Matching Items (8)

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A War for Drugs, A War Against Womxn: Uncovering the Feminicidio Epidemic of Machista Cartels and Government

Description

Femicide, the purposeful killing of women because they are women, has become a systemic epidemic in Mexico much do in part to two machista actors over the past few decades.

Femicide, the purposeful killing of women because they are women, has become a systemic epidemic in Mexico much do in part to two machista actors over the past few decades. These two actors are drug trafficking organizations, better known as cartels, and the government of Mexico at all levels. The investigations by many non-governmental organizations, like Amnesty International, and those by international governmental organizations, like UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), have estimated that an average of 7 women are killed per day simply because of their gender, and the government has yet to take their urgent recommendations to enact true changing legislation. Meanwhile, the government continues to provide impunity for the murders, many times cartel members. Thus, while cartels are the perpetrators of violence against women and use their body counts as a weapon of war resulting in the majority of cases of femicide, the Mexican government are using their body counts as a tool for political repression and resorting to their machista culture. This thesis works to further provide evidence of this through investigating failed laws and programs set by the government and revealing links between machismo - intense hypermasculinity - and the reason by which these perpetrators of genocide continue to do so, especially in places like Ciudad Juarez. The paper ultimately explains that cartels and governments, use women's fear of being killed to make them solidify their power over them and the country of Mexico as a whole. Recommendations to end this genocide includes holding the government completely accountable for their blatant wrongdoings against women as a population, place more women in positions of governmental power, and ensuring that corrupt and self-interested officials do not get placed into office as well as ensuring that impunity is not seen as the absolute for killing, raping, or violating women at any level in Mexico.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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What We Miss When We Define an Entire Human Experience With One Word: 'Homeless'

Description

With homelessness existing in the complex web of poverty that persists in the living environments that stretch across this nation, it has become incredibly important to understand the intricacies that

With homelessness existing in the complex web of poverty that persists in the living environments that stretch across this nation, it has become incredibly important to understand the intricacies that navigate and perpetuate this in our society. With homelessness being an individual experience of struggle and survival, the current dialogue does not reflect such. The current dialogue communicates homelessness as a shared hardship, a result of similar decisions. Such dialogue has shown to be malevolent and accusatory, as it makes no room to portray the individual experience, and the actual cause and perpetuation of such a living situation. Attached to the concept of homelessness are specific stereotypes, generalizations, and negative assumptions, which go into creating the grounds for biases and stigma that revolve around the image of homelessness. To gauge the current dialogue that exists around homelessness and how this dialogue is internalized, one-on-one interviews were conducted. These interviews produced narratives that were pieced together to present a more inclusive, understanding, and holistic dialogue around the concept and human experience of homelessness, and poverty altogether. These narratives reveal the flaws and social injustices that are posed by the current dialogue, and further provide the necessary pieces to improve such conversations. In transforming the current dialogue, the human experience of homelessness can be greater understood and, therefore, redefine the vitality of a shared humanity.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Studying the Success of Promotoras and Determining Roadblocks for Implementation

Description

My Honors thesis examines how promotoras, otherwise known as community health workers, can be beneficial to a community and any challenges that might be faced when implementing this program.

My Honors thesis examines how promotoras, otherwise known as community health workers, can be beneficial to a community and any challenges that might be faced when implementing this program. My honors thesis will provide the history of promotoras, context on various health issues Latinx face historically and with the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, and finally address the findings of my interviews and shadowing of promotoras.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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The Arizona Global Development Network and The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals: A Case Study of Arizona’s NGOs

Description

The Arizona Global Development Network (AGDN) is a group of diverse nonprofit organizations within the state. This network is a platform for member organizations to collaborate and exchange ideas on

The Arizona Global Development Network (AGDN) is a group of diverse nonprofit organizations within the state. This network is a platform for member organizations to collaborate and exchange ideas on a wide range of topics regarding international development. Announced in 2016, the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) consists of 17 goals determined by the United Nations to address complex issues regarding human health, inequality and the environment around the globe. This self-designed code categorization study and semi-structured qualitative interviews aimed to explore Arizona’s international impacts and its alignment to the SDGs. First, the study completed a comprehensive observation of the information presented on these organizations’ websites. Second, interviews were conducted with representatives from each organization. The findings of this study provide an in-depth understanding of the network’s contributions to the wider, international community.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Establishing a Health Practice in the U. S. by a Mexican National: A Study into the Public Policy, Business and International Components of Urgent Care in Arizona

Description

Establishing a healthcare practice in the U. S. by a Mexican national involves many different steps at federal as well as state levels. The recent implementation of the Patient Protection

Establishing a healthcare practice in the U. S. by a Mexican national involves many different steps at federal as well as state levels. The recent implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act overhauls some requirements which include increased Medicaid eligibility as well as mandatory health insurance coverage. With these changes taking place over the next few years, the need for healthcare providers will expand. Consequently, I look into the requirements of establishing an urgent care practice in the state of Arizona. Given that Phoenix has a 40.8% Hispanic population and that the Affordable Care Act will increase the coverage of this demographic, it is the city of focus for my analysis. In order to make access to the Arizona healthcare market more impartial and accessible to Mexican entrepreneurs, changes need to be made to the certification process of medical physicians who graduated from Mexican universities. The general disadvantage of Mexican physicians as compared to their U. S. counterparts comes in the form of increased certification times and additional processes. An equal playing field will allow the ease in movement of medical physicians between the U. S. and Mexico which will help meet the increased demand over the next few years. From ownership to taxation and medical billing and coding, this analysis focuses on the many requirements needed to establish an urgent care in Arizona.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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The Road to Economic Empowerment: Narratives of Eritrean Refugee Women's Resettlement Experiences in Phoenix, AZ

Description

This thesis examines the lived experiences of nine Eritrean refugee women resettled in Phoenix through personal narratives to understand their struggles towards achieving economic empowerment. Through in-depth, semi-structured interviews, the

This thesis examines the lived experiences of nine Eritrean refugee women resettled in Phoenix through personal narratives to understand their struggles towards achieving economic empowerment. Through in-depth, semi-structured interviews, the women shared their upbringing, resettlement journey, adjustment in Phoenix, Arizona, and reflections on gender and cultural issues that impact their lives. The women interviewed were between ages 18-46 with varying levels of English, education, and work experience. Interviews with agency staff members and volunteers familiar with refugee women's empowerment and/or Eritrean refugee women were also conducted. By evaluating the women's voices and stories, this thesis aims to propose relevant, culturally appropriate, and sustainable services that can effectively address the women's needs and understand the factors that can empower them in their new communities. Major themes that emerged from the women's narratives include the desire to organize and reach out beyond the refugee community, the importance of English language, mixed expectations of assistance and life in the U.S, and the social status of women in Eritrean culture. Based on the women's feedback, a meaningful group would incorporate elements such as improving language, connecting with culturally-familiar mentors, flexible scheduling, developing small businesses, and resources for income generation and educational opportunities. Eventual participation in the women's empowerment programs offered by local agencies is also recommended.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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The Hadza Hunter Gatherer Tribe of Northern Tanzania; The Struggle to Attain Land Rights and Preserve a Traditional Way of Life

Description

This paper is about the Hadzabe hunter-gatherer tribe of Northern Tanzania, East-Africa. It outlines their current circumstances and their struggles with land loss, food scarcity, development and conflict with other

This paper is about the Hadzabe hunter-gatherer tribe of Northern Tanzania, East-Africa. It outlines their current circumstances and their struggles with land loss, food scarcity, development and conflict with other ethnic groups. In addition to exploring the complexities faced by indigenous peoples in a developing country, this paper also explores possible sustainable solutions in moving forward, in particular, the attainment of land rights and involvement in the tourism industry.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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(En)gendering food justice: identity and possibility within the American alternative food movement

Description

Research demonstrates that the contemporary global food system is unsustainable, and moreover, because some groups carry the burden of that unsustainability more than others, it is unjust. While some threads

Research demonstrates that the contemporary global food system is unsustainable, and moreover, because some groups carry the burden of that unsustainability more than others, it is unjust. While some threads of food activism in the United States have attempted to respond to these structural based inequalities--primarily those of race, ethnicity, and social class--overall, very little domestic activism has focused on issues of gender. As feminist scholarship makes clear, however, a food movement "gender gap" does not mean that gender is irrelevant to food experiences, social activism, or agricultural sustainability. Building on a framework of feminist food studies, food justice activism, and feminist social movement theory, this dissertation makes the case for "(en)gendering" the domestic alternative food activist movement, first by demonstrating how gender shapes experiences within food movement spaces, and second, by exploring the impact that an absence of gender awareness has on the individual, community, and organizational levels of the movement. Employing a feminist-informed hybrid of grounded theory and social movement research methods, field research for this dissertation was conducted in community gardens located in Seattle, Washington and Phoenix, Arizona during the summers of 2011 and 2012. With the assistance of NVivo qualitative data analysis software, field notes and twenty-one key-informant interviews were analyzed, as were the discourses found in the publically available marketing materials and policies of domestic food justice organizations. This study's findings at the individual and community level are hopeful, suggesting that when men are involved in food movement work, they become more aware of food-based gender inequalities and more supportive of women's leadership opportunities. Additionally, at the organizational level, this study also finds that where food sovereignty is influencing domestic activism, gender is beginning to enter the discussion. The project concludes with policy recommendations for both community gardening and food justice organizations and the detailing of a new concept of "feminist food justice", with the end goal of preventing the food movement from undermining its own potential to secure a "real alternative" to corporate industrial agriculture.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013