Matching Items (617)

Filtering by

Clear all filters

160983-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

The goal of the presented research is using Electro Field-assisted Nano Ink Writing(EF-NIW) to deposit poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate, or PEDOT, on a substrate to serve as a basis for designing high-efficiency, scalable solar cells. Through the analysis of parameters that affect electrospray deposition, methods to accurately produce a PEDOT film

The goal of the presented research is using Electro Field-assisted Nano Ink Writing(EF-NIW) to deposit poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate, or PEDOT, on a substrate to serve as a basis for designing high-efficiency, scalable solar cells. Through the analysis of parameters that affect electrospray deposition, methods to accurately produce a PEDOT film will be determined. With the finished, contingent film, tests for efficacy can be performed. The film will be analyzed for profilometry, determining the thickness of the film. The film will then be put up to a conductivity test.

ContributorsHutchins, John (Author) / Li, Xiangjia (Thesis director) / Zhu, Yizhen (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Program (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor)
Created2021-12
160987-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

This thesis examines the re-entry processes of individuals with mental health needs upon their release from prison. In order to uncover the resources that are provided to formerly incarcerated individuals with clinically diagnosed mental health issues, parole officers who have experience supervising individuals with mental health needs were interviewed. The

This thesis examines the re-entry processes of individuals with mental health needs upon their release from prison. In order to uncover the resources that are provided to formerly incarcerated individuals with clinically diagnosed mental health issues, parole officers who have experience supervising individuals with mental health needs were interviewed. The purpose of the interviews was to understand the experiences parole officers have regarding current supervision practices that are used, as well as programming and treatment opportunities parole officers know are available to this population of re-entrants. Being aware of the resources that are provided to formerly incarcerated individuals with mental health needs will help identify how to improve supervision, programming, and treatment so as to better support this population. As research and literature on the re-entry experiences of individuals with mental health care needs have demonstrated the extensive privations this population experiences, interviewing parole officers will reveal the roles parole officers, treatment providers, and programming have in supporting this population upon their release from prison. Moreover, interviewing parole officers will help identify how to improve parole outcomes for re-entrants with clinically diagnosed mental health issues.

ContributorsWalden, Hannah (Author) / Chamberlain, Alyssa (Thesis director) / Wright, Kevin (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor) / School of Criminology and Criminal Justice (Contributor)
Created2021-12
Description

Consumers have changed their purchasing preferences from only requiring a product or service be of quality and affordably priced to demanding the businesses that offer such products or services be socially responsible entities, as well. As corporate social responsibility endures to be regarded as a necessary business practice in the

Consumers have changed their purchasing preferences from only requiring a product or service be of quality and affordably priced to demanding the businesses that offer such products or services be socially responsible entities, as well. As corporate social responsibility endures to be regarded as a necessary business practice in the minds of consumers, brands must align their marketing strategies accordingly. Specifically, brands must use philanthropy as a selling point to attract consumers. Philanthropy serves the dual purpose of improving communities and, if done properly, creating a competitive context that businesses can use to their fiscal benefit. Cause marketing, in its simplest form, is the use of philanthropy by for-profit companies as a means of attracting clientele to increase sales. Through charitable involvement, for-profit companies can generate goodwill that in turn creates a positive public perception of their brand. By partnering with carefully selected charities and investing in charity-centric endeavors, companies can engage their customers and drive revenue while bettering their communities. From this standpoint, it behooves any business to engage in cause marketing initiatives as a means of attaining customers. This thesis articulates the value that cause marketing can add to a corporate portfolio, how community involvement can be parlayed into increased revenue, and why brands should invest in cause marketing tactics. A literature review was conducted, empirical information was collected and analyzed, and interview testimonials were used in defense of these claims. In conclusion, this thesis establishes statistical proof that cause marketing promotes sales by positively affecting consumer brand perception, a key factor in purchase consideration and purchasing decisions.

ContributorsShulman, Parker (Author) / Ostrom, Lonnie (Thesis director) / Schlacter, John (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor) / Department of Marketing (Contributor)
Created2021-12
162181-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

Consumers have changed their purchasing preferences from only requiring a product or service be of quality and affordably priced to demanding the businesses that offer such products or services be socially responsible entities, as well. As corporate social responsibility endures to be regarded as a necessary business practice in the

Consumers have changed their purchasing preferences from only requiring a product or service be of quality and affordably priced to demanding the businesses that offer such products or services be socially responsible entities, as well. As corporate social responsibility endures to be regarded as a necessary business practice in the minds of consumers, brands must align their marketing strategies accordingly. Specifically, brands must use philanthropy as a selling point to attract consumers. Philanthropy serves the dual purpose of improving communities and, if done properly, creating a competitive context that businesses can use to their fiscal benefit. Cause marketing, in its simplest form, is the use of philanthropy by for-profit companies as a means of attracting clientele to increase sales. Through charitable involvement, for-profit companies can generate goodwill that in turn creates a positive public perception of their brand. By partnering with carefully selected charities and investing in charity-centric endeavors, companies can engage their customers and drive revenue while bettering their communities. From this standpoint, it behooves any business to engage in cause marketing initiatives as a means of attaining customers. This thesis articulates the value that cause marketing can add to a corporate portfolio, how community involvement can be parlayed into increased revenue, and why brands should invest in cause marketing tactics. A literature review was conducted, empirical information was collected and analyzed, and interview testimonials were used in defense of these claims. In conclusion, this thesis establishes statistical proof that cause marketing promotes sales by positively affecting consumer brand perception, a key factor in purchase consideration and purchasing decisions.

ContributorsShulman, Parker (Author) / Ostrom, Lonnie (Thesis director) / Schlacter, John (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor)
Created2021-12
162182-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

Consumers have changed their purchasing preferences from only requiring a product or service be of quality and affordably priced to demanding the businesses that offer such products or services be socially responsible entities, as well. As corporate social responsibility endures to be regarded as a necessary business practice in the

Consumers have changed their purchasing preferences from only requiring a product or service be of quality and affordably priced to demanding the businesses that offer such products or services be socially responsible entities, as well. As corporate social responsibility endures to be regarded as a necessary business practice in the minds of consumers, brands must align their marketing strategies accordingly. Specifically, brands must use philanthropy as a selling point to attract consumers. Philanthropy serves the dual purpose of improving communities and, if done properly, creating a competitive context that businesses can use to their fiscal benefit. Cause marketing, in its simplest form, is the use of philanthropy by for-profit companies as a means of attracting clientele to increase sales. Through charitable involvement, for-profit companies can generate goodwill that in turn creates a positive public perception of their brand. By partnering with carefully selected charities and investing in charity-centric endeavors, companies can engage their customers and drive revenue while bettering their communities. From this standpoint, it behooves any business to engage in cause marketing initiatives as a means of attaining customers. This thesis articulates the value that cause marketing can add to a corporate portfolio, how community involvement can be parlayed into increased revenue, and why brands should invest in cause marketing tactics. A literature review was conducted, empirical information was collected and analyzed, and interview testimonials were used in defense of these claims. In conclusion, this thesis establishes statistical proof that cause marketing promotes sales by positively affecting consumer brand perception, a key factor in purchase consideration and purchasing decisions.

ContributorsShulman, Parker (Author) / Ostrom, Lonnie (Thesis director) / Schlacter, John (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor)
Created2021-12
162184-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

Hyper-arousal theory presumes that experiencing trauma can increase one’s sense of fight or flight responses or generalized sense of arousability (Riemann et al., 2010). While this theory has been examined in studies regarding insomnia (e.g. Schwandt et al., 2013) it has yet to be examine with dysregulated drinking outcomes such

Hyper-arousal theory presumes that experiencing trauma can increase one’s sense of fight or flight responses or generalized sense of arousability (Riemann et al., 2010). While this theory has been examined in studies regarding insomnia (e.g. Schwandt et al., 2013) it has yet to be examine with dysregulated drinking outcomes such as impaired control over alcohol use. Impaired control over alcohol use (IC) reflects drinking beyond one’s own self-proscribed limits for one’s own drinking behaviors (Heather et al., 1993). According to multiple review papers on the topic (Leeman et al., 2012; 2014), IC is an understudied topic regarding alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Thus, we sought to explore a pathway from facets of childhood trauma (emotional, physical, & sexual abuse, & neglect) versus a supportive family to arousability to drinking outcomes (i.e. IC, alcohol use, & alcohol-related problems). Method: We fit a multiple-group structural equation model with 835 (368 women/ 467 men) university student volunteers. As our model failed the overall invariance test, χ2Δ (20 df) = 55.788, p < .001, we allowed our hypothesized model to moderate on sex. Results: The direct link from sexual abuse to both IC and alcohol-related-problems was stronger for men than women. Emotional abuse was directly linked to higher levels of arousability among women, whereas an emotionally supportive family was related to lesser degrees of arousability among men. Impaired control mediated the indirect link between higher levels of arousability and alcohol use for both sexes. Impaired control also mediated the indirect link between physical neglect and alcohol-related problems among both sexes. Higher levels of emotional abuse were indirectly linked to both more alcohol use & problems through increased arousability and in turn, more IC among women. Higher levels of sexual abuse were indirectly linked to more alcohol problems through higher degrees of impaired control among men. Conclusions: We found evidence in favor of the Hyper-arousability Theory regarding dysregulated drinking with a direct link between arousability and IC. While physical neglect appears to affect both sexes drinking behaviors, emotional abuse may play a stronger role for women than men, while sexual abuse may play a stronger role among men.

ContributorsOng, Annie (Author) / Patock-Peckham, Julie (Thesis director) / Infurna, Frank (Committee member) / McClure, Samuel (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor) / Department of Psychology (Contributor)
Created2021-12
163424-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

In this project I created a series of infographics as comprehensive resources for students to reference as educational guides. As a business law student I have been able to accumulate knowledge through all of my law courses to better understand our society and its laws, albeit this knowledge is not

In this project I created a series of infographics as comprehensive resources for students to reference as educational guides. As a business law student I have been able to accumulate knowledge through all of my law courses to better understand our society and its laws, albeit this knowledge is not yet complete. Other students are not always given this same opportunity to understand their rights and the laws that govern them and have clearly indicated to me through my survey that they would feel better prepared to become young adults in society if they were given additional resources. Therefore, my thesis consists of research based on the results of my survey regarding the areas of law that students indicated interest in along with a series of seven infographics with easy to understand information about the First Amendment, the Sixth Amendment, women’s rights, arbitration, legal offenses and consequences, Arizona State University’s legal and emergency resources, and the main constitutional amendments students should be aware of. Students should understand the laws they must abide by as members of society as well as the constitutional rights they are guaranteed if they are expected to fully obey and use both as incoming adults of the United States of America.

ContributorsSlawson, Morgan (Author) / Hoekstra, Valerie (Thesis director) / Forst, Bradley (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor) / Economics Program in CLAS (Contributor)
Created2022-05
164461-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

Patients need to know current and available options for prosthetic devices. Devices are categorized depending on the region of amputation and their purpose. Retrospection on the history of prosthetic devices leading into modern ones allows for an interpretation of successes and necessary improvements moving forward. One promising avenue for prostheses

Patients need to know current and available options for prosthetic devices. Devices are categorized depending on the region of amputation and their purpose. Retrospection on the history of prosthetic devices leading into modern ones allows for an interpretation of successes and necessary improvements moving forward. One promising avenue for prostheses is the development of neuroprostheses that much more closely resemble some of the functionality taken for granted in natural limbs. Proprioception, more commonly known as the ‘sixth sense’, would be a very desirable characteristic of these devices and is the subject of current research efforts. In the meantime, it is necessary to help patients evaluate what products are out there that identify more strongly with their individualized preferences.

ContributorsClemmer, Brodie (Author) / Helms-Tillery, Stephen (Thesis director) / Hartwell, Leland (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor) / Harrington Bioengineering Program (Contributor)
Created2022-05
Description

For this study, I visited twenty Sprouts Farmers Market locations across the Phoenix-metro area to determine the company’s in-store strategy to make their locations a destination that customers pleasantly anticipate visiting. As a business student myself and a Sprouts employee, I have familiarity with the company and desired to learn

For this study, I visited twenty Sprouts Farmers Market locations across the Phoenix-metro area to determine the company’s in-store strategy to make their locations a destination that customers pleasantly anticipate visiting. As a business student myself and a Sprouts employee, I have familiarity with the company and desired to learn more about why Sprouts stores are so appealing and fun to visit. My method was to determine a representative sample of stores in the “Valley” to visit. At each location, I requested to speak with a manager and asked him or her four questions about that particular store. I also spent approximately forty minutes examining each location and observing details about each store according to a precomposed list of things to particularly notice but with room to add details regarding each store’s unique elements and commonalities with the other locations. The results of this study were rewarding, as at nineteen of the twenty stores I was able to speak with a manager who graciously answered my questions. I collected much data from these interviews and from my own observations. The most significant conclusion I reached was that Sprouts Farmers Market promotes health, natural-eating, freshness, and friendliness in every area. From pleasant employees to natural lighting to unique brands, Sprouts endeavors to carry products that meet the special dietary needs of each customer no matter how general or specific they may be. Another key discovery I made is that the entire company and each individual store revolves around the produce department. Because this is the core of the business, extra measures are taken to promote it, such as frequent produce deliveries to ensure fresh products are on the shelf, extra lighting in that part of the store, and frequent stocking and sweeping to keep the area full and clean. Additionally, the produce department has ample signage denoting organic and local products and information signs about how to consume various produce items, including information to learn about the farmers who grew the goods. Beyond these key elements of Sprouts Farmers Market, an intangible element exists which sets Sprouts apart from its competitors, and that is the personal touch. Sprouts’ employees are friendly, welcoming, and helpful. They are encouraged to ask customers if they need assistance and to inquire how their day is going. The employees are also educated on the products they sell as well as various dietary trends so that they can help shoppers find products that fit their needs. This warmth, helpfulness, and friendliness trickles down from the top management at each store and is communicated to the customers through their interactions with the employees. This personal touch is so important to Sprouts Farmers Market that the company even has a program to encourage employee helpfulness. It is called the “Yes” Program, and essentially empowers employees and managers to authorize price adjustments, exchanges, returns, and the like to assist and serve shoppers with exceptional customer service and provide whatever is necessary to make the customers happy and desirous to become repeat shoppers at Sprouts Farmers Market.

ContributorsHinkle, Amanda (Author) / Eaton, John (Thesis director) / Mokwa, Michael (Committee member) / Sinclair, Jack (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor) / Morrison School of Agribusiness (Contributor)
Created2022-05
164476-Thumbnail Image.png
Description

For this study, I visited twenty Sprouts Farmers Market locations across the Phoenix-metro area to determine the company’s in-store strategy to make their locations a destination that customers pleasantly anticipate visiting. As a business student myself and a Sprouts employee, I have familiarity with the company and desired to learn

For this study, I visited twenty Sprouts Farmers Market locations across the Phoenix-metro area to determine the company’s in-store strategy to make their locations a destination that customers pleasantly anticipate visiting. As a business student myself and a Sprouts employee, I have familiarity with the company and desired to learn more about why Sprouts stores are so appealing and fun to visit. My method was to determine a representative sample of stores in the “Valley” to visit. At each location, I requested to speak with a manager and asked him or her four questions about that particular store. I also spent approximately forty minutes examining each location and observing details about each store according to a precomposed list of things to particularly notice but with room to add details regarding each store’s unique elements and commonalities with the other locations. The results of this study were rewarding, as at nineteen of the twenty stores I was able to speak with a manager who graciously answered my questions. I collected much data from these interviews and from my own observations. The most significant conclusion I reached was that Sprouts Farmers Market promotes health, natural-eating, freshness, and friendliness in every area. From pleasant employees to natural lighting to unique brands, Sprouts endeavors to carry products that meet the special dietary needs of each customer no matter how general or specific they may be. Another key discovery I made is that the entire company and each individual store revolves around the produce department. Because this is the core of the business, extra measures are taken to promote it, such as frequent produce deliveries to ensure fresh products are on the shelf, extra lighting in that part of the store, and frequent stocking and sweeping to keep the area full and clean. Additionally, the produce department has ample signage denoting organic and local products and information signs about how to consume various produce items, including information to learn about the farmers who grew the goods. Beyond these key elements of Sprouts Farmers Market, an intangible element exists which sets Sprouts apart from its competitors, and that is the personal touch. Sprouts’ employees are friendly, welcoming, and helpful. They are encouraged to ask customers if they need assistance and to inquire how their day is going. The employees are also educated on the products they sell as well as various dietary trends so that they can help shoppers find products that fit their needs. This warmth, helpfulness, and friendliness trickles down from the top management at each store and is communicated to the customers through their interactions with the employees. This personal touch is so important to Sprouts Farmers Market that the company even has a program to encourage employee helpfulness. It is called the “Yes” Program, and essentially empowers employees and managers to authorize price adjustments, exchanges, returns, and the like to assist and serve shoppers with exceptional customer service and provide whatever is necessary to make the customers happy and desirous to become repeat shoppers at Sprouts Farmers Market.

ContributorsHinkle, Amanda (Author) / Eaton, John (Thesis director) / Mokwa, Michael (Committee member) / Sinclair, Jack (Committee member) / Barrett, The Honors College (Contributor) / Dean, W.P. Carey School of Business (Contributor)
Created2022-05