with T1DM face, there are still many gaps in T1DM diagnosis experience research. Health professionals need additional credible research in order to conduct evidence-based practice that improves the lives of these young individuals coping with a serious chronic disease. If further research is not conducted, individuals aged 15 to 24 years are at a severe disadvantage in navigating a new T1DM diagnosis and could easily become overwhelmed due to their developing brains and additional lifestyle changes that come with being an emerging adult.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

131599-Thumbnail Image.png

Perspectives of Adolescents Receiving Psychiatric Treatment in Relation to Treatment Adherence: A Meta-synthesis

Description

A meta-synthesis consisting of 10 research studies exploring the perspectives of adolescents receiving psychiatric treatment in relation to treatment adherence was conducted. Current literature indicates several factors contributing to partial

A meta-synthesis consisting of 10 research studies exploring the perspectives of adolescents receiving psychiatric treatment in relation to treatment adherence was conducted. Current literature indicates several factors contributing to partial or non-adherence to pharmacologic or non-pharmacologic treatment, as well as a need for further research to be conducted. Adolescents are a particularly vulnerable population to mental health conditions. Often symptoms of mental health conditions are present during childhood and adolescence, though they are not addressed until adulthood. Early intervention and prevention of the worsening of symptoms increases the likelihood of positive health outcomes. It is imperative that nursing staff understand the experience of this population in order to provide patient-centered care. Literature was thoroughly searched using the terms 'qualitative', 'adolescents', 'adherence', and 'psychiatric'. The following databases were used during the literature search: PubMed, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. Noblit and Hare’s 1988 comparative method of synthesizing qualitative studies guided the inquiry. Collectively, the 10 studies yielded a sample size of 415 participants. Overarching themes were generated to reflect the patient experience of adolescents receiving mental health care services. The themes identified were autonomy, ostrification, therapeutic intervention, and identity. The theme of autonomy related to the adolescents’ desire to control their care and treatment plan. In regards to ostrification, several adolescents reported feeling isolated during treatment. Therapeutic intervention related to the variety of factors that influenced an adolescent’s commitment to pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment. Identity referred to adolescents’ struggle with self-concept after being diagnosed with a mental health condition. It is noted that variation was present throughout the studies identified to meet inclusionary criteria, and these variations were expressed within the findings.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

131603-Thumbnail Image.png

Linguistic Content of Stories Told by Caregivers of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients

Description

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a treatment for hematologic malignancies. The procedure poses multiple medical risks ranging from infection to graft-versus-host disease. Patients must designate a full-time informal caregiver, typically

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a treatment for hematologic malignancies. The procedure poses multiple medical risks ranging from infection to graft-versus-host disease. Patients must designate a full-time informal caregiver, typically a family member. Caregivers assume multiple medical and logistical responsibilities. Distress and burden are common. Psychosocial interventions, including narrative-based interventions, may offer support for caregivers. This thesis makes use of data collected as part of a digital storytelling intervention for HCT caregivers. Participants were 6 caregivers of HCT survivors who participated in a 3-day digital storytelling workshop, culminating in the creation of a personal story about their experience as a caregiver in the form of a video with narration in their own voice. Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC, 2015) was used to characterize content of the stories. Compared to norms (base rates of word usage provided by the LIWC developers), caregivers used more first-person plural pronouns. Such use of we-talk may indicate caregiver-patient dyadic strength given other research linking we-talk to communal coping. Counter to prediction, caregivers did not differ from norms with respect to use of negative affect words or cognitive process words. They did, however, use more biological process words (to be expected given their focus on health) and more words indicative of affiliation (understandable in light of their interpersonal connection to the patient and supportive care role). Further research is needed to examine potential change in linguistic content across the HCT trajectory (from pre-transplant through long-term survivorship), also to compare caregiver and patient stories.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05