Matching Items (4)

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The influence of dome size, parent vessel angle, and coil packing density on coil embolization treatment in cerebral aneurysms

Description

A cerebral aneurysm is a bulging of a blood vessel in the brain. Aneurysmal rupture affects 25,000 people each year and is associated with a 45% mortality rate. Therefore, it is critically important to treat cerebral aneurysms effectively before they

A cerebral aneurysm is a bulging of a blood vessel in the brain. Aneurysmal rupture affects 25,000 people each year and is associated with a 45% mortality rate. Therefore, it is critically important to treat cerebral aneurysms effectively before they rupture. Endovascular coiling is the most effective treatment for cerebral aneurysms. During coiling process, series of metallic coils are deployed into the aneurysmal sack with the intent of reaching a sufficient packing density (PD). Coils packing can facilitate thrombus formation and help seal off the aneurysm from circulation over time. While coiling is effective, high rates of treatment failure have been associated with basilar tip aneurysms (BTAs). Treatment failure may be related to geometrical features of the aneurysm. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of dome size, parent vessel (PV) angle, and PD on post-treatment aneurysmal hemodynamics using both computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Flows in four idealized BTA models with a combination of dome sizes and two different PV angles were simulated using CFD and then validated against PIV data. Percent reductions in post-treatment aneurysmal velocity and cross-neck (CN) flow as well as percent coverage of low wall shear stress (WSS) area were analyzed. In all models, aneurysmal velocity and CN flow decreased after coiling, while low WSS area increased. However, with increasing PD, further reductions were observed in aneurysmal velocity and CN flow, but minimal changes were observed in low WSS area. Overall, coil PD had the greatest impact while dome size has greater impact than PV angle on aneurysmal hemodynamics. These findings lead to a conclusion that combinations of treatment goals and geometric factor may play key roles in coil embolization treatment outcomes, and support that different treatment timing may be a critical factor in treatment optimization.

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Date Created
2013

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The effects of endovascular treatment parameters on cerebral aneurysm hemodynamics

Description

A cerebral aneurysm is an abnormal ballooning of the blood vessel wall in the brain that occurs in approximately 6% of the general population. When a cerebral aneurysm ruptures, the subsequent damage is lethal damage in nearly 50% of cases.

A cerebral aneurysm is an abnormal ballooning of the blood vessel wall in the brain that occurs in approximately 6% of the general population. When a cerebral aneurysm ruptures, the subsequent damage is lethal damage in nearly 50% of cases. Over the past decade, endovascular treatment has emerged as an effective treatment option for cerebral aneurysms that is far less invasive than conventional surgical options. Nonetheless, the rate of successful treatment is as low as 50% for certain types of aneurysms. Treatment success has been correlated with favorable post-treatment hemodynamics. However, current understanding of the effects of endovascular treatment parameters on post-treatment hemodynamics is limited. This limitation is due in part to current challenges in in vivo flow measurement techniques. Improved understanding of post-treatment hemodynamics can lead to more effective treatments. However, the effects of treatment on hemodynamics may be patient-specific and thus, accurate tools that can predict hemodynamics on a case by case basis are also required for improving outcomes.Accordingly, the main objectives of this work were 1) to develop computational tools for predicting post-treatment hemodynamics and 2) to build a foundation of understanding on the effects of controllable treatment parameters on cerebral aneurysm hemodynamics. Experimental flow measurement techniques, using particle image velocimetry, were first developed for acquiring flow data in cerebral aneurysm models treated with an endovascular device. The experimental data were then used to guide the development of novel computational tools, which consider the physical properties, design specifications, and deployment mechanics of endovascular devices to simulate post-treatment hemodynamics. The effects of different endovascular treatment parameters on cerebral aneurysm hemodynamics were then characterized under controlled conditions. Lastly, application of the computational tools for interventional planning was demonstrated through the evaluation of two patient cases.

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Date Created
2013

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Characterization of the effects of cerebral aneurysm geometry on hemodynamics and endovascular treatment outcomes

Description

Cerebral aneurysms are pathological balloonings of blood vessels in the brain, commonly found in the arterial network at the base of the brain. Cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to a dangerous medical condition, subarachnoid hemorrhage, that is associated with high

Cerebral aneurysms are pathological balloonings of blood vessels in the brain, commonly found in the arterial network at the base of the brain. Cerebral aneurysm rupture can lead to a dangerous medical condition, subarachnoid hemorrhage, that is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Effective evaluation and management of cerebral aneurysms is therefore essential to public health. The goal of treating an aneurysm is to isolate the aneurysm from its surrounding circulation, thereby preventing further growth and rupture. Endovascular treatment for cerebral aneurysms has gained popularity over traditional surgical techniques due to its minimally invasive nature and shorter associated recovery time. The hemodynamic modifications that the treatment effects can promote thrombus formation within the aneurysm leading to eventual isolation. However, different treatment devices can effect very different hemodynamic outcomes in aneurysms with different geometries.

Currently, cerebral aneurysm risk evaluation and treatment planning in clinical practice is largely based on geometric features of the aneurysm including the dome size, dome-to-neck ratio, and parent vessel geometry. Hemodynamics, on the other hand, although known to be deeply involved in cerebral aneurysm initiation and progression, are considered to a lesser degree. Previous work in the field of biofluid mechanics has demonstrated that geometry is a driving factor behind aneurysmal hemodynamics.

The goal of this research is to develop a more combined geometric/hemodynamic basis for informing clinical decisions. Geometric main effects were analyzed to quantify contributions made by geometric factors that describe cerebral aneurysms (i.e., dome size, dome-to-neck ratio, and inflow angle) to clinically relevant hemodynamic responses (i.e., wall shear stress, root mean square velocity magnitude and cross-neck flow). Computational templates of idealized bifurcation and sidewall aneurysms were created to satisfy a two-level full factorial design, and examined using computational fluid dynamics. A subset of the computational bifurcation templates was also translated into physical models for experimental validation using particle image velocimetry. The effects of geometry on treatment were analyzed by virtually treating the aneurysm templates with endovascular devices. The statistical relationships between geometry, treatment, and flow that emerged have the potential to play a valuable role in clinical practice.

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Date Created
2016

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A Heterogeneous Porous Media Model for Fluid Flow Simulation

Description

Owing to the surge in development of endovascular devices such as coils and flow diverter stents, doctors are inclined to approach surgical cases non-invasively more often than before. Treating brain aneurysms as a bulging of a weakened area of a

Owing to the surge in development of endovascular devices such as coils and flow diverter stents, doctors are inclined to approach surgical cases non-invasively more often than before. Treating brain aneurysms as a bulging of a weakened area of a blood vessel is no exception. Therefore, promoting techniques that can help surgeons have a better idea of treatment outcomes are of invaluable importance.

In order to investigate the effects of these devices on intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics, the conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach uses the explicit geometry of the device within an aneurysm and discretizes the fluid domain to solve the Navier-Stokes equations. However, since the devices are made of small struts, the number of mesh elements in the boundary layer region would be considerable. This cumbersome task led to the implementation of the porous medium assumption. In this approach, the explicit geometry of the device is eliminated, and relevant porous medium assumptions are applied. Unfortunately, as it will be shown in this research, some of the porous medium approaches used in the literature are over-simplified. For example, considering the porous domain to be homogeneous is one major drawback which leads to significant errors in capturing the intra-aneurysmal flow features. Specifically, since the devices must comply with the complex geometry of an aneurysm, the homogeneity assumption is not valid.

In this research, a novel heterogeneous porous medium approach is introduced. This results in a substantial reduction in the total number of mesh elements required to discretize the flow domain while not sacrificing the accuracy of the method by over-simplifying the utilized assumptions.

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Date Created
2018