Matching Items (32)

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Difficulties for Chinese Vocalists in Singing French Art Song

Description

Late nineteenth-century French art song, also known as mélodie, is one of the most important genres in a classical singer’s repertoire and it cannot be ignored. Its creation represents a marked improvement over the song form of French Romance which

Late nineteenth-century French art song, also known as mélodie, is one of the most important genres in a classical singer’s repertoire and it cannot be ignored. Its creation represents a marked improvement over the song form of French Romance which dates from the eighteenth century.

French art song was not introduced to China until the establishment of the New Republic of China in 1949. In the decades since then, French art song seems less favored by Chinese singers, when compared to Italian songs and German Lieder. Having studied both in China and the United States, the author realized that for Chinese native speakers, singing French art song is a difficult challenge.

Two main problems immediately present themselves: the language barrier and the obstacle of a basic understanding of French poetry. The author’s purpose here is to examine these problems and try to help Chinese singers by offering them a systematic path toward correct French pronunciation, a brief discussion of poetic imagery often seen in French poetry, and a selected bibliography of sources on French poetry to advance their comprehension.

First, the paper will introduce the phonology of Pinyin (Chinese Phonetic Alphabet), the system used in China to teach Chinese (Mandarin) and compare it with the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet), which is universally used by people in the West to learn the pronunciation of most languages. The document will then show the sounds that are most challenging for Chinese singers and will give some suggestions and vocal exercises to help singers better pronounce French diction.

Secondly, the author will examine a few poems used in French songs to point out some of the cultural differences between China and Western countries and identify the challenges in understanding the meaning of selected French art songs from the perspective of a Chinese singer. Since an exhaustive study of French poetry would be another broad topic to be researched, the author will offer only basic suggestions and a brief annotated bibliography of sources at the end of this research project.

It is the author's hope that this document will benefit Chinese singers and voice teachers by acquainting them with French diction and by helping them to appreciate French song literature.

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Date Created
2019

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A Textual and Musical Commentary on J. Guy Ropartz’s Quatre Poèmes après l’Intermezzo d’Henri Heine (1899)

Description

Heinrich Heine’s collection of poems, Lyrisches Intermezzo, is well-known in music circles, largely due to Robert Schumann’s settings of sixteen of these poems in his masterwork Dichterliebe. Because of Dichterliebe’s place of importance in art song literature, many other

Heinrich Heine’s collection of poems, Lyrisches Intermezzo, is well-known in music circles, largely due to Robert Schumann’s settings of sixteen of these poems in his masterwork Dichterliebe. Because of Dichterliebe’s place of importance in art song literature, many other settings of Heine’s sixty-five poems are often overlooked. Breton-born composer Joseph Guy Marie Ropartz composed Quatre Poèmes d’après l’Intermezzo d’Henri Heine in 1899, after having collaborated on a new French translation of the entire Lyrisches Intermezzo in 1890. This cycle is rarely performed, largely due to Ropartz’s relative obscurity as a composer, as the focus of his career was administration of two regional conservatories in France. The Quatre Poèmes were written fairly early in Ropartz’s life, but feature many compositional techniques that remain staples of Ropartz’s work throughout his career. It is an accessible work to many singers and audience members already familiar with Heine. The texts of the four songs are not simply translations of Heine’s original, but altered to adhere to the rules of French poetry. Examining the changes made in the text, both in language and structure, reveals information that will aid performers’ understanding of the poetry and of Ropartz’s choices in musical setting. The music of the work is greatly dependent on a single motive, an idée fixe, and considering the role of this motive in its various appearances is illuminating to the narrative arc of the cycle. This study seeks to aid potential performers and listeners of the Quatre Poèmes by expanding their understanding of the artists responsible for creating it, and by exploring the textual and musical elements that are the building blocks of this work.

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Date Created
2019

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Rhythmic Notation and Syncopation in Broadway Pop Rock Music

Description

When rock music began to appear on Broadway in the 1960s with Bye Bye Birdie and Hair, it opened up the door for new styles to be notated into musical theater scores. Since then, a wide variety of rock and

When rock music began to appear on Broadway in the 1960s with Bye Bye Birdie and Hair, it opened up the door for new styles to be notated into musical theater scores. Since then, a wide variety of rock and pop genres have been incorporated into Broadway shows. Musical theater scores are representations of the show structure, and how rhythm and syncopation are notated in musical theater score affects how they are interpreted and performed.The past twenty years have seen a growth in popularity of both revivals and jukebox musicals. A revival is a show that appears on Broadway again after the original production; jukebox musicals take an already produced pop rock album or artist and create a loosely structured narrative around it. By analyzing rhythmic notation and syncopations in revivals and jukebox musicals, this paper demonstrates how popular culture and rhythmic notation interact with each other to create complexity in musical scores and performances. Centering around the musical Godspell as a core example, this paper examines rhythmic notation in pop rock musical theater, investigating how revivals and jukebox musicals can contribute to increased rhythmic complexity in scores.
This paper articulates the possibilities of a rhythmic notation system that would simplify the complex and frequent syncopations in pop rock musical scores. Eastman professor David Temperley’s work in rock syncopation and deep structure representation is discussed as it relates to musical theater scores. Expanding on Temperley’s theoretical foundation, the appendices demonstrate a proposed original arrow notation with an original song composed for these research purposes.

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Date Created
2021

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A closer look: the art of Pete Fountain's clarinet language and techniques

Description

This project uses fourteen transcriptions of Pete Fountain’s solos as examples to

demonstrate traditional jazz clarinet techniques and language in terms of motives,

patterns, and a variety of articulations. This project also includes guidelines on how to

practice jazz improvisation as well as

This project uses fourteen transcriptions of Pete Fountain’s solos as examples to

demonstrate traditional jazz clarinet techniques and language in terms of motives,

patterns, and a variety of articulations. This project also includes guidelines on how to

practice jazz improvisation as well as how to apply Fountain’s techniques and jazz

language to one’s own improvisation. Though there are countless musicians who have

made remarkable contributions to the development of the jazz language, Pete Fountain’s

unique style is particularly worthy of study due to his massive media presence, effortless

playing techniques, unique tone quality, and showmanship throughout his career.

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Created

Date Created
2019

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Insights into an Original SSAA Choral Work of Donald Patriquin: Songs of Innocence: On Poems of William Blake

Description

Canadian composer, conductor, pianist, and organist Donald Patriquin (b. 1938) is

best known for his choral folksong arrangements but is also a composer of many original

works. Songs of Innocence, which Patriquin calls “one of my very best choral works,”

exemplifies his approach

Canadian composer, conductor, pianist, and organist Donald Patriquin (b. 1938) is

best known for his choral folksong arrangements but is also a composer of many original

works. Songs of Innocence, which Patriquin calls “one of my very best choral works,”

exemplifies his approach to setting text to music and provides a rich opportunity for

understanding Patriquin’s method of selecting text, creating a kind of libretto out of the

available text, setting the text to music, and conceiving of and composing instrumental

parts equal in importance to the choral parts. Also evident in this work is his attention to

such elements as precise word painting, varied theoretical approaches, and a general

musical aesthetic that focuses on beauty. This quintessential composition provides

important insights into Patriquin’s personal artistry and his approach to composition.

Patriquin does not fit text to music; instead, all of the musical elements are generated out

of the textual nuances. Patriquin’s comments on the work and his process, gleaned from

extensive email correspondence and his attendance at the U.S. premiere of the work,

provide important insights that can inform conductors and singers of his music. The study

of this suite highlights Patriquin’s expert crafting of musical elements and the methodical

layering of elements he combines to tell the musical story. Pairing Patriquin’s email

correspondence with an in-depth look at Songs of Innocence reveals his overarching

compositional ideas and underlying musical motivations.

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Created

Date Created
2017

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Stefania Turkevych's Heart of Oksana (1969): A Critical Edition of a Lost Ukrainian Opera

Description

It is no secret that the Soviet Union silenced the voices of many artists, but pieces of this history are still emerging—including the story of Ukraine's first female composer to achieve professional renown: Stefania Turkevych (1898-1977). Although the quantity and

It is no secret that the Soviet Union silenced the voices of many artists, but pieces of this history are still emerging—including the story of Ukraine's first female composer to achieve professional renown: Stefania Turkevych (1898-1977). Although the quantity and quality of Turkevych's compositional output should have established her as a major international figure, most of her work remains unpublished. Turkevych is absent from both Grove Music and Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart (MGG Online). There is a clear need for English-language biographical materials about Turkevych and for publication of her works.

This document represents the first critical edition of Turkevych’s three-act chamber opera, Серце Оксани (The Heart of Oksana), commissioned in 1969 for the 100th anniversary of the creation of Canada’s Province of Manitoba (and its subsequent settlement by members of the Ukrainian diasporic community). The score is prefaced by brief introductions to both Turkevych and Серце Оксани as well as an explanation of editorial procedure and a critical report.

Lost Soviet-era voices carry particular social and political weight as present-day Ukraine reclaims an identity that moves beyond reductive “Russian vs. European” dichotomies, and solidifying that identity seems even more urgent against the backdrop of the current Donbass War (2013-present). This project represents the first step in a much longer-term effort to unearth and share Turkevych’s story and overlooked contributions as a composer, teacher, and lifelong advocate of Ukraine’s language and culture.

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Date Created
2020