Matching Items (6)

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An Overview of Sustainability in the Hotel Industry: How the World’s Largest Brands are Practicing Sustainability

Description

This study aims to identify the self-reported sustainability goals, practices, and results of the five largest hotel companies that are headquartered in the United States through a comprehensive content analysis

This study aims to identify the self-reported sustainability goals, practices, and results of the five largest hotel companies that are headquartered in the United States through a comprehensive content analysis of each of their websites. The five companies included in the study are Best Western International, Wyndham Hotels and Resorts, Choice Hotels International, Hilton Worldwide, and Marriott International. The main focus centered on the qualitative information they shared about their goals and implemented practices across the hotels owned and operated by each company. In addition, the published qualitative data was analyzed to look at the reported results of their implemented practices. The results showed a large variety in the level of information that was shared by each of the five companies.
Information was examined using thirteen indicators of sustainability. Eight indicators were chosen that represented environmental sustainability, plus five indicators that represent social and economic sustainability. Based on the information analyzed, each company received a score for each indicator according to the level of information disclosed. This created a sustainability scorecard, with Marriott and Hilton scoring the highest, Wyndham and Best Western scoring the lowest, and Choice Hotels falling in the middle .In summary, it was determined that Hilton is reporting at the highest level, based on the measured indicators in addition to receiving external assurance on their disclosed results from implemented practices, The other four companies have further steps they should take to better communicate their sustainable practices and overall commitment to sustainability.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Representation of the United Kingdom Pre- and Post- Referendum

Description

Limited researches have studied on the dissonance of the representations of a destination by using difference induced agents such as government, trade media tourism articles, and visual representations. This study

Limited researches have studied on the dissonance of the representations of a destination by using difference induced agents such as government, trade media tourism articles, and visual representations. This study examines the United Kingdom's image, and determines whether the dissonance exist pre- and post- referendum in the internal imagery of the United Kingdom and imagery portrayed aboard. Leading newspapers from the United States, United Kingdom, and Europe are analyzed to determine the predominant themes. Semi-structured interviews are conducted with the U.S. tour operators and Arizona's travel agents. Tour brochures and user-generated content on TripAdvisor are analyzed to study tourists' responses to Brexit. Skift is analyzed to project future growth in tourism industry. Results show that the leadings newspapers projects similar concerns negatively and positively pre- and post- referendum. Uncertainty in policy changes leads to other themes that are identified such as investment, employment, trade, independence, market growth, etc. It projects the international trade, domestic market growth and global market growth will be significantly impact by Brexit due to higher tariff and regulations on migrants in the United Kingdom. In contrast, travel brochures are marketing UK from heritage, historical attractions, and special events, but they do not reflect the influence of Brexit on how tour operators market UK pre- and post- referendum. Further data is conducted on the semi-structured interviews with travel agents across Arizona, but travel agents responded with Brexit has no influences on US tourists. Additional content analysis on VisitBritain/VisitEngland shows the growth in tourism industry by an increasing provided data collection on tourism performance that reflect there is an increasing departure rate of US tourists in UK after the referendum. User-generated content on TripAdvisor and Skift align with the identified themes in leading newspapers from US, UK, and Europe such as uncertainty in policy change. The present study further outlines preferable method to advance future studies on the destination image of U.K. during and after the Brexit.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-05

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The importance of streetscapes and servicescapes in tourist shopping villages: a case study of two Arizona communities

Description

Many communities that once relied on the extractive industries have since turned to tourism to find another source of income. These communities are primarily old mining towns. Since these towns

Many communities that once relied on the extractive industries have since turned to tourism to find another source of income. These communities are primarily old mining towns. Since these towns have started to reinvent themselves, they have become important places of study. Previous literature has found specific factors that are common in tourist shopping villages. Currently, there is not much research that has explored the affect the streetscape and servicescape have on visitor experiences. Existing research focuses on urban shopping settings such as shopping malls. This study interviewed employees and surveyed visitors in two suburban tourist shopping villages in Arizona. More specifically, it is aimed to explore how the streetscapes and servicescapes in tourist shopping villages influence visitors' overall experience, intent to return to the village, and their purchasing behavior. This study adds to the current literature on tourist shopping villages and the streetscapes and servicescapes as there is a limited amount of information available. To date, the majority of scholarly information available describes the factors of tourist shopping villages and does not attempt to identify their importance for tourists. This study may serve as a stepping platform for future research. The findings of this study offer important implications for destination marketing organizations, different stakeholders of tourism, and the policy makers. This study primarily focuses on the tourists' view of tourist shopping villages, and can offer insight into how to increase visitor spending.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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The economic viability of heritage festivals

Description

Many scholars agree that heritage tourism has grown in recent years. It has become a unique way for communities to diversify their economies while preserving local culture and heritage.

Many scholars agree that heritage tourism has grown in recent years. It has become a unique way for communities to diversify their economies while preserving local culture and heritage. One unique way communities are doing this is through heritage festivals. These festivals have a significant impact on local communities and are multifaceted as they do not just provide economic impact to host communities, but also positive or potentially negative social and environmental impacts.

In recent years, a more sustainable approach integrating economic, socio-cultural and environmental impacts has been suggested when analyzing short term event such as festivals. It is important for event managers and scholars alike to understand these potential impacts as heritage festivals continue to evolve and prevalent part of heritage tourism.

This study aims to measure and quantify the economic, social and environmental impacts of two heritage festivals – Gold Rush Days and Bluegrass Festival, closely following Andersson and Lundberg’s 2013 study on commensurability and sustainability utilizing willingness to pay (WTP) and willingness to accept (WTA). Both are annual heritage festivals and take place in Wickenburg, Arizona. Primary data collection methods are used to gather information regarding economic and social impacts. Paper questionnaires distributed via stratified random sample to festival attendees and town residents is the survey instrument used in the study. To determine environmental impacts, secondary data in the form of stakeholder interviews are conducted.

Findings suggest a positive economic impact to the town of Wickenburg. Visitor expenditures, retained local spending and direct, indirect, and induced impacts are presented. Social impacts show a generally positive attitude toward the festival from a resident perspective. Environmental impacts show that collaboration among town stakeholders is needed to better determine festival environmental impact as no formal measures of impact are currently being recorded. Further empirical research is needed to better determine these impacts.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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Production, transmission, and consumption of Red Tourism in China: a model of the circuit of red heritage and tourism

Description

Because of its ability to harbor social values, norms, and beliefs, heritage has always been utilized as an ideological vehicle. One prominent example of politicizing heritage is Chinese red tourism,

Because of its ability to harbor social values, norms, and beliefs, heritage has always been utilized as an ideological vehicle. One prominent example of politicizing heritage is Chinese red tourism, comprised of state-promoted tours to revolutionary memorial sites. It is expected to generate political, economic, and social benefits, particularly to reinforce the legitimate leadership of the Chinese Communist Party. Statistics show that dramatic market growth in red tourism has occurred over the past decade. Yet it is still heavily driven by the government and thus whether long-term sustainability can be achieved is still questionable.

This dissertation explores the dynamics of red tourism from the perspective of a meaning-making process, where tourism discourses circulate among the processes of production, transmission, and consumption. The results reveal that higher-level government primarily assumes the leading role, whereas local government is largely excluded from strategy making processes and primarily responsible for implementation and operation. Some dissonance exists between higher and lower-level governments in their goals and involvement in red tourism development. Second, intermediaries are not altruistic and attempt to maximize their own benefits. While site interpreters may provide officially authorized narratives, their primary focus is hosting higher-up administrative visitors. On the contrary, tour guides are more customer-oriented, which may lead to officially undesirable interpretations. Third, driven by multiple motives, tourists have increasingly diverse attitudes towards red heritage and participate in various political and non-political activities. A considerable degree of congruence was found between tourists' participation, motivation, memories, and perception. Quantitative results indicate that the majority of tourists have learned about the political significance and/or content of red heritage, and developed more positive attitudes towards, and support for, the CCP and the government, to a certain extent.

This dissertation contributes to current research by adopting a systematic and emic perspective to explore the dynamics of red tourism. Several conceptual frameworks were developed inductively to describe the meaning-making process. Mixed methods were used to learn about tourists' consumption and perceptions of red heritage. Implications regarding enhancing the effectiveness of the meaning-making process, limitations of the study, and potential directions for future research are also discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Co-Created Destination Branding for Creative MICE Tourism: Building Synergies with Cultural Heritage Assets

Description

This study develops a Creative MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conventions/conferences and Exhibitions) Tourism Destination Branding Model (CMDBM), and argues for co-creation and synergies between MICE and heritage resources in a popular

This study develops a Creative MICE (Meetings, Incentives, Conventions/conferences and Exhibitions) Tourism Destination Branding Model (CMDBM), and argues for co-creation and synergies between MICE and heritage resources in a popular business destination. MICE tourism can be enhanced through co-created offerings by adding innovative value to MICE tourism experiences. The proposed CMDBM framework aims to help determine how a destination can develop a co-created MICE brand through collaboration with key stakeholders to better meet potential MICE travelers’ other touristic interests and cultural values.

The research project was undertaken in collaboration with the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), New Orleans Ernest N. Morial Convention Center, and several heritage institutions in New Orleans. The study adopts both qualitative and quantitative research designs to explore the destination brand strategy. The qualitative data were acquired through interviews with relevant stakeholders to analyze the use of destination branding strategies and understand existing and potential synergies with heritage institutions. The quantitative portion measures MICE attendees’ perceptions of the co-created value of enhancing MICE destinations with cultural heritage appeal. NRPA Conference attendees’ responses provide a practical understanding for stakeholders.

This research provides both practical and theoretical insights for the tourism industry for destination communities, and has salient conceptual and theoretical implications for the academy. The study confirms that MICE tourism, collaborating with cultural heritage assets, can enrich MICE travelers’ travel experiences. The destination brand strategy was identified with supportive cultural heritage resources and an appropriate destination brand framework of MICE tourism was proposed. As confirmed by MICE attendees’ evaluations from the case study, it extends the literature on destination brand, destination brand awareness, destination brand experience, destination brand personality, and destination brand equity.

The empirical exploration of MICE destination branding has been handicapped in existing literature by a lack of conceptual marketing perspectives. This work will lend credence to the important aspect of business destination marketing and stresses building synergy and adding value to MICE tourism experiences. As destination marketing programs become competitive, especially in the context of equitable distribution of monetary benefits across different stakeholders, creating synergies become crucial in the destination. A co-created brand strategy can help make destinations more competitive.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019