Matching Items (30)

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The Making of a Treehouse

Description

In this creative project, a treehouse is designed for a cottonwood tree in Dolores, Colorado. The treehouse design was rooted in engineering principles, and brought to life with using the commercial civil engineering program Risa-3D.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-12

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Analyzing Potential Solutions for Traffic Congestion on the Intersection of Forest and 89A in Sedona, AZ using Traffic Modeling Softwares

Description

Gathering the necessary information required to tackle traffic congestion problems is generally time consuming and challenging but is an important part of city planners’ work. The purpose of this paper

Gathering the necessary information required to tackle traffic congestion problems is generally time consuming and challenging but is an important part of city planners’ work. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology used when analyzing potential solutions for the Arizona State Route 89A and Highway 179 roundabout in Sedona, Arizona; which is currently experiencing significant congestion. The oversaturated condition is typically applied to signalized intersections but its application to roundabouts requires further exploration for future management of similar transportation systems. The accompanying Quick Estimation and Simulation model (QESM) spreadsheet was calibrated using an iterative process to optimize its level of adaptability to various scenarios. This microsimulation modeling program can be used to predict the outcome of possible roadway improvements aimed at decreasing traffic congestion. The information provided in this paper helps users understand traffic system problems, as a primary to visual simulation programs.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Structural Design: Shipping Container Coffee Shop

Description

This Barrett creative project includes the structural design of a coffee shop using recycled shipping containers in Phoenix, Arizona. Repurposing old shipping containers into commercial and residential buildings has become

This Barrett creative project includes the structural design of a coffee shop using recycled shipping containers in Phoenix, Arizona. Repurposing old shipping containers into commercial and residential buildings has become more popular. Even here in Arizona, buildings have already integrated shipping containers into their design. Shipping containers add a unique character to the architectural design of the building and at the same time cut costs of construction due to their low prices. With using the shipping containers as building materials, there is a positive impact on the use of the structures in builds. The uniqueness of using shipping containers is what sparked my interest to design a shipping container coffee shop. For my creative project, I designed the coffee shop using the already structurally sound core of the shipping container to my advantage. However, when adding modifications to the structure, the materials of the structure were analyzed to ensure the design could take the modifications. I have taken my love for structural design, the environment, and coffee and brought it to life. Through this project, I have a better understanding of how much thought goes into designing a building and have a deeper understanding of the codes that structural engineers must follow to design and analyze buildings.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

Bella Vida Estates: Due Diligence, Street Improvements, and Quantities

Description

This honors project combines the capstone component of CEE: 486 Integrated Civil Engineering Design and the Barrett, The Honors College requirement by combination of Due Diligence report and Street Improvements

This honors project combines the capstone component of CEE: 486 Integrated Civil Engineering Design and the Barrett, The Honors College requirement by combination of Due Diligence report and Street Improvements and Quantities, respectively.

Overall, this project report provides due diligence for a proposed development project, Bella Vida Estates, designed by Red Rock Engineering. This proposed project is located in the southwest portion of the City of Phoenix, in the Laveen Village community.

Bella Vida Estates is a proposed 560-acre mixed-use development whose composition includes single family residential, commercial, recreational park and greenspace, a preparatory charter school, and water storage and wastewater treatment facilities. The subject property is confined east of the new Loop 202 – South Mountain Freeway Extension, south of W. Dobbins Road, north of W. Elliot Road, and west of S. 51st Avenue.

The Due Diligence report is comprised of relevant information needed to develop these parcels of land, including a Property Overview, Land Development Plan, Development Considerations, Sustainability and Value Add components, and Costs.

To provide a more comprehensive due diligence package for the proposed project, street improvement quantities were estimated and then presented via a Construction Documents Exhibit and an Opinion of Probable Costs document.

The Construction Documents Exhibit was created according to City of Phoenix Standards using AutoCAD Civil 3D. The exhibit includes four sheets: Cover Sheet, Exhibit Sheet, Cross Sections, and Appendix. The purpose of this exhibit is to provide a visual representation of the streets to be improved upon, with proper hatching (based on type of cross section), dimensioning, and annotations to aid in presentation.

The Opinion of Probable Costs tabulates Onsite Development costs, which includes Paving, utilities in the form of Water, Sewer, and Storm, Earthwork/Grading, and Lump Sum costs. In addition to the onsite costs, Contingency, General Conditions, General Contractor Fee, and Taxes are included to provide a comprehensive overview of estimated costs.

Red Rock Engineering is excited to propose this promising, sustainable development as a place of residence, commerce, and recreation to the residents of the Laveen Village community.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Impacts of new crop portfolios on water consumption in Maricopa County

Description

Agriculture is the second largest water consumer in the Phoenix Metropolitan region, after the municipal sector. A significant portion of the cultivated land and agricultural water demand is from the

Agriculture is the second largest water consumer in the Phoenix Metropolitan region, after the municipal sector. A significant portion of the cultivated land and agricultural water demand is from the production of animal feed, including alfalfa (~69% of total cropland area), corn (~8), and sorghum (-3%), which are both exported and needed to support local dairy industry. The goal of this thesis is to evaluate the impacts on water demand and crop production of four different crop portfolios using alfalfa, corn, sorghum, and feed barley. For this aim, the Water Evaluation And Planning (WEAP) platform and the embedded MABIA agronomic module are applied to the Phoenix Active Management Area (AMA), a political/hydrological region including most of Phoenix Metro. The simulations indicate that the most efficient solution is a portfolio where all study crop production is made up by sorghum, with an increase of 153% in crop yield and a reduction of 60% of water consumption compared to current conditions. In contrast, a portfolio where all study crop production is made up by alfalfa, which is primary crop grown in current conditions, decreased crop yield by 77% and increases water demand by 105%. Solutions where all study crop production is achieved with corn or feed barley lead to a reduction of 77% and 65% of each respective water demand, with a portfolio of all corn for study crop production increasing crop yield by 245% and a portfolio of all feed barley for study crop production reducing crop yield by 29%.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Physical Aids for the Mechanics Project

Description

As a student and then an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant (UGTA), I have had the opportunity to personally witness the learning process of both myself and approximately 75 additional incoming Civil

As a student and then an Undergraduate Teaching Assistant (UGTA), I have had the opportunity to personally witness the learning process of both myself and approximately 75 additional incoming Civil Engineering students taking the Mechanics courses after me. While watching the student learning process as an UGTA, I realized that there were consistent points of confusion amongst the students that the teaching staff could not efficiently communicate with the electronic or physical classroom materials available. As a physical learner, I am able to learn more comprehensively if I have a physical model to manipulate, and often found myself in the position of wanting to be able to physically represent and manipulate the systems being studied in class.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Microbially Induced Desaturation and Precipitation (MIDP) Pressure Contours

Description

This thesis is part of a larger research project, conducted by Elizabeth Stallings Young, which aims to improve understanding about the factors controlling the process of MIDP and the interaction

This thesis is part of a larger research project, conducted by Elizabeth Stallings Young, which aims to improve understanding about the factors controlling the process of MIDP and the interaction between the biochemical reactions and the hydrological properties of soils treated with MIDP. Microbially Induced Desaturation and Precipitation (MIDP) is a bio-geotechnical process by which biogenic gas production and calcite mineral bio-cementation are induced in the pore space between the soil particles, which can mitigate earthquake induced liquefaction (Kavazanjian et al. 2015). In this process substrates are injected which stimulate indigenous nitrate reducing bacteria to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, while precipitating calcium carbonate minerals. The biogenic gas production has been shown to dampen pore pressure build up under dynamic loading conditions and significantly increase liquefaction resistance (Okamura and Soga 2006), while the precipitation of calcium carbonate minerals cements adjacent granular particles together. The objective of this thesis was to analyze the recorded pore pressure development as a result of biogenic gas formation and migration, over the entire two-dimensional flow field, by generating dynamic pressure contour plots, using MATLAB and ImageJ software. The experiment was run in a mesoscale tank that was approximately 114 cm tall, 114 cm wide and 5.25 cm thick. Substrate was flushed through the soil body and the denitrifying reaction occurred, producing gas and correspondingly, pressure. The pressure across the tank was recorded with pore pressure sensors and was loaded into a datalogger. This time sensitive data file was loaded into a MATLAB script, MIDPCountourGen.m, to create pressure contours for the tank. The results from this thesis include the creation of MIDPContourGen.m and a corresponding How-To Guide and pore pressure contours for the F60 tank. This thesis concluded that the MIDP reaction takes a relatively short amount of time and that the residual pressure in the tank after the water flush on day 17 offers a proof of effect of the MIDP reaction.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Effect of Drought Policies on Los Angeles Water Demand

Description

From 2007 to 2017, the state of California experienced two major droughts that required significant governmental action to decrease urban water demand. The purpose of this project is to isolate

From 2007 to 2017, the state of California experienced two major droughts that required significant governmental action to decrease urban water demand. The purpose of this project is to isolate and explore the effects of these policy changes on water use during and after these droughts, and to see how these policies interact with hydroclimatic variability. As explanatory variables in multiple linear regression (MLR) models, water use policies were found to be significant at both the zip code and city levels. Policies that specifically target behavioral changes were significant mathematical drivers of water use in city-level models. Policy data was aggregated into a timeline and coded based on categories including user type, whether the policy was voluntary or mandatory, the targeted water use type, and whether the change in question concerns active or passive conservation. The analyzed policies include but are not limited to state drought declarations, regulatory municipal ordinances, and incentive programs for household appliances. Spatial averages of available hydroclimatic data have been computed and validated using inverse distance weighting methods. The data was aggregated at the zip code level to be comparable to the available water use data for use in MLR models. Factors already known to affect water use, such as temperature, precipitation, income, and water stress, were brought into the MLR models as explanatory variables. After controlling for these factors, the timeline policies were brought into the model as coded variables to test their effect on water demand during the years 2000-2017. Clearly identifying which policy traits are effective will inform future policymaking in cities aiming to conserve water. The findings suggest that drought-related policies impact per capita urban water use. The results of the city level MLR models indicate that implementation of mandatory policies that target water use behaviors effectively reduce water use. Temperature, income, unemployment, and the WaSSI were also observed to be mathematical drivers of water use. Interaction effects between policies and the WaSSI were statistically significant at both model scales.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-12

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Ahwatukee Foothills Village Final Residential Structural Report

Description

This project report contains the design of a low-cost structural model of a residential structure in the City of Phoenix, AZ. The structural unit will be part of a residential

This project report contains the design of a low-cost structural model of a residential structure in the City of Phoenix, AZ. The structural unit will be part of a residential area in Ahwatukee Foothills Village located just south of South Mountain. The residential structure is 3600 square feet and consists of three bedrooms (including the master bedroom), two bathrooms (including the master bathroom), a 2-car garage, laundry room, kitchen, dining room, and a living room. There are two elevation options (A & B) for the roof framing plan. Elevation A includes a straight forward truss package consisting of two truss designs with no hip or girder trusses. Elevation B includes a more complex truss package which includes girder trusses, hip trusses, and corner jacks. Within both elevations, the trusses run perpendicular to the ridge of the structure as displayed in the Architectural Floor Plan (see Figure 4) with the exception of the hip trusses and corner jacks in Elevation B.

The design objective is to meet all safety specifications while minimizing the total cost of members and member connections. The design also aims to streamline the construction time and resources by using standard member cross section dimensions. This residential building report is carried out in accordance with the City of Phoenix standards and follows the ASCE7-10 code for the dead and live load combinations and wind pressures. This report also references the National Design Specifications (NDS) 2005 for the column design. HT Consulting Group is excited to create a safe and sustainable development for the residents within Ahwatukee Foothills Village.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

Engineering – The Social Experiment: An Analysis of Engineering Curriculum and Industry Expectations

Description

The engineers of the future are currently in the process of earning their degrees and certifications from engineering programs guided by ABET accreditations. ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and

The engineers of the future are currently in the process of earning their degrees and certifications from engineering programs guided by ABET accreditations. ABET, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, is the voice of reason for the development of engineering programs. Aspiring engineers desire institutions that follow ABET Standards to ensure that their education meets the expectations of industry partners and researchers. However, these standards have not been drastically altered in years to reflect the changing needs of industry. With the advancement of technology in the last two decades, old school engineering and its application is becoming less common.

Science policy and curriculum go hand in. The future engineers are taught hand calculations, lab testing for field work parallels, and methodologies based on the written policies set forth decades ago. Technology today is rapidly changing, and engineering education is struggling to make changes to keep up with these technology advancements. In today’s world, technology drives invention and innovation, whereas some argue it is thought and curiosity. Engineering programs are taking a toll regardless of the point of view. Education is not made to keep up with current societal needs.

This paper a provides an overview of the history of engineering, curriculum standards for engineering programs, an analysis of engineering programs at top universities and large universities alongside student experiences available to engineers. The ideas offered are no means the exact solution; rather policymakers and STEM education stakeholder may find the ideas shared helpful and use them as a catalyst for change.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-12