Matching Items (28)

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The Queer New Woman Portrait

Description

Shifting gender roles and deviations from societal norms are exemplified in portraits created by queer women artists active during the early twentieth century. A transformative period for women, the beginning of the twentieth century brought the concept of the New

Shifting gender roles and deviations from societal norms are exemplified in portraits created by queer women artists active during the early twentieth century. A transformative period for women, the beginning of the twentieth century brought the concept of the New Woman to the fore and provided opportunities for independence and self-expression for women. The New Woman is a term from the late nineteenth century, referring to women who were less interested in marriage and raising families and more interested in access to jobs and education. Through self-portraits and portraits of women in their circles, artists represented gender expression including androgyny and performative cross-dressing as declarations of queer women’s identity. This thesis focuses on works by the painters Romaine Brooks, Gluck, Florine Stettheimer, and photographers Berenice Abbott, Alice Austen, Marie Høeg and Bolette Berg. The artists socialized in queer circles and fostered new styles and forms of gender representation. In my study I explore how each artist approached her portraits, what each was trying to convey, and how their work aligns or diverges from the queer New Woman ideal. Their identities and shared experiences, both as queer women and artists, shaped their practice.
In addition, the artists’ sexualities are reflected in their pieces through their representation of their bodies. Often, this requires the interpretation of subtle visual clues and crucial images of androgyny, cross-dressing, and the dandy aesthetic. Queer artists often embraced clothing and accessories to express their identity and signal to others adept at recognizing such identifiers that they are queer. The painter Gluck exemplifies how androgynous clothing can be used as a statement of her sexuality in self-portraits as visual signifiers to those in queer circles. Through salons held in their homes, or a hidden back room of their studio in the case of Marie Høeg and Bolette Berg, artists created communities to inspire each other’s achievements and unique styles. In this paper I intend to shed light on how the portraits I am explicating are declarations of queerness, and how they present the artists’ deviations from gender norms to the art world and broader society.

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2020-05

Authenticating Art: The Process, Valuation, and Importance of Artworks

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The overall purpose of this creative project was to explore the implications of art authentication as it relates to the process, valuation, and importance of artworks. The project was presented in the form of a podcast as this type of

The overall purpose of this creative project was to explore the implications of art authentication as it relates to the process, valuation, and importance of artworks. The project was presented in the form of a podcast as this type of content is increasingly becoming popularized as a form of strategy in the field of marketing. As content is becoming a new way of experession in this digitial world, it is a new form of art. Because of this, podacasts, as a form of content, nicely reflects a similar manner of expression in modern day as art has for years. The examination, in question, began with the recently authenticated and auctioned Leonardo da Vinci artworks, The Isleworth Mona Lisa and The Salvador Mundi. These works brought on questions regarding the history of forgery, the process of authentication, appraisal, and overall ownership of art. These questions were researched and presented with regards to the works listed above as well as other high-profile examples in order to discuss their insinuations on the modern art market. Overall, properly authenticated work can make an impact on multiple facets of the market which may grant much attention to these situations. Interestingly, much of the processes that are related to art in modern day are quite subjective or unregulated. For example, authentication can be highly influenced by the opinion of experts. Valuation and appraisal are both similar in this sense, as well. Because of this, it is difficult to make any firm judgements concerning the works in question.

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Date Created
2019-05

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桜のバイキング: Exploring the Intersection of Medieval European and Japanese Culture Through Chainmail

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Since I was a child, I was active in the Society for Creative Anachronism, a medieval reenactment group. Through my involvement with the group, I developed an interest in medieval European history, and I had the opportunity to take several

Since I was a child, I was active in the Society for Creative Anachronism, a medieval reenactment group. Through my involvement with the group, I developed an interest in medieval European history, and I had the opportunity to take several jewelry making classes. I have been making jewelry for about seven years, and I especially love making chainmail jewelry, so I knew I wanted to incorporate that in this project. Rather than preparing a jewelry collection, I decided on a larger, more focused project – a period dress made of chainmail. I chose the Viking apron dress because it is a style that I myself have often worn in the SCA. To make the piece more personal to me, I incorporated influence from my Japanese heritage as well, both in the weave and in the cherry blossom theme of the dress. This project allowed me to explore the similarities and differences between Viking and Japanese culture, as well as to work with new metals and metalworking techniques that I had not worked with previously. For this project, I crafted an apron dress out of copper and nickel using the Hikaru weave, a variant of Japanese 6-in-1. I also sewed an underdress with simple chainmail trim and crafted a pair of cherry blossom shaped pins in place of the traditional tortoise brooches. This piece was a challenge to myself, as this was my first attempt at a project on this scale, and I had the opportunity to learn many new techniques along the way. While my finished piece has changed quite a bit from my original vision, I’ve learned so much from this project – about the cultures I tried to convey with the piece, as well as about myself and what I am capable of accomplishing.

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2019-05

The Interrelatedness of the Tarot and Hinduism: Communicating the Significance and Relevance of Tarot Archetypes with an Artistic Response through the Lens of Hindu Mythology

Description

The tarot is a means of communication with the world. It allows readers to interpret signs from their surroundings, gather information, and use this information to make inferences about a posed question. Its origins can be found in mid-15th century

The tarot is a means of communication with the world. It allows readers to interpret signs from their surroundings, gather information, and use this information to make inferences about a posed question. Its origins can be found in mid-15th century Europe as playing cards with four suits commonly used for gambling. Several hundred years later during the 18th century, it began to be used as a tool for divination; the Major Arcana, a set of 22 trump cards representing various archetypes, evolved as a supplement to a new tarot that has become associated with mysticism. The tarot’s foundation is based on archetypes that build society. It can serve as a visual lens to understand the experiences, thoughts, and actions of a person posing a question, allowing the reader to offer a solution by understanding and interpreting the specific visual language of a deck.
Hinduism is one of the oldest religions in the world and one of the most practiced today. It is full of fantastical myths and heroic legends, as well as undercurrents of feminism contrasted with misogyny and patriarchy. Hindu myths are contradictory as stories have evolved over time and have been retold with millions of differing perspectives.
In my thesis, I portrayed the 22 archetypes of the Major Arcana of the tarot through the lens of Hindu mythology as well as the broader pan-Indian culture. I include ancient stories and references to modern social issues. I visually communicated the connections between characters of Hindu mythology and the archetypes of the tarot with 22 watercolor paintings. This project was an opportunity to explore both the tarot through Hinduism, vice-versa. It allowed for the development of a deeper connection with spirituality and religion, along with a greater understanding of visual communication.

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Date Created
2019-05

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The Evolution of Art Conservation

Description

The field of art conservation has evolved parallel to scientific advancements and in response to changing social conditions. Methods have expanded from dusting the surface of a work to bombarding an image with x-rays in an effort to fulfill the

The field of art conservation has evolved parallel to scientific advancements and in response to changing social conditions. Methods have expanded from dusting the surface of a work to bombarding an image with x-rays in an effort to fulfill the ultimate goal of restoration: to return a piece of art to the state originally created by the artist. The process has become much easier and more complex with the introduction of analytical equipment that shifted the focus of the field away from maintenance towards academic study. This work illustrates the changes the field and demonstrates the application of scientific techniques to specific works.

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Date Created
2015-05

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Variety, Eternity: Victor Hugo's Relationship with Architecture

Description

Victor Hugo crafted a relationship with architecture that demonstrated his nuanced experience of the "harmony" of historical monuments, as exemplified in the novel Notre-Dame de Paris. In the first chapter, I will introduce the largest aspect of Notre-Dame de Paris'

Victor Hugo crafted a relationship with architecture that demonstrated his nuanced experience of the "harmony" of historical monuments, as exemplified in the novel Notre-Dame de Paris. In the first chapter, I will introduce the largest aspect of Notre-Dame de Paris' contradictory nature: its role as both historian and revolutionary. The Gothic's rise to prominence is traceable in Notre-Dame, and Hugo presented the edifice as proof of France's enduring cultural significance. Notre-Dame was just as influential in its revolutionary capacity: Hugo believed that the cathedral acted as an invigorating force to the medieval public and was a vital component of revolutions that took place in the sixteenth century. The second chapter deals with the juxtaposition between the cathedral's identity as a victim of human society and as a figure who engages in its own strategic defense. Hugo categorized several kinds of damage inflicted upon Notre-Dame, with the severity of each category depending upon its source: time, revolution, and shifting taste, which was by far the most egregious. Notre-Dame proves itself to be a formidable opponent in the novel, however, by confronting a violent mob with blows of its own; it also demonstrates the ability to psychically wound its enemies through the infernal hallucinations of Claude Frollo. The final contradiction explored in the third chapter is the nature of the cathedral's spirit. In the novel, Hugo personifies Notre-Dame, giving the structure individual relationships with human characters and the ability to nurture and influence Quasimodo in particular. The bell ringer is presented to the reader as a man reared by a cathedral, and Hugo's exploration of the particulars of their relationship composes a significant part of this chapter. Quasimodo experiences Notre-Dame as an ageless, self-perpetuating universe, and Hugo's juxtaposition of this relationship with that of Frollo emphasizes the author's reverent attitude towards the edifice and its ultimate transcendence of the culture that created it.

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2015-05

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Leonardo Da Vinci: Form and Function of the Heart

Description

Leonardo's anatomical studies of the heart demonstrate the dependency of form and function on one another and that their combined activity leads to a comprehensive understanding of the cardiovascular system. While Leonardo was able to make incredible deductions regarding the

Leonardo's anatomical studies of the heart demonstrate the dependency of form and function on one another and that their combined activity leads to a comprehensive understanding of the cardiovascular system. While Leonardo was able to make incredible deductions regarding the heart's anatomy and physiology through the concepts of form and function, it is evident that his preconceptions hindered him from realizing the full scope of his individual findings. In this paper, I will evaluate the perception of anatomy, the manner in which anatomical knowledge was acquired, and the resultant traditional understanding of the cardiovascular system during Leonardo's lifetime. Leonardo's drawings of the heart will then be analyzed to determine what conclusions he was able to make regarding the heart's anatomy and physiology. Finally, I will compare Leonardo's findings to the modern understanding of the cardiovascular system. Because Leonardo's anatomical studies were hidden from the world for so long, many of his conclusions regarding the heart did not come to light before other individuals had already begun to reach them on their own. Although he made incredible leaps in the understanding of the cardiovascular system, he made little contribution to modern cardiology. Now Leonardo's work can only be examined retrospectively to determine the accuracies and inaccuracies of Leonardo's conclusions in comparison to our modern understanding.

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2016-05

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The Art of Memory: Public Memorials

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Abstract The Art of Memory: Public Memorials Scarlett Olson In ancient times, memorials were constructed to commemorate victories in battle or to pay homage to kings and gods. Now, however, memorials focus more on the events of war and those

Abstract The Art of Memory: Public Memorials Scarlett Olson In ancient times, memorials were constructed to commemorate victories in battle or to pay homage to kings and gods. Now, however, memorials focus more on the events of war and those who died fighting for their country. They are spaces designed to create an atmosphere of quiet reflection to allow us to honor the dead and to serve as a reminder of the consequences of our actions. In this paper, I will analyze public memorials, specifically the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, using the concept of collective memory. The idea of collective memory was first formulated by Maurice Halbwachs in the early twentieth century, and it is at its core the belief that a group can share the same memories regarding specific events. The ideas and theories of collective memory, when applied to the analysis of memorial, can provide a new framework for exploring the form, content, effect, and affect of these structures. Collective memory can be manipulated by society and the creation of specific memorials is one very effective way to influence public opinion about certain historical events.

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2005-05

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Freewheelin': The American Counterculture in Museums

Description

Freewheelin': The American Counterculture in Museums is the first study to explore American museums that collect artifacts from the counterculture era at length. Examining institutions whose specialized collections and histories represent the recent, dynamic social movements of the mid-twentieth century

Freewheelin': The American Counterculture in Museums is the first study to explore American museums that collect artifacts from the counterculture era at length. Examining institutions whose specialized collections and histories represent the recent, dynamic social movements of the mid-twentieth century begets particular institutional challenges and extraordinary opportunities; both factors causing the evolution of some American history museums into premier social history centers. I have focused on four institutions for research: the Beat Museum, the GLBT History Museum, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and the Museum of Sex. The analysis of each organization contains a brief account of the history they strive to preserve, a case study of their professional operations, and objective recommendations. Ultimately through researching the four selected institutions and museum studies at large, it was determined that certain collective features are propelling a paradigm shift in modern American history museums.

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2012-12

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The Political Implications of Jacques-Louis David’s Paintings Oath of the Horatii and The Lictors Bringing to Brutus the Bodies of His Sons

Description

This thesis is concerned with the political implications of two of Jacques-Louis David's paintings: Oath of the Horatii (1784) and The Lictors Bringing to Brutus the Bodies of His Sons (1789). In this thesis, I argue that David’s pre-Revolutionary work

This thesis is concerned with the political implications of two of Jacques-Louis David's paintings: Oath of the Horatii (1784) and The Lictors Bringing to Brutus the Bodies of His Sons (1789). In this thesis, I argue that David’s pre-Revolutionary work contained political anticipations of Revolutionary France articulated in his Neoclassical forms, the classical stories he chose to paint, his own narrative innovations using light, color, gender, unusual scenes and the thematic conflict of the state vs the individual and family.

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2021-05