Matching Items (1)

136525-Thumbnail Image.png

A Modeling System to Understand the Design and Performance of a Two Spool Gas Turbine Engine

Description

The purpose of my Honors Thesis was to generate a tool that could be implemented by Aerospace students at Arizona State University. This tool was created using MatLab which is

The purpose of my Honors Thesis was to generate a tool that could be implemented by Aerospace students at Arizona State University. This tool was created using MatLab which is the current program students are using. The modeling system that was generated goes step-by-step through the flow of a two spool gas turbine engine. The code was then compared to an ideal case engine with predictable values. It was found to have less than a 3 percent error for these parameters, which included optimal net work produced, optimal overall pressure ratio, and maximum pressure ratio. The modeling system was then run through a parametric analysis. In the first case, the bypass ratio was set to 0 and the freestream Mach number was set to 0. The second case was with a bypass ratio of 0 and fresstream Mach number of 0.85. The third case was with a bypass ratio of 5 and freestream Mach number of 0. The fourth case was with a bypass ratio of 5 and fresstream Mach number of 0.85. Each of these cases was run at various overall pressure ratios and maximum Temperatures of 1500 K, 1600 K and 1700 K. The results modeled the behavior that was expected. As the freestream Mach number was increased, the thrust decreased and the thrust specific fuel consumption increased, corresponding to an increase in total pressure at the combustor inlet. It was also found that the thrust was increased and the thrust specific fuel consumption decreased as the bypass ratio was increased. These results also make sense as there is less airflow passing through the engine core. Finally the engine was compared to two real engines. Both of which are General Electric G6 series engines. For the 80C2A3 engine, the percent difference between thrust and thrust specific fuel consumption was less than five percent. For the 50B, the thrust was below a two percent difference, but the thrust specific fuel consumption clearly provided inaccurate results. This could be caused by the lack of inputs provided by General Electric. The amount of fuel injected is largely dependent on the maximum temperature which is not available to the public. Overall, the code produces comparable results to real engines and can display how isolating and modifying a certain parameter effects engine performance.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05