Matching Items (143)

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Music in the Classroom: A Look at Melodies and Phonics Retention

Description

The study compares the pretest and posttest results of three groups of second-grade students studying a phonics rule to determine the effect of using music as an instructional aid. For

The study compares the pretest and posttest results of three groups of second-grade students studying a phonics rule to determine the effect of using music as an instructional aid. For two groups in the study, the teachers used melodies to instruct students, while the third group was held to direct instruction with no music to use for assistance. The study groups were three second-grade classes at Ishikawa Elementary School, where I was serving as a student teacher. Parental consent was received for each of the students participating in the study. The duration of the study was one week. The first test group was given a familiar melody with new lyrics to reflect the content of the phonics rule "I before E except after C." The second test group was given a melody composed specifically to accompany the phonics rule and to reflect the appropriate phonics content. On the first day of the study, students were given a pretest; these scores were recorded and then compared to the posttest scores from the end of the week. The data that were collected compared groups as a whole through composite scores from pretest to posttest to determine most effective methodology. The groups that were instructed using music demonstrated greater growth and had higher posttest scores.

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  • 2014-12

It Takes a Village: An Inquiry into the Importance of Community in Educational Success

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This research looks at a group of students from Tumaini Children's Home in Nyeri, Kenya. The purpose of this paper is to explore why this particular group of students is

This research looks at a group of students from Tumaini Children's Home in Nyeri, Kenya. The purpose of this paper is to explore why this particular group of students is so academically successful. Quantitative research was taken from the average 2013 test scores of Tumaini students who took the Kenyan Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) exam in comparison to the scores of students who are not residing in the orphanage. Qualitative research involves interviews from those students who live in Tumaini and interviews from adults who are closely connected to the orphanage. The purpose is to understand why the students are performing so well academically and what support they have created for themselves that allows them to do so.

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  • 2014-12

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E-books and Emergent Literacy in Early Childhood Education: The Impact of Dialogic Reading on Vocabulary Knowledge and Story Retell

Description

The incorporation of electronic books (e-books) into the classroom and home of young children has been shown to have positive effects on the acquisition of early literacy skills. Dialogic reading

The incorporation of electronic books (e-books) into the classroom and home of young children has been shown to have positive effects on the acquisition of early literacy skills. Dialogic reading methods, which include interactive conversations between caregiver and child about a story as it is being read, additionally are known to improve skills that lead to improved literacy during the school years. No research to date, however, has examined e-books and dialogic reading when used together. This study examines how using dialogic reading with a child reading an e-book will impact the acquisition of emergent literacy skills, particularly vocabulary knowledge and story recall ability. Twenty-three children aged 3 to 5 took part in a matched pairs experiment that included reading a select e-book four times in which half received a dialogic reading intervention. The children who received the intervention scored significantly higher in the story recall measure of the posttest than those in the control group. No differences were found between the experimental and control groups on the vocabulary measure, although mutual gains were found among both groups from the pretest to the posttest. The results suggest that dialogic reading when incorporated with e-books may improve a child's ability to recall a story. Further, the results indicate that repeated reading of the same e-book may increase vocabulary knowledge.

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  • 2014-12

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Impact of Visual Stimuli on Intergroup Perceptions

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a music video that modeled intergroup interaction on reducing bias towards outgroup members. 40 undergraduate students from Arizona State

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a music video that modeled intergroup interaction on reducing bias towards outgroup members. 40 undergraduate students from Arizona State University were part of this study. Participants completed the PANAS (Positive And Negative Affect Schedule); measures of openness; a distraction cognitive task; attribution scenarios that asked for trait ratings, reason ratings, and point allocation for reasons; and the IAT (Implicit Association Test). Results indicated no significant increase in positive affect, increase in openness, or reduction of the ultimate attribution error. However, a significant effect emerged for the interaction between watch and listen for negative affect and the watch only group for the IAT. Participants who both watched and listened to the video showed a decrease in negative affect scores. Participants who only watched the video demonstrated an increased automatic preference towards European Americans (an automatic preference toward European Americans is typical). The results indicated desirable outcomes of reduced negative affect, showing the potential for music videos showing intergroup contact and recategorization in influencing affect.

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  • 2014-05

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Research into Phoenix-area School Districts' Supports and Incentives for graduation and higher education with regard to students in the foster care system

Description

This paper is written to describe the results of an undergraduate thesis project which grew from an interest in the various supports teenagers in the foster care system can obtain

This paper is written to describe the results of an undergraduate thesis project which grew from an interest in the various supports teenagers in the foster care system can obtain the city of Phoenix, Arizona. Since graduation rates are quite low for this demographic on a national level, there is a need to research what incentives and supports various high school districts in different cities and towns within Phoenix offer students within the foster care system in order to promote graduation and potentially the pursuit of higher education. Literary texts were analyzed and district and high school officials from around the Phoenix-area were interviewed. Information gathered from these correspondences was followed by contacting local colleges in order to see what those institutions provide in terms of scholarships and housing, since after age 18 these teenagers are no longer considered wards of the state and therefore "age out" of the system. The results of this endeavor are written on the following pages.

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  • 2013-12

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Accelerated Reader: The Good, the Bad, and the Future of the Program

Description

The Accelerated Reader Program has been a widely used reading program in elementary schools in the United States. However, even with its popularity, there have been controversies on if and

The Accelerated Reader Program has been a widely used reading program in elementary schools in the United States. However, even with its popularity, there have been controversies on if and how it should be used in the classroom. Arguments in support say the program gets children to read and that it is a helpful tool for teachers to keep track of each students reading abilities. Arguments against suggest that book choice is decreased, book levels are askew, the quizzes do not promote higher level thinking, and the use of incentives may send the wrong signals to students. Schools have started to abandon the program in the recent years, but maybe it will come back bigger and stronger. In the meantime, schools need to make sure that enriching books fill the schools and classrooms to promote reading for their students.

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  • 2013-12

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Goal-Setting in the Elementary Education Classroom: A Component of Self-Regulated Learning

Description

The present study was conducted in order to investigate the implementation of the self-regulated learning component of goal-setting in the elementary education classroom. Essential questions posed addressed the reasoning behind

The present study was conducted in order to investigate the implementation of the self-regulated learning component of goal-setting in the elementary education classroom. Essential questions posed addressed the reasoning behind why classrooms may not implement goal-setting despite the proven benefits. Also studied was the application of goal-setting within the classroom and what that may look like for educators. Finally, student preferences were observed and taken into consideration during implementation in order to help the study benefit them as much as possible. Participants included 29 fourth grade students at Rover Elementary School. The study was conducted over a six-week period by a student teacher that was completing their Senior Residency in this particular classroom. During study implementation, students were introduced to the concept of goal-setting. Using a series of goal-setting documents, students practiced goal-setting in, first, a Reader's Workshop period then, secondly, in a Writing Block. It was concluded that goal-setting may not be implemented in the classroom due to the amount of time necessary to complete the practice as well as the possibility that educators may not have the knowledge needed to properly make use of the practice. The application of the practice brings to light the need for students to include the setting of process goals in addition to product goals. Through the use of an exit survey, student preferences revealed that initially, they would rather have pre-written process goals to aim towards achieving rather than having to develop their own. In the future, it is suggested to conduct this study over a longer period of time in order to evaluate if students can develop their own goal-setting strategies.

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  • 2014-05

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Rolling Down Ramps: A Unit Plan to Address the Urgent Need of STEM Instruction in Preschool

Description

STEM education stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and is necessary for students to keep up with global competition in the changing job market, technological advancements and challenges of

STEM education stands for science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and is necessary for students to keep up with global competition in the changing job market, technological advancements and challenges of the future. However, American students are lacking STEM achievement at the state, national and global levels. To combat this lack of achievement I propose that STEM instruction should begin in preschool, be integrated into the curriculum and be inquiry based. To support this proposal I created a month-long physics unit for preschoolers in a Head Start classroom. Students investigated the affect of incline, friction and weight on the distance of a rolling object, while developing their pre-math, pre-literacy and social emotional skills.

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  • 2015-05

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Exploration of Medieval Europe through Interactive Fiction

Description

Interaction is key to education, as students who perform their own inquiry into a subject retain information longer. The field of interactive fiction, which emphasizes personal decision making and freedom

Interaction is key to education, as students who perform their own inquiry into a subject retain information longer. The field of interactive fiction, which emphasizes personal decision making and freedom of choice, is ripe for opportunity as it is relatively simple to develop and deploy to audiences of any size. However, few interactive fiction platforms exist with the openness and flexibility required for classroom use. My project attempted to create an interactive fiction platform that can be created for and engaged with by both teachers and students. This led to the creation of an interactive fiction platform that conforms to a variety of requirements, such as openness and compatibility across multiple platforms, and which can display meaningful content. This was accomplished by someone with a content area education background and only limited computer science experience, and shows promise for similar future endeavors.

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  • 2014-12

"Mom, I'm DOOMED!" Literacy Development Through Theatrical Participation

Description

This project began when I heard a story that made my mind turn. The story was about a five- year-old girl who left her glove in the car on a

This project began when I heard a story that made my mind turn. The story was about a five- year-old girl who left her glove in the car on a chilly morning before school. Upon reaching the school entrance, she turned to her mother and cried, "Oh no! Mom! I'm Doomed!!" because she neglected to put on one of her gloves (Snow, 2012). Her mother, astonished by her daughter's mature answer, asked her daughter where she had heard that word before. The daughter explained that The Marley brothers told Scrooge this in the production of "A Christmas Carol" that she was participating in at the time. After hearing this story, I began to ponder the impact scripts and theatrical participation could have on a child's literacy skills, especially a child's vocabulary. Being involved in theatre since a very young age, I decided it was time to put her theory into a research project. "Mom, I'm DOOMED!" Literacy Development Through Theatrical Participation sets out to answer three main research questions: (1) How does theatrical participation benefit students' literacy skills? (2) How do scripts enhance students' vocabulary? (3) How do scripts and theatrical participation heighten students' fluency skills? In order to explore these research questions, the researcher created a theatrical workshop to engage students in an authentic theatrical experience. Using a fourth grade reader's theatre script and on-grade-level vocabulary words, I created a six-day workshop to engage students and gather data surrounding her research questions. After the workshop was conducted and data gathered, the results were analyzed for common trends and correlations. Although the results found were minimal, they did show a positive correlation between theatrical participation and students' literacy skills. Although students' data did show improvement in scores, there were no clear findings that could prove theatrical participation is a more effective learning environment than others.

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  • 2013-05