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Strain Induced Fragility Transition in Metallic Glass

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Relaxation dynamics are the central topic in glassy physics. Recently, there is an emerging view that mechanical strain plays a similar role as temperature in altering the relaxation dynamics. Here, we report that mechanical strain in a model metallic glass

Relaxation dynamics are the central topic in glassy physics. Recently, there is an emerging view that mechanical strain plays a similar role as temperature in altering the relaxation dynamics. Here, we report that mechanical strain in a model metallic glass modulates the relaxation dynamics in unexpected ways. We find that a large strain amplitude makes a fragile liquid become stronger, reduces dynamical heterogeneity at the glass transition and broadens the loss spectra asymmetrically, in addition to speeding up the relaxation dynamics. These findings demonstrate the distinctive roles of strain compared with temperature on the relaxation dynamics and indicate that dynamical heterogeneity inherently relates to the fragility of glass-forming materials.

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Date Created
2015-05-18

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High Quality Transparent TiO2/Ag/TiO2 Composite Electrode Films Deposited on Flexible Substrate at Room Temperature by Sputtering

Description

Multilayer structures of TiO2/Ag/TiO2 have been deposited onto flexible substrates by room temperature sputtering to develop indium-free transparent composite electrodes. The effect of Ag thicknesses on optical and electrical properties and the mechanism of conduction have been discussed. The critical

Multilayer structures of TiO2/Ag/TiO2 have been deposited onto flexible substrates by room temperature sputtering to develop indium-free transparent composite electrodes. The effect of Ag thicknesses on optical and electrical properties and the mechanism of conduction have been discussed. The critical thickness (tc) of Ag mid-layer to form a continuous conducting layer is 9.5 nm and the multilayer has been optimized to obtain a sheet resistance of 5.7 Ω/sq and an average optical transmittance of 90% at 590 nm. The Haacke figure of merit (FOM) for tc has one of the highest FOMs with 61.4 × 10-3 Ω-1/sq.

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Date Created
2013-06-07

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A Hinge Migration Mechanism Unlocks the Evolution of Green-to-Red Photoconversion in GFP-Like Proteins

Description

In proteins, functional divergence involves mutations that modify structure and dynamics. Here we provide experimental evidence for an evolutionary mechanism driven solely by long-range dynamic motions without significant backbone adjustments, catalytic group rearrangements, or changes in subunit assembly. Crystallographic structures

In proteins, functional divergence involves mutations that modify structure and dynamics. Here we provide experimental evidence for an evolutionary mechanism driven solely by long-range dynamic motions without significant backbone adjustments, catalytic group rearrangements, or changes in subunit assembly. Crystallographic structures were determined for several reconstructed ancestral proteins belonging to a GFP class frequently employed in superresolution microscopy. Their chain flexibility was analyzed using molecular dynamics and perturbation response scanning. The green-to-red photoconvertible phenotype appears to have arisen from a common green ancestor by migration of a knob-like anchoring region away from the active site diagonally across the β barrel fold. The allosterically coupled mutational sites provide active site conformational mobility via epistasis. We propose that light-induced chromophore twisting is enhanced in a reverse-protonated subpopulation, activating internal acid-base chemistry and backbone cleavage to enlarge the chromophore. Dynamics-driven hinge migration may represent a more general platform for the evolution of novel enzyme activities.

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2015-01-06

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Preparation and Hydrosilylation Activity of a Molybdenum Carbonyl Complex That Features a Pentadentate Bis(imino)pyridine Ligand

Description

Attempts to prepare low-valent molybdenum complexes that feature a pentadentate 2,6-bis(imino)pyridine (or pyridine diimine, PDI) chelate allowed for the isolation of two different products. Refluxing Mo(CO)6 with the pyridine-substituted PDI ligand, PyEtPDI, resulted in carbonyl ligand substitution and formation of

Attempts to prepare low-valent molybdenum complexes that feature a pentadentate 2,6-bis(imino)pyridine (or pyridine diimine, PDI) chelate allowed for the isolation of two different products. Refluxing Mo(CO)6 with the pyridine-substituted PDI ligand, PyEtPDI, resulted in carbonyl ligand substitution and formation of the respective bis(ligand) compound (PyEtPDI)2Mo (1). This complex was investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations indicated that 1 possesses a Mo(0) center that back-bonds into the π*-orbitals of the unreduced PDI ligands. Heating an equimolar solution of Mo(CO)[subscript 6] and the phosphine-substituted PDI ligand, Ph2PPrPDI, to 120 °C allowed for the preparation of (Ph2PPrPDI)Mo(CO) (2), which is supported by a κ5-N,N,N,P,P-Ph2PPrPDI chelate. Notably, 1 and 2 have been found to catalyze the hydrosilylation of benzaldehyde at 90 °C, and the optimization of 2-catalyzed aldehyde hydrosilylation at this temperature afforded turnover frequencies of up to 330 h–1. Considering additional experimental observations, the potential mechanism of 2-mediated carbonyl hydrosilylation is discussed.

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Date Created
2014-09-01

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Prevalent and Distinct Spliceosomal 3 '-end Processing Mechanisms for Fungal Telomerase RNA

Description

Telomerase RNA (TER) is an essential component of the telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex. The mechanism for TER 3′-end processing is highly divergent among different organisms. Here we report a unique spliceosome-mediated TER 3′-end cleavage mechanism in Neurospora crassa that is distinct

Telomerase RNA (TER) is an essential component of the telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex. The mechanism for TER 3′-end processing is highly divergent among different organisms. Here we report a unique spliceosome-mediated TER 3′-end cleavage mechanism in Neurospora crassa that is distinct from that found specifically in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. While the S. pombe TER intron contains the canonical 5′-splice site GUAUGU, the N. crassa TER intron contains a non-canonical 5′-splice site AUAAGU that alone prevents the second step of splicing and promotes spliceosomal cleavage. The unique N. crassa TER 5′-splice site sequence is evolutionarily conserved in TERs from Pezizomycotina and early branching Taphrinomycotina species. This suggests that the widespread and basal N. crassa-type spliceosomal cleavage mechanism is more ancestral than the S. pombe-type. The discovery of a prevalent, yet distinct, spliceosomal cleavage mechanism throughout diverse fungal clades furthers our understanding of TER evolution and non-coding RNA processing.

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Date Created
2015-01-01

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Ge1-ySny (y=0.01-0.10) Alloys on Ge-Buffered Si: Synthesis, Microstructure, and Optical Properties

Description

Novel hydride chemistries are employed to deposit light-emitting Ge1-y Snyalloys with y ≤ 0.1 by Ultra-High Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition (UHV-CVD) on Ge-buffered Si wafers. The properties of the resultant materials are systematically compared with similar alloys grown directly on Si wafers.

Novel hydride chemistries are employed to deposit light-emitting Ge1-y Snyalloys with y ≤ 0.1 by Ultra-High Vacuum Chemical Vapor Deposition (UHV-CVD) on Ge-buffered Si wafers. The properties of the resultant materials are systematically compared with similar alloys grown directly on Si wafers. The fundamental difference between the two systems is a fivefold (and higher) decrease in lattice mismatch between film and virtual substrate, allowing direct integration of bulk-like crystals with planar surfaces and relatively low dislocation densities. For y ≤ 0.06, the CVD precursors used were digermane Ge2H6 and deuterated stannane SnD4. For y ≥ 0.06, the Ge precursor was changed to trigermane Ge3H8, whose higher reactivity enabled the fabrication of supersaturated samples with the target film parameters. In all cases, the Ge wafers were produced using tetragermane Ge4H10 as the Ge source. The photoluminescence intensity from Ge1-y Sny /Ge films is expected to increase relative to Ge1-y Sny /Si due to the less defected interface with the virtual substrate. However, while Ge1-y Sny /Si films are largely relaxed, a significant amount of compressive strain may be present in the Ge1-y Sny /Ge case. This compressive strain can reduce the emission intensity by increasing the separation between the direct and indirect edges. In this context, it is shown here that the proposed CVD approach to Ge1-y Sny /Ge makes it possible to approach film thicknesses of about 1  μm, for which the strain is mostly relaxed and the photoluminescence intensity increases by one order of magnitude relative to Ge1-y Sny /Si films. The observed strain relaxation is shown to be consistent with predictions from strain-relaxation models first developed for the Si1-x Gex /Si system. The defect structure and atomic distributions in the films are studied in detail using advanced electron-microscopy techniques, including aberration corrected STEM imaging and EELS mapping of the average diamond–cubic lattice.

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Date Created
2014-10-07

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Comparing Well-Defined Manganese, Iron, Cobalt, and Nickel Ketone Hydrosilylation Catalysts

Description

A brief review of manganese-catalyzed hydrosilylation is presented along with a personal account of how the design for the highly active catalyst, (Ph2PPrPDI)Mn, was conceived. The reductive transformations achieved using this catalyst are described and put into further context by

A brief review of manganese-catalyzed hydrosilylation is presented along with a personal account of how the design for the highly active catalyst, (Ph2PPrPDI)Mn, was conceived. The reductive transformations achieved using this catalyst are described and put into further context by comparing the observed activities with those attained for leading late first-row transition-metal catalysts.

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Date Created
2014-07-01

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Elevated Plasma Albumin and Apolipoprotein A-I Oxidation Under Suboptimal Specimen Storage Conditions

Description

S-cysteinylated albumin and methionine-oxidized apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) have been posed as candidate markers of diseases associated with oxidative stress. Here, a dilute-and-shoot form of LC–electrospray ionization–MS requiring half a microliter of blood plasma was employed to simultaneously quantify the relative

S-cysteinylated albumin and methionine-oxidized apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) have been posed as candidate markers of diseases associated with oxidative stress. Here, a dilute-and-shoot form of LC–electrospray ionization–MS requiring half a microliter of blood plasma was employed to simultaneously quantify the relative abundance of these oxidized proteoforms in samples stored at −80 °C, −20 °C, and room temperature and exposed to multiple freeze-thaw cycles and other adverse conditions in order to assess the possibility that protein oxidation may occur as a result of poor sample storage or handling. Samples from a healthy donor and a participant with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes started at the same low level of protein oxidation and behaved similarly; significant increases in albumin oxidation via S-cysteinylation were found to occur within hours at room temperature and days at −20 °C. Methionine oxidation of apoA-I took place on a longer time scale, setting in after albumin oxidation reached a plateau. Freeze–thaw cycles had a minimal effect on protein oxidation. In matched collections, protein oxidation in serum was the same as that in plasma. Albumin and apoA-I oxidation were not affected by sample headspace or the degree to which vials were sealed. ApoA-I, however, was unexpectedly found to oxidize faster in samples with lower surface-area-to-volume ratios. An initial survey of samples from patients with inflammatory conditions normally associated with elevated oxidative stress-including acute myocardial infarction and prostate cancer—demonstrated a lack of detectable apoA-I oxidation. Albumin S-cysteinylation in these samples was consistent with known but relatively brief exposures to temperatures above −30 °C (the freezing point of blood plasma). Given their properties and ease of analysis, these oxidized proteoforms, once fully validated, may represent the first markers of blood plasma specimen integrity based on direct measurement of oxidative molecular damage that can occur under suboptimal storage conditions.

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Date Created
2014-07-01

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Improved Efficiency of P3HT: PCBM Solar Cells by Incorporation of Silver Oxide Interfacial Layer

Description

In recent years, a substantial amount of research has been focused on identifying suitable interfacial layers in organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells which has efficient charge transport properties. In this work, a very thin layer of AgOx is

In recent years, a substantial amount of research has been focused on identifying suitable interfacial layers in organic light-emitting diodes and organic solar cells which has efficient charge transport properties. In this work, a very thin layer of AgOx is deposited on top of the ITO layer along with PEDOT:PSS and is observed that the solar cells having the AgOx interfacial layer showed a 28% increase in power conversion efficiency in comparison to that of the control cell. The enhancement in efficiency has been ascribed to improvements in fill factor as well as the increase in shunt resistance and decrease in the series resistance of the solar cells. An equivalent circuit model is also provided to understand the changes in the series and shunt resistances in the AgOx modified devices.

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Date Created
2014-07-28

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Black Carbon Concentrations and Sources in the Marine Boundary Layer of the Tropical Atlantic Ocean Using Four Methodologies

Description

Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to

Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emission plume of biomass and agricultural burning products. Atmospheric particulate matter samples across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer were collected in the summer of 2010 during the southern hemispheric dry season when open fire events were frequent in Africa and South America. The highest black carbon concentrations were detected in the Caribbean Sea and within the African plume, with a regional average of 0.6 μg m-3 for both. The lowest average concentrations were measured off the coast of South America at 0.2 to 0.3 μg m-3. Samples were quantified for black carbon using multiple methods to provide insights into the form and stability of the carbonaceous aerosols (i.e., thermally unstable organic carbon, soot like, and charcoal like). Soot-like aerosols composed up to 45% of the carbonaceous aerosols in the Caribbean Sea to as little as 4% within the African plume. Charcoal-like aerosols composed up to 29% of the carbonaceous aerosols over the oligotrophic Sargasso Sea, suggesting that non-soot-like particles could be present in significant concentrations in remote environments. To better apportion concentrations and forms of black carbon, multiple detection methods should be used, particularly in regions impacted by biomass burning emissions.

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Date Created
2014-07-18