Matching Items (383)

132147-Thumbnail Image.png

Prototyping a Mobile Application Aimed to Streamline the Process of Preparing for Medical School Applications

Description

Less than half of all premedical applicants get accepted into a medical school, 39.3% of applicants to be precise, and that statistic is based on the number of matriculants out

Less than half of all premedical applicants get accepted into a medical school, 39.3% of applicants to be precise, and that statistic is based on the number of matriculants out of the total applicants in 2015. With such a discouraging acceptance rate, many students who start out as premed are often not towards the end of their undergraduate career and post-graduation because they do not feel prepared for medical school. It’s difficult for premed students to find all the information they need in one place rather than going from place to place or school website to school website. Additionally, it can be a hassle for premeds to keep track of all their coursework and calculate separate GPAs for each category especially due to how annoying Excel spread sheets can be. This is where the conceptualization of Premed Portfolio comes in. Premed Portfolio is a prototype mobile application. Premed Portfolio aims to streamline the process of preparing for medical school by guiding students to create a portfolio aimed to address the most important aspects of a medical school application. Students will be able to keep track of their cumulative GPA, BCPM (also known as science/math) GPA, MCAT Scores, prerequisite coursework and many more targeted areas of medical school. Premed Portfolio will also hope to use the stats that students provide and educate them on their chances of getting into medical school.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132493-Thumbnail Image.png

Empowering Women in Zambia through Computational Thinking Curriculum

Description

The nonprofit organization, I Am Zambia, works to give supplemental education to young women in Lusaka. I Am Zambia is creating sustainable change by educating these females, who can then

The nonprofit organization, I Am Zambia, works to give supplemental education to young women in Lusaka. I Am Zambia is creating sustainable change by educating these females, who can then lift their families and communities out of poverty. The ultimate goal of this thesis was to explore and implement high level systematic problem solving through basic and specialized computational thinking curriculum at I Am Zambia in order to give these women an even larger stepping stool into a successful future.

To do this, a 4-week long pilot curriculum was created, implemented, and tested through an optional class at I Am Zambia, available to women who had already graduated from the year-long I Am Zambia Academy program. A total of 18 women ages 18-24 chose to enroll in the course. There were a total of 10 lessons, taught over 20 class period. These lessons covered four main computational thinking frameworks: introduction to computational thinking, algorithmic thinking, pseudocode, and debugging. Knowledge retention was tested through the use of a CS educational tool, QuizIt, created by the CSI Lab of School of Computing, Informatics and Decision Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. Furthermore, pre and post tests were given to assess the successfulness of the curriculum in teaching students the aforementioned concepts. 14 of the 18 students successfully completed the pre and post test.

Limitations of this study and suggestions for how to improve this curriculum in order to extend it into a year long course are also presented at the conclusion of this paper.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132640-Thumbnail Image.png

An IoT Solution to Air Quality Monitoring

Description

Pollution is an increasing problem around the world, and one of the main forms it takes is air pollution. Air pollution, from oxides and dioxides to particulate matter, continues to

Pollution is an increasing problem around the world, and one of the main forms it takes is air pollution. Air pollution, from oxides and dioxides to particulate matter, continues to contribute to millions of deaths each year, which is more than the next three leading causes of environment-related death combined. Plus, the problem is only growing as industrial plants, factories, and transportation continues to rapidly increase across the globe. Those most affected include less developed countries and individuals with pre-existing respiratory conditions. Although many citizens know about this issue, it is often unclear what times and locations are worst in terms of pollutant concentration as it can vary on the time of day, local activity, and other variable factors. As a result, citizens lack the knowledge and resources to properly combat or avoid air pollution, as well as the data and evidence to support any sort of regulatory change. Many companies and organizations have tried to address this through Air Quality Indexes (AQIs) but are not focused enough to help the everyday citizen, and often fail to include many significant pollutants. Thus, we sought to address this issue in a cost-effective way through creating a network of IoT (Internet of Things) devices and deploying them in a select area of Tempe, Arizona. We utilized Arduino Microprocessors and Wireless Radio Frequency Transceivers to send and receive air pollution data in real time. Then, displayed this data in such a way that it could be released to the public via web or mobile app. Furthermore, the product is cheap enough to be reproduced and sold in bulk as well as scaled and customized to be compatible with dozens of different air quality sensors.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132649-Thumbnail Image.png

Privacy-guaranteed Data Collection: The Case for Efficient Resource Management of Nonprofit Organizations

Description

Through the personal experience of volunteering at ASU Project Humanities, an organization that provides resources such as clothing and toiletries to the homeless population in Downtown Phoenix, I noticed efficiently

Through the personal experience of volunteering at ASU Project Humanities, an organization that provides resources such as clothing and toiletries to the homeless population in Downtown Phoenix, I noticed efficiently serving the needs of the homeless population is an important endeavor, but the current processes for Phoenix nonprofits to collect data are manual, ad-hoc, and inefficient. This leads to the research question: is it possible to improve this process of collecting statistics on client needs, tracking donations, and managing resources using technology? Background research includes an interview with ASU Project Humanities, articles by analysts, and related work including case studies of current technologies in the nonprofit community. Major findings include i) a lack of centralized communication in nonprofits collecting needs, tracking surplus donations, and sharing resources, ii) privacy assurance is important to homeless individuals, and iii) pre-existing databases and technological solutions have demonstrated that technology has the ability to make an impact in the nonprofit community. To improve the process, standardization, efficiency, and automation need to increase. As a result of my analysis, the thesis proposes a prototype solution which includes two parts: an inventory database and a web application with forms for user input and tables for the user to view. This solution addresses standardization by showing a consistent way of collecting data on need requests and surplus donations while guaranteeing privacy of homeless individuals. This centralized solution also increases efficiency by connecting different agencies that cater to these clients. Lastly, the solution demonstrates the ability for resources to be made available to each organization which can increase automation. In conclusion, this database and web application has the potential to improve nonprofit organizations’ networking capabilities, resource management, and resource distribution. The percentile of homeless individuals connected to these resources is expected to increase substantially with future live testing and large-scale implementation.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132341-Thumbnail Image.png

Mobile App Development: The Use of Apache Cordova to Construct Features for iOS and Android Applications

Description

Mobile app development has been the fastest growing software development since the release of the iPhone in 2007 and the creation of the App Store in 2008. After the rise

Mobile app development has been the fastest growing software development since the release of the iPhone in 2007 and the creation of the App Store in 2008. After the rise in popularity of the smartphone and mobile app development, businesses started to shift from browser-based software to mobile platforms. There are multiple reasons that any company would want to reach out in the mobile environment, including attracting new customers, creating a better experience, expanding their brand, being more accessible, and overall growth. Developers started to build new platforms that would make it easy for not only their own company but anyone else to develop new applications at a faster pace. Today there are three different ways to create a mobile application: a native app, a hybrid app, and a web app. At DriveTime, we spent time researching and developing possible options for how we could make a mobile application to expand our user involvement. Our conclusion was to use a hybrid application that would incorporate our already existing web app and relaunch it as a native app. I took over this project for DriveTime and planned to implement two new features for their mobile application. Using Apache Cordova, I dived into the Software Development Life Cycle to create and deploy a Rate and Review feature and Push Notification functionality. In the end, I was only able to implement the Rate and Review feature due to some unexpected delays in development. I assumed all roles of a standard Agile development team to understand all of the different aspects that go into planning, creating, and publishing software.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132888-Thumbnail Image.png

Design and Simulation of Controllers for Multi-Robot Transport over Inclines

Description

The goal of this thesis is designing controllers for swarm robots transport a payload over inclines. Several fields of study are related to this study, including control theory, dynamic modeling

The goal of this thesis is designing controllers for swarm robots transport a payload over inclines. Several fields of study are related to this study, including control theory, dynamic modeling and programming. MATLAB, a tool of design controller and simulation, is used in this thesis.

To achieve this goal, a model of swarm robots transportation should be designed, which is cruise control for this scenario. Secondly, based on free body diagram, force equilibrium equation can be deduced. Then, the function of plant can be deduced based on cruise control and force equilibrium equations. Thirdly, list potential controllers, which may implement desired controls of swarm robots, and test their performance. Modify value of gains and do simulations of these controller. After analyzing results of simulation, the best controller can be selected.

In the last section, there is conclusion of entire thesis project and pointing out future work. The section of future work will mention potential difficulties of building entire control system, which allow swarm robots transport over inclines in real environment.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

132693-Thumbnail Image.png

#MeToo: Polarization and Discourse in the Digital Age

Description

Social media is explosively popular in discussing socio-political issues. This work provides a preliminary study on how polarization occurs online. Chapter I begins by introducing limitations of the internet in

Social media is explosively popular in discussing socio-political issues. This work provides a preliminary study on how polarization occurs online. Chapter I begins by introducing limitations of the internet in maintaining a free flow of information. Not only do users seek out groups of like-minded individuals and insulate themselves from opposing views, social media platforms algorithmically curate content such that it will be in line with a user’s preconceived notions of the world. The work then defines polarization and carefully discusses its most prominent causes. It then shifts focus to analyze a closely-related issue regarding political discourse: outrage, which is both a noticeable effect of and further cause of polarization. It is clearly prevalent in traditional media, but for completion, I provide a case study to measure its incidence in social media. In Chapter II, I scrutinize the language used in the #MeToo movement on Twitter and draw conclusions about the issues Twitter users focus on and how they express their views. This chapter details the method I used, the challenges I faced in designing the exploratory study, and the results I found. I benchmark patterns I find in the Twitterverse against those I find in The Wall Street Journal. The analysis relies upon the metric of word similarity, based on proximity of and frequency of words used together, to make distinctions about what users are most commonly saying with respect to given topics, or keywords. Chapter III closes the essay with conclusions of socio-political polarization, discourse, and outrage in social media. Finally, the essay outlines potential channels for future work.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

134486-Thumbnail Image.png

Development of an Educational Video Game

Description

The objective of this creative project was to gain experience in digital modeling, animation, coding, shader development and implementation, model integration techniques, and application of gaming principles and design through

The objective of this creative project was to gain experience in digital modeling, animation, coding, shader development and implementation, model integration techniques, and application of gaming principles and design through developing a professional educational game. The team collaborated with Glendale Community College (GCC) to produce an interactive product intended to supplement educational instructions regarding nutrition. The educational game developed, "Nutribots" features the player acting as a nutrition based nanobot sent to the small intestine to help the body. Throughout the game the player will be asked nutrition based questions to test their knowledge of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. If the player is unable to answer the question, they must use game mechanics to progress and receive the information as a reward. The level is completed as soon as the question is answered correctly. If the player answers the questions incorrectly twenty times within the entirety of the game, the team loses faith in the player, and the player must reset from title screen. This is to limit guessing and to make sure the player retains the information through repetition once it is demonstrated that they do not know the answers. The team was split into two different groups for the development of this game. The first part of the team developed models, animations, and textures using Autodesk Maya 2016 and Marvelous Designer. The second part of the team developed code and shaders, and implemented products from the first team using Unity and Visual Studio. Once a prototype of the game was developed, it was show-cased amongst peers to gain feedback. Upon receiving feedback, the team implemented the desired changes accordingly. Development for this project began on November 2015 and ended on April 2017. Special thanks to Laura Avila Department Chair and Jennifer Nolz from Glendale Community College Technology and Consumer Sciences, Food and Nutrition Department.

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

134492-Thumbnail Image.png

Eating Smart: Getting the Most Amount of Food

Description

Cravingz is a web-based application that allows users to learn the maximum number of food items that they can purchase at a restaurant within a defined personal budget. We created

Cravingz is a web-based application that allows users to learn the maximum number of food items that they can purchase at a restaurant within a defined personal budget. We created two versions of this web-based application and asked 40 users to perform an A/B test to determine which version provides the best user experience in terms of efficiency and performance. Users who participated in this study completed a set of tasks to test these applications. Our findings demonstrate that users prefer a web application that does not require them to input data repeatedly to view combinations for multiple restaurants. Although the version which required reentry of data was more visually-pleasing, users preferred the version in which inputting data was a one-time task.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

133944-Thumbnail Image.png

Imagining Climate: Combining Climate Awareness and Imagination

Description

Imagining Climate (www.imaginingclimate.com) is a social media project that gauges how the public thinks about climate change in their community. Users will view climate data from 2017, view projected

Imagining Climate (www.imaginingclimate.com) is a social media project that gauges how the public thinks about climate change in their community. Users will view climate data from 2017, view projected data for 2050, and then be given a prompt to imagine what the future looks like to them and write a short narrative story about their vision. Imagining Climate hopes to provide a public source of data for all and use imaginative writing to help users understand how other members of their communities think about climate change.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05