Matching Items (3)

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A Simple Platform for the Rapid Development of Antimicrobials

Description

Recent infectious outbreaks highlight the need for platform technologies that can be quickly deployed to develop therapeutics needed to contain the outbreak. We present a simple concept for rapid development

Recent infectious outbreaks highlight the need for platform technologies that can be quickly deployed to develop therapeutics needed to contain the outbreak. We present a simple concept for rapid development of new antimicrobials. The goal was to produce in as little as one week thousands of doses of an intervention for a new pathogen. We tested the feasibility of a system based on antimicrobial synbodies. The system involves creating an array of 100 peptides that have been selected for broad capability to bind and/or kill viruses and bacteria. The peptides are pre-screened for low cell toxicity prior to large scale synthesis. Any pathogen is then assayed on the chip to find peptides that bind or kill it. Peptides are combined in pairs as synbodies and further screened for activity and toxicity. The lead synbody can be quickly produced in large scale, with completion of the entire process in one week.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-12-14

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A Technology for Developing Synbodies with Antibacterial Activity

Description

The rise in antibiotic resistance has led to an increased research focus on discovery of new antibacterial candidates. While broad-spectrum antibiotics are widely pursued, there is evidence that resistance arises

The rise in antibiotic resistance has led to an increased research focus on discovery of new antibacterial candidates. While broad-spectrum antibiotics are widely pursued, there is evidence that resistance arises in part from the wide spread use of these antibiotics. Our group has developed a system to produce protein affinity agents, called synbodies, which have high affinity and specificity for their target. In this report, we describe the adaptation of this system to produce new antibacterial candidates towards a target bacterium. The system functions by screening target bacteria against an array of 10,000 random sequence peptides and, using a combination of membrane labeling and intracellular dyes, we identified peptides with target specific binding or killing functions. Binding and lytic peptides were identified in this manner and in vitro tests confirmed the activity of the lead peptides. A peptide with antibacterial activity was linked to a peptide specifically binding Staphylococcus aureus to create a synbody with increased antibacterial activity. Subsequent tests showed that this peptide could block S. aureus induced killing of HEK293 cells in a co-culture experiment. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using the synbody system to discover new antibacterial candidate agents.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-01-23

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Plasma Exosome Profiling of Cancer Patients by a Next Generation Systems Biology Approach

Description

Technologies capable of characterizing the full breadth of cellular systems need to be able to measure millions of proteins, isoforms, and complexes simultaneously. We describe an approach that fulfils this

Technologies capable of characterizing the full breadth of cellular systems need to be able to measure millions of proteins, isoforms, and complexes simultaneously. We describe an approach that fulfils this criterion: Adaptive Dynamic Artificial Poly-ligand Targeting (ADAPT). ADAPT employs an enriched library of single-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides (ssODNs) to profile complex biological samples, thus achieving an unprecedented coverage of system-wide, native biomolecules. We used ADAPT as a highly specific profiling tool that distinguishes women with or without breast cancer based on circulating exosomes in their blood. To develop ADAPT, we enriched a library of ~10[superscript 11] ssODNs for those associating with exosomes from breast cancer patients or controls. The resulting 10[superscript 6] enriched ssODNs were then profiled against plasma from independent groups of healthy and breast cancer-positive women. ssODN-mediated affinity purification and mass spectrometry identified low-abundance exosome-associated proteins and protein complexes, some with known significance in both normal homeostasis and disease. Sequencing of the recovered ssODNs provided quantitative measures that were used to build highly accurate multi-analyte signatures for patient classification. Probing plasma from 500 subjects with a smaller subset of 2000 resynthesized ssODNs stratified healthy, breast biopsy-negative, and -positive women. An AUC of 0.73 was obtained when comparing healthy donors with biopsy-positive patients.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-02-20