Matching Items (27)

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Self-Efficacy and Learning of Engineering Concepts Through Gamification

Description

The relationship between video games and education is something that has been studied extensively in academia. Based upon these studies a new concept was created, gamification. Gamification is the next step in video game research to analyze why video games

The relationship between video games and education is something that has been studied extensively in academia. Based upon these studies a new concept was created, gamification. Gamification is the next step in video game research to analyze why video games enhance learning. The interest and research into this concept have developed so much so that it has become its own topic area for research. This study is looking to analyze the effect that gamification has on not only learning, but also self-efficacy. Through a choose your own adventure game, the knowledge and self-efficacy of participants will be examined to observe the differences when learning difficult engineering concepts with and without gamification. It is expected that participants that experienced training through gamification will demonstrate deeper learning and higher self-efficacy than trained through a video. Furthermore, it is anticipated that some video trained participants’ self-efficacy will increase; however, their comprehension will be less than participants trained through gamification. The results of this study can help promote the interest in researching gamification and education, while influencing educators to corporate gamification elements when designing their courses. Moreover, this study continued through adaptation and integration into a statics forces class, investigated if the same results can be found within a classroom setting.

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2020-05

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The Perception of The Mental Game within Archery

Description

This study used an online survey methodology looking at all levels of archers and coaches to understand their perceptions of the shooting process and Mental Game importance. The survey asked about the archer's skill level and their training style, as

This study used an online survey methodology looking at all levels of archers and coaches to understand their perceptions of the shooting process and Mental Game importance. The survey asked about the archer's skill level and their training style, as well as their perception of the importance of each step in the shooting process and the different parts of the Mental Game. The study also processed the impact of performance of an archer based on their perception of importance of the different steps of the shooting process and the Mental Game. Depending on if the archer has ever had a coach, certain steps of the shooting process and certain parts of the Mental Game was impacted by having a coach at one time. While, the level of coach also impacts how the Mental Game is perceived. Throughout this study, imagery was the most impacted by the level of coach the participant is, if the participants have ever had a coach, and how the participants perform.

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2018-05

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Teamwork in Orchestras

Description

The knowledge of cognitive processes of teams and how they work as a system, has drastically broadened in recent years. However, few researchers have applied their findings to an orchestral setting. In the current study, team cognition was observed and

The knowledge of cognitive processes of teams and how they work as a system, has drastically broadened in recent years. However, few researchers have applied their findings to an orchestral setting. In the current study, team cognition was observed and analyzed based off an 8th grade orchestra, in addition to the middle and highest-level orchestras at a junior high and high school in the Arizona Public School system. It was found, that in the 8th grade orchestra, most communication is either given or received in the form of auditory cues both verbal and musical. Regardless of skill level, groups that have higher interactions during practices have better performances.

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2018-05

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Emergency Preparedness in a Zombie World

Description

Young adults do not know basic emergency preparedness skills. Although there are materials out there such as printed and online materials form Center for Disease Control, it is unlikely that college-age people will take the time to read them. Some

Young adults do not know basic emergency preparedness skills. Although there are materials out there such as printed and online materials form Center for Disease Control, it is unlikely that college-age people will take the time to read them. Some individuals have addressed the issue of young adults not wanting to read materials by creating a fun interactive game in the San Francisco area, but since the game must be played in person, a solution like that can only reach so far. Studies suggest that virtual worlds are effective in teaching people new skills, so I have created a virtual world that will teach people basic emergency preparedness skills in a way that is memorable and appealing to a college-age audience. The logic used to teach players the concepts of emergency preparedness is case-based reasoning. Case-based reasoning is the process of solving new problems by remembering similar solutions in the past. By creating a simulation emergency situation in a virtual world, young adults are more likely to know what to do in the case of an actual emergency.

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2017-05

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The Development and Validation of LGBT Bias Content for Use in an Online Training Program

Description

Previous research has shown that an individual's bias can have a negative impact on behavior. One proposed method of modifying such behavior is vicarious (observational) learning. In the current study, the researcher explored the possibility of using vicarious learning to

Previous research has shown that an individual's bias can have a negative impact on behavior. One proposed method of modifying such behavior is vicarious (observational) learning. In the current study, the researcher explored the possibility of using vicarious learning to create an effective training video on LGBT bias. The researcher predicted that a vicarious learning video would be more effective at reducing negative LGBT bias than an informationally-equivalent control video. Participants completed the Explicit Attitudes of Sexuality questionnaire (EASQ), were randomized into one of two groups (vicarious or control), watched the assigned training video, and then completed the EASQ again to measure any changes in LGBT bias. The results of the study indicated that the vicarious video was no more effective in reducing negative LGBT bias when compared to the control. Additionally it was found that the vicarious training video was significantly more effective in eliciting new knowledge when compared to the control. The researcher discusses these findings in relation to Social Cognitive Theory for Personal and Social Change by Enabling Media. The researcher also explains how findings of insignificance could have been caused by a selection bias, self-report bias, and/or not enough treatment dosage.

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Date Created
2016-05

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Perceptions of Writing Errors

Description

This study set out to determine how students perceive writing quality in the presence of specific errors. Error pattern was a within-subjects variable with four levels: no errors, superficial (mechanical) errors, substantive (conceptual) errors, and both types of errors. All

This study set out to determine how students perceive writing quality in the presence of specific errors. Error pattern was a within-subjects variable with four levels: no errors, superficial (mechanical) errors, substantive (conceptual) errors, and both types of errors. All participants assessed a randomized selection of four essays containing each of the four error patterns. Overall ratings of writing quality decreased with the presence of errors; superficial errors had a significantly larger impact than substantive errors. In addition, participants rated traits about the author of the essays lower with the presence of errors in a similar pattern to writing quality.

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2016-05

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A Look into Measuring Trust in Medical Devices

Description

The purpose of this review is to determine how to measure and assess human trust in medical technology. A systematic literature review was selected as the path to understand the landscape for measuring trust up to this point. I started

The purpose of this review is to determine how to measure and assess human trust in medical technology. A systematic literature review was selected as the path to understand the landscape for measuring trust up to this point. I started by creating a method of systematically reading through related studies in databases before summarizing results and concluding with a recommended design for the upcoming study. This required searching several databases and learning each advanced search methods for each in order to determine which databases provided the most relevant results. From there, the reader examined the results, keeping track in a spreadsheet. The first pass through filtered out the results which did not include detailed methods of measuring trust. The second pass took detailed notes on the remaining studies, keeping track of authors, participants, subjects, methods, instruments, issues, limitations, analytics, and validation. After summarizing the results, discussing trends in the results, and mentioning limitations a conclusion was devised. The recommendation is to use an uncompressed self-reported questionnaire with 4-10 questions on a six-point-Likert scale with reversing scales throughout. Though the studies analyzed were specific to medical settings, this method can work outside of the medical setting for measuring human trust.

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Date Created
2020-05

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Haptic Learning: The Effects of Multimedia Learning on Haptic Robotic Operation

Description

This is a report on an experiment that examines if the principles of multimedia learning outlined in Richard E. Mayer’s journal article, “Using multimedia for e-learning”, located in the Journal of Computer Assisted Learning would apply to haptic feedback used

This is a report on an experiment that examines if the principles of multimedia learning outlined in Richard E. Mayer’s journal article, “Using multimedia for e-learning”, located in the Journal of Computer Assisted Learning would apply to haptic feedback used for haptic robotic operation. This was tested by developing and using a haptic robotic manipulator known as the Haptic Testbed (HTB). The HTB is a manipulator designed to emulate human hand movement for haptic testing purposes and features an index finger and thumb for the right hand. Control is conducted through a Leap Motion Controller, a visual sensor that uses infrared lights and cameras to gather various data about hands it can see. The goal of the experiment was to have test subjects complete a task where they shifted objects along a circuit of positions where they were measured on time to complete the circuit as well as accuracy in reaching the individual points. Analysis of subject responses to surveys as well as performance during the experiment showed haptic feedback during training improving initial performance of individuals as well as lowering mental effort and mental demand during said training. The findings of this experiment showed support for the hypothesis that Mayer’s principles do apply to haptic feedback in training for haptic robotic manipulation. One of the implications of this experiment would be the possibility for haptics and tactile senses to be an applicable sense for Mayer’s principles of multimedia learning as most of the current work in the field is mostly focused on visual or auditory senses. If the results of the experiment were replicated in a future experiment it would provide support to the hypothesis that the principles of multimedia learning can be utilized to improve the training of haptic robotic operation.

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Date Created
2019-05

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The relationship between learning persistence and equipment design through the lens of expectancy-value theory

Description

Learners' attitudes and beliefs during the initial stages of learning have a profound impact on their future decisions, practice habits, and persistence. In music education, however, surprisingly little research has explored how physical equipment design might influence novices' attitudes and

Learners' attitudes and beliefs during the initial stages of learning have a profound impact on their future decisions, practice habits, and persistence. In music education, however, surprisingly little research has explored how physical equipment design might influence novices' attitudes and beliefs. The current study addresses this gap by examining how novices' motivation and perception differ based on the physical design of the musical instrument they interact with while learning. Fifty-two adult participants completed an online survey measuring their expectancies (e.g., confidence), value beliefs (e.g., enjoyment, interest, and social merit), and anticipated persistence while attempting to learn the electric guitar. Afterward, participants attempted to learn and perform several beginner-level tasks while using a conventionally designed or ergonomically designed guitar. The conventionally designed guitar was a commercially available model marketed toward beginner and intermediate-level guitarists. In contrast, the ergonomic guitar was a custom model based on expert design recommendations to improve ease of use, comfort, and user experience. Participant learning expectations and values were assessed before and after a one-hour practice session. Results revealed that novices who used the ergonomic guitar reported significant gains in anticipated learning enjoyment. Alternatively, novices who used the conventional guitar exhibited no such change. Beyond this relationship however, the ergonomic guitar was not found to meaningfully affect participants' confidence, interest, physical discomfort, and task difficulty perceptions. Additionally, the ergonomic guitar did not have a statistically significant influence on learning persistence ratings. One important implication extracted from this study is that a single practice session may not provide enough time or experience to affect a novices' attitudes and beliefs toward learning. Future studies may seek to remedy this study limitation by using a longitudinal design or longer practice task trials. Despite this limitation however, this exploratory study highlights the need for researchers, music educators, and instrument manufacturers to carefully consider how the physical design of a musical instrument may impact learning attitudes, choices, and persistence over time. Additionally, this study offers the first attempt at extending the equipment design literature to music education and Expectancy-Value Theory.

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Date Created
2016

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Effects of Looming Auditory FCW on Brake Reaction Time under Conditions of Distraction

Description

In 2013, 1.8 million US drivers were responsible for rear-end collisions with other vehicles (NHTSA 2014), for which driver distraction has been identified as the main factor (Campbell, Smith & Najm, 2003; Knipling, Mironer, Hendricks, Tijerina, Everson, Allen & Wilson

In 2013, 1.8 million US drivers were responsible for rear-end collisions with other vehicles (NHTSA 2014), for which driver distraction has been identified as the main factor (Campbell, Smith & Najm, 2003; Knipling, Mironer, Hendricks, Tijerina, Everson, Allen & Wilson 1993; Wang, Knipling & Goodman, 1996). The ubiquity of cell phones and their use behind the wheel has played a major role in distracting these drivers. To mitigate this, some manufacturers are equipping vehicles with forward collision warning (FCW) systems.

Generally, warnings that are perceived as being urgent produce lower response times. One technique for increasing perceived urgency of a warning is called looming, where the signal increases in or more dimensions over time. Looming warning signals have been shown to produce low response times, likely because the recipient perceives the signal as a potential approaching threat, prompting defensive reactions (Graziano and Cooke, 2006).

The present study evaluates the effect of veridical (intensity increases at the rate of closure with the lead vehicle) and high urgency (intensity increases at a rate of Time to Collision minus 0.5 seconds) looming FCW, as well as a static FCW, on drivers’ brake reaction times in the presence of a secondary texting task. Participants’ brake reaction times were recorded as they followed a lead car in a driving simulator, encountering multiple sudden-braking events across the five conditions (a control condition as well as four counterbalanced conditions using a secondary texting task). In the four conditions with a secondary task, participants received no FCW, static FCW, veridical FCW, and high-urgency FCW, respectively. Performance data was analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA, and a series of pairwise comparisons were then made using Bonferroni corrected pairwise t-tests.

The presence of a visually and manually distracting secondary task (texting) seems to diminish the performance of the looming signals as compared to previous studies that did not use a distraction component. While looming FCW do seem to effectively lower BRTs when the driver is distracted, it is recommended that further research investigate the relationship between secondary task types and their respective levels of distraction, and the effectiveness of auditory looming FCW.

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2016