Matching Items (22)

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An Evidence-Based Resource for Faculty Addressing Non-Course-Specific Student Needs

Description

The goal of this thesis was to create a resource addressing non-course-specific (NCS) student needs that College of Integrative Sciences and Arts (CISA) faculty can provide to their students when

The goal of this thesis was to create a resource addressing non-course-specific (NCS) student needs that College of Integrative Sciences and Arts (CISA) faculty can provide to their students when appropriate. Students attend faculty office hours for a variety of reasons, and not all are academic in nature. Data was collected in order to determine which resources were lacking in addressing these needs. Student need was identified through a 13-item survey regarding faculty perception of NCS student needs, including the primary reason for office hour visitation and the primary sources of stress, academic advising, and time management complaints from their students. Additionally, feedback was collected regarding faculty perception of available resources and likelihood of utilizing a new resource. Throughout the Downtown, Tempe, and Polytechnic campuses, 24 faculty responded. It was found that work stress, familial stress, academic advising requests, and students comments of being overwhelmed were the primary NCS student needs as perceived by faculty. Additionally, the majority of faculty reported not feeling fully equipped to address these needs. This information was used to create a resource compiling a list of University and off-campus tools that students can access to address these needs. The resource combined data from faculty and from the literature to address general and specific issues of stress, academic advising, feeling ‘off,’ and recovery and was created a double-sided handout to be used electronically or for print. It is currently available for faculty use. With further research, this resource could be expanded or refined to address the needs of a larger population of students in different colleges or on different campuses. Eventually, this could be used as a University-wide tool.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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How Narcissism Affects Collegiate Women's Soccer Using Face-Reading Software

Description

Many studies have supported the "epidemic" of increasing narcissism with the current generation. However, the importance of accurately measuring narcissism has never been greater. Studies have measured the reliability and

Many studies have supported the "epidemic" of increasing narcissism with the current generation. However, the importance of accurately measuring narcissism has never been greater. Studies have measured the reliability and feasibility of the narcissistic personality inventory (NPI) at reporting narcissism and the Noldus FaceReader technology at detecting basic emotions, but the validity of these two measurement tools working together needs to be further researched. This study investigated how reliable the Noldus FaceReader technology was at detecting basic emotions of participants while they performed the NPI personality quiz and if the emotions generated from the facial analysis software can accurately represent an individual's narcissistic characteristics. Specifically, the study explored how the narcissistic personality quiz and the newest version of Noldus FaceReader can be used to detect narcissistic individuals within a team environment. An intervention was conducted in which participants, 16 female collegiate soccer players, engaged in the fall soccer season. Narcissism scores were measured before and after the intervention and then analyzed in correlation with the emotions through the facial analysis software. Results from the study showed that the 40-question narcissistic personality quiz could be condensed into a 14-question quiz in order to truly detect narcissism by generating corresponding emotions. Results also showed that narcissism is most significantly and consistently correlated to the emotions of scared, angry, and disgusted.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Drug Courts: A Method to Reduce Recidivism

Description

The author examines drug court as a means to reduce recidivism rates for individuals who are addicted to illegal substances. The thesis analyzes the best practices for drug courts in

The author examines drug court as a means to reduce recidivism rates for individuals who are addicted to illegal substances. The thesis analyzes the best practices for drug courts in treating addiction and lowering recidivism. In conducting this analysis, the author focuses on the Yuma County Drug Court Program (YCDC). After discussing the major components of the YCDC program, the author reaches several conclusions about the program. The author's conclusions are based in part on a study analyzing the recidivism rates for individuals who participated in YCDC from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2010. The author concludes that an effective drug court program requires proper screening and assessment using validated assessment tools that ensure delivery of treatment to individuals with high substance abuse treatment needs. In addition, drug courts must include counseling in both sober individual and group settings, cognitive restructuring, life skills training, and frequent interaction with the drug court judge. The author also concludes that drug courts are more successful when they stress accountability and independence by requiring participants to maintain a stable residence and employment. In YCDC these practices lead to 48.4% of individuals participating in the 18-month program having no criminal justice involvement for a period of three years after their exit from the program. Other important outcomes showed that well over 90% of the participants' drug tests were negative and 87% of the participants were employed. The author concludes that the YCDC program provides a good model for drug courts seeking to lower recidivism.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Effects of Positive Affirmations on Depressive Symptoms among Female and Male Senior Barrett Honors Students

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine whether positive affirmations can lower depressive symptoms amongst male and female Arizona State University (ASU) honors students. Male and female ASU honors

The purpose of this study was to examine whether positive affirmations can lower depressive symptoms amongst male and female Arizona State University (ASU) honors students. Male and female ASU honors students (20-22 years of age; N=40) were recruited from Barrett, the Honors College, through email and online newsletters. Students who had been previously or were at the time diagnosed with clinical depression were not permitted to participate in the study. Only 9 female and 14 males completed the entire study. Participants completed a pre- and post- test that each consisting of reading aloud questions and their answers from the Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) while being video and audio recorded. Participants were given a list of 20 affirmations after the pre-test and were instructed to choose and read to themselves a new affirmation three times a day, 3 times a week for a total of 6 weeks. There was an average increase among all participants' BDI scores, but no significance was found in the improvement. Emotional responses were captured using the facial recognition software, Noldus FaceReader, and was used to observe whether there was emotional dissonance in the BDI answers. The correlation between the emotion "sad" and the answer chosen was found by using Pearson's r for each participants. There were only 2 total interviews that indicated a strong positive correlation and 1 interview that indicated strong negative correlation. All others were either moderate or minimal correlation, showing that the majority of participants' emotions may have not affected their answer choices. Results indicated there is no significant improvement when using affirmations to improve depressive symptoms and mood.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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Emotional Arousal of Children with Autism to Pixar Videos

Description

Internal and external emotion recognition is universal knowledge individuals begin to understand in early childhood. Children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have physiological impairments that affect their social functioning,

Internal and external emotion recognition is universal knowledge individuals begin to understand in early childhood. Children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have physiological impairments that affect their social functioning, behavior, and emotion regulation. They often have difficulty revealing true emotions as opposed to mimicked emotions, which can make social connections challenging. In this pilot study, children with high-functioning and low-functioning ASD were observed in their therapy clinic, KidzSPOT Therapy, while watching a four-minute Pixar™ video as pre and post measures. The children were their own control from pre to post-evaluation. The animated characters and situations shown in the Pixar™ videos throughout the study exhibited two specific emotions: happy and sad. For six-weeks at home, children and their caregivers were asked to watch two, four-minute PixarTM videos a week on non-consecutive days and were recorded with cellular devices. Noldus FaceReader™ was used to analyze and determine increased emotional arousal of the children from recordings sent by their caregivers as they watched the videos at home. The Circumplex Model of Affect from the Noldus FaceReader™ analysis exposed the children’s active and inactive responses. The children sought support from their caregivers and therapists as a form of validation and situational understanding. The data did not display evidence of significant correlation between variables and emotional change over the course of the study. There were many limitations to this pilot study resulting in inadequate conclusions for a whole subpopulation. These findings were limited to sample size, participant interest and age-range availability within the clinic.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

Ideal Weightlifting Volume and Frequency for the Male Lifter

Description

For my Honor’s Project for Barrett the Honors College, I chose to research and develop an
application on the topic of Ideal Weightlifting Volume and Frequency for The Male Lifter.

For my Honor’s Project for Barrett the Honors College, I chose to research and develop an
application on the topic of Ideal Weightlifting Volume and Frequency for The Male Lifter. The
reason I decided to center my project around this topic is due to the plethora of information
available on this subject matter. However, I was more driven to pursue this subject matter due to
the lack of implementation and usage of all the relevant information and case studies offered to
us through the means of online journals, abstracts, reports, etc.
The application will be programmed using the software known as Android Studio. Inside
Android Studio, the programming language that will be utilized is Java. The goal for this
application is to gather information from the user, and with that information, create a conducive
weekly weightlifting regiment based on the wants and needs of the user. Furthermore, the
application will only create programs on a week to week basis, thus encouraging the user to
dabble with different preferences each week. Outputting the program on a week-to-week basis is
an integral logic of this program because it is my belief that if the user is given the privilege to
change their programming on a weekly basis this will allow for flexibility, adaptability, and the
pursuance of short-term goals, which is much more tangible in the onslaught of obtaining a goal.
When browsing through the app store or the internet, it is incredibly difficult to find online
programs that utilize research and scientific credibility. Many of these programs and trainers
offer quick results that are flashy and trendy, however lack any real qualitative reinforcement.
Thus, it is my mission, with my application, to create a program that is intuitive for the user, as
well as to provide scientific programming with proper citation of case studies and reports
conducted by educated individuals.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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A feasibility study on the effectiveness of an 8-Week meditative movement intervention to initiate weight loss in female gastric bypass patients experiencing post-surgical weight gain

Description

While obesity rates have plateaued within the last decade,

two-thirds of the United States

population is currently classified as overweight (defined a

s a body mass index [BMI] of

25-29.9 kg/m²)

While obesity rates have plateaued within the last decade,

two-thirds of the United States

population is currently classified as overweight (defined a

s a body mass index [BMI] of

25-29.9 kg/m²) or obese (a BMI greater than 30 kg/m²). Bariatric

surgical interventions

are not only more effective than behavioral treatments

in the short term but are the only

form of obesity intervention with evidence of consisten

t long-term effectiveness.

However, even among bariatric surgery patients, weight

loss often stabilizes and it is

estimated that more than 20% of bariatric surgery patient

s will regain a significant

amount of weight that was initially lost long-term. Li

ttle research to date has been

conducted on physical activity in post bariatric surgery pati

ents. More specifically, there

have been no studies to date examining the effects of Me

ditative Movement (MM)

programs on body composition in bariatric patients. A s

tudy using an 8-week Tai Chi

Easy program was conducted in female gastric bypass patient

s to explore feasibility of

MM in the bariatric population as well as pre- and post-in

tervention changes in weight,

mindfulness, eating behaviors, body awareness, physical a

ctivity patterns, dietary quality

and mood. Data analysis revealed that there were no s

ignificant changes in weight or

physical activity patterns; however, significant changes w

ere observed in anxiety, overall

body awareness and cognitive restraint in eating. Addit

ionally, a significant decrease in

processed meat consumption and a weak trend towards increa

sed consumption of fruits

may suggest an overall improvement in dietary quality.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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The effects of assisted cycle therapy on executive and motor functioning in young adult females with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Description

Voluntary exercise has been shown to generate post exercise improvements in executive function within the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) population. Research is limited on the link between exercise and motor

Voluntary exercise has been shown to generate post exercise improvements in executive function within the attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) population. Research is limited on the link between exercise and motor function in this population. Whether or not changes in executive and motor function are observed under assisted exercise conditions is unknown. This study examined the effect of a six-week cycling intervention on executive and motor-function responses in young adult females with ADHD. Participants were randomized to either a voluntary exercise (VE) or an assisted exercise (AE) group. Both groups performed 30 minute cycling sessions, three times per week, at either a voluntary or assisted rate, on a modified Theracycle Model 200 motorized stationary cycle ergometer. The Mann-Whitney U tests were used to detect median differences between groups, and the Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to test median differences within groups. Executive function improvements were greater for AE compared to VE in activation (MDNAE = 162 vs. MDNVE = 308, U = .00, p = .076, ES = .79); planning (MDNAE = 51.0 vs. MDNAE = 40.5, U = .00, p = .083, ES = .77); attention (MDNAE = 13.0 vs. MDNVE = 10.0, U = .00, p = .083, ES = .77); and working memory (MDNAE = 10.0 vs. MDNVE = 6.5, U = .00, p = .076, ES = .79). Motor function improvements were greater for AE compared to VE in manual dexterity (MDNAE = 18 vs. MDNVE = 15.8, U = .00, p = .083, ES = .77); bimanual coordination (MDNAE = 28.0 vs. MDNVE = 25.3, U = .00, p = .083, ES = .77); and gross motor movements of the fingers, hands, and arms (MDNAE = 61.7 vs. MDNVE = 56.0, U = .00, p = .083, ES = .77). Deficits in executive and motor functioning have been linked to lifelong social and psychological impairments in individuals with ADHD. Finding ways to improve functioning in these areas is important for cognitive, emotional and social stability. Compared to VE, AE is a more effective strategy for improving executive and motor functioning in young adult females with ADHD.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Association between mindful eating and weight cycling in middle age women

Description

Introduction: Weight cycling is defined as happening when an individual intentionally loses weight and then subsequently regaining the weight over time. Weight cycling has been associated with a number

Introduction: Weight cycling is defined as happening when an individual intentionally loses weight and then subsequently regaining the weight over time. Weight cycling has been associated with a number of adverse health consequences and is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The large majority of behaviorally based weight loss interventions typically result in full weight regain often with additional weight gained over time with each repeated bout of weight cycling. Mindful eating, which is defined as a non-judgmental awareness of meal related factors, has been found to influence negative behaviors related to weight cycling. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between mindful eating and weight cycling in middle aged women.

Methods: This study used an observational design to explore the relationships and characterize responses to the Mindfulness Eating Questionnaire (MEQ) in 75 overweight women (BMI > 25) who self-reported a history of weight cycling using a weight cycling index (WCI). The participants were divided into three groups: non-cyclers (NC) less than three cycles of 10 lbs; moderate cyclers (MC) at least three weight cycles of 10lbs; and severe cyclers (SC) at least three weight cycles of at least 20lbs. Results: NC were significantly (p < 0.05) younger and had lower BMI than the MC and SC groups. There were no significant differences in any of the MEQ subscores based on WCI groups. There were no significant relationships between WCI and any of the MEQ subscores. Conclusion: The Mindful Eating Questionnaire (MEQ), was an insufficient discriminatory measure for use in an observational study on a complex behavior such as weight cycling. Further research to understand eating behavior domains, mindful awareness skills, and risk of weight cycling is needed.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016

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The Effects of Exposure to Body Positive and Fitspiration Instagram Content on Undergraduate Women’s State Body Satisfaction, State Body Appreciation, and Mood

Description

The promulgation of the thin-ideal is associated with bulimia, dieting, supplement use, negative affect, and body dissatisfaction. “Fitspiration” was created as an “antidote” to the thin-ideal through the promotion of

The promulgation of the thin-ideal is associated with bulimia, dieting, supplement use, negative affect, and body dissatisfaction. “Fitspiration” was created as an “antidote” to the thin-ideal through the promotion of healthy eating and exercise; however, research indicates Fitspiration continues to promote the thin-ideal with similarly detrimental outcomes. Recently, research has shifted from a focus on body disturbance to concepts of positive body image (Halliwell, 2015), often researched through the concept of body appreciation. While the research is limited, a few studies have shown increases in body appreciation and mood after viewing body positive images. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to experimentally examine the impact of exposure to body positive and Fitspiration Instagram images on the body satisfaction, body appreciation, and mood of undergraduate women. Participants were 98 female undergraduate students (18-29 years old) currently attending Arizona State University. Participants were randomly assigned to view Fitspiration, Body Positive, or appearance neutral Instagram images. Dependent variables of state body appreciation, state body dissatisfaction, and state mood were measured using Visual Analogue Scales. Trait thin-ideal internalization, trait social comparison, and body mass index (BMI) were included as covariates. Qualitative short-answer questions were included as an exploratory aim. A one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine group differences in post-test scores followed by post-hoc analyses using the Bonferroni correction when significant. After controlling for baseline score, trait thin-ideal internalization, trait social comparison, and BMI, post-test body appreciation scores within Fitspiration condition were significantly lower than the control (MD= 9.818, SE=3.743, p=.031) and Body Positive condition (MD=9.372, SE=3.492, p=0.26). After controlling for baseline score, trait thin-ideal internalization, trait social comparison, and BMI, the Body Positive condition demonstrated significantly higher post-test body satisfaction scores than the control (MD= 11.134, SE=3.093, p=.002) and Fitspiration condition (MD=17.312, SE=3.092, p=<.001). After controlling for baseline scores, mean post-test positive mood scores within the Fitspiration group were significantly lower than the Body Positive condition (MD=-0.378, SE=.135, p=.019). There were no differences in post-test negative mood across conditions. Findings suggest short-term exposure to body positive images may improve body appreciation, Body Positivity, and positive mood among undergraduate females.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020