Matching Items (12)

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The Changing Landscape of Youth Sports: An Exploration of Youth Athlete's Perceptions and Experiences of Club Sport

Description

Youth club sport has become a dominant part of society and the forefront of many childhoods. Youth sport participation holds various physical, psychological, and social benefits for children but as this industry continues to expand, when poorly managed, sport participation

Youth club sport has become a dominant part of society and the forefront of many childhoods. Youth sport participation holds various physical, psychological, and social benefits for children but as this industry continues to expand, when poorly managed, sport participation can become detrimental (Meân, 2013, p. 339). In this study the experiences and perceptions of female youth club volleyball players (ages 15-17) were explored through semi-structured interviews with a particular focus on key areas of concern identified in the research literature: early specialization, overuse injury, and burnout (Hedstrom & Gould, 2004, p. 4, 15-37). A thematic analysis was used to explore these a priori themes alongside emergent themes that were identified: early motivation and perception, current motivation and perception, pressure and athletic scholarships, perception of high school volleyball, and schedules. The positive perceptions arising from the themes were addressed as a foundation to improve on the negative perceptions. Recommendations to reduce the pressure and stress associated with winning are made, in addition to proposals regarding the schedule of club volleyball in an effort to provide athletes with adequate rest period in order to reduce risks of burnout and overuse injury.
Keywords: youth sport, specialization, overuse injury, burnout, club volleyball.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Mexican-origin circumstantial bilingual: the child, the parent, the advocate

Description

In order to adapt to a new culture and new language, children of immigrant families are faced daily with the responsibility of being the intermediaries between the family and the host culture through their language proficiency (Weisskirch & Alva, 2002).

In order to adapt to a new culture and new language, children of immigrant families are faced daily with the responsibility of being the intermediaries between the family and the host culture through their language proficiency (Weisskirch & Alva, 2002). This thesis looks into the experiences of English-Spanish bilingual children as they bridge the gap between the family and the non-Spanish speaking community through their interpreting/translating skills. With an emphasis on children of Mexican-origin, the goal is to further understand and illuminate how these children manage this communication in an adult society, their feelings and thoughts about their experiences, and the child's perceptions about the influence that this experience may or may not have on their future. A sample of seventeen children agreed to participate in a semi-structured face-to-face interview to share their experiences. The data from these interviews were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach (Braun & Clarke, 2006). A priori themes of circumstantial bilingual and adaptive parentification were the initial focus of the research while being open to emerging themes. The children's accounts of their experiences indicated primarily that the Mexican-origin values of familism and respeto (respect) were a significant influence on them when they interpreted/translated for their family. With these traditional cultural values and norms as the groundwork, the sub-themes of normalcy and stress emerged as supportive elements of the circumstantial bilingual experience. Furthermore, the theme of adaptive parentification and the sub-themes of choice, expectation/responsibility to assist, and equality to parents offered further insight on how adaptive parentification can result as the roles of these children change. There was an emergent theme, identity negotiation, which increases our understanding of what the circumstantial bilingual child encounters as the attempt is made to negotiate his identity as an individual who has to mediate language between two opposing cultures. Due to the language brokering responsibility that are bestowed upon these children, it is concluded that communicative support by the parents is a necessary component of the parent-child relationship in order to nurture and develop these children as they negotiate and create their identity to become the successful leaders of tomorrow.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2013

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An Examination of Communication Practices of Successful Entrepreneur Business Women in the Masculine Business/Corporate Environment

Description

As young women merge into the business world, the business environment structure often asks them to adjust or change their identity to be accepted by their male peers. Such identity changes include adopting masculine forms of professional dress, building relationships

As young women merge into the business world, the business environment structure often asks them to adjust or change their identity to be accepted by their male peers. Such identity changes include adopting masculine forms of professional dress, building relationships in the workplace, and dealing with personal life. Through a qualitative research methodology, the study explores the communication practices that women engage in to succeed in the masculine business/corporate environment. Research indicates various types of limitations in masculine environments in connection with the flexibility of schedule, equal pay, and balance between professional and family life, leading to emotional and psychological impacts. Moreover, findings indicate the use of resistance tools to assist women in the corporate/business environment in leadership mentoring, education, and information found on apps and social media. I highlight practical implications, discuss limitations, and provide recommendations for future directions.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-05

Not Like Other Minorities: A Look into the Asian American Experience Surrounding Family, Education, and Identity

Description

This qualitative project was done as a way to learn more about the personal experiences of Asian American participants surrounding education and how it has impacted their identities, and questions how and if the model minority stereotype has impacted the

This qualitative project was done as a way to learn more about the personal experiences of Asian American participants surrounding education and how it has impacted their identities, and questions how and if the model minority stereotype has impacted the Asian American student particiapnts. 14 participants were interviewed one-on-one to see if there were any patterns in values that their parents had pushed, and revealed that cultural expectations influence the participants’s educational choices, leading to self-regulation in regards to education. Because the shared trait of these participants are being current Asian American students in university at the time of their interviews, experiences range with how acculturated their parents are, the ethnic background of their families, and prior expectations with education.

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Created

Date Created
2021-05

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Conspiracy Talk Among Fan Groups: Narratives Contributing to a Hyperreality

Description

This thesis explores the dialogue surrounding the perceptions of the 2020 election among "theDonald.win" forum site users. More specifically, I examined the representations that arose from the comments posted by users concerning the current state of elections in America. What

This thesis explores the dialogue surrounding the perceptions of the 2020 election among "theDonald.win" forum site users. More specifically, I examined the representations that arose from the comments posted by users concerning the current state of elections in America. What emerged from the representations was a plethora of conspiracy talk. The preexisting literature establishes a catalog of explanations and contributions as to why conspiracy talk is prominent. Explanations for conspiracy talk in the literature ranged from fandom to paranoia in America. This thesis identifies and analyzes the themes, representations, and emotions that are organically created by theDonald.win forum users, with a special focus on conspiracy talk. The uniqueness of this thesis though is its use of the theory of hyperreality, a theory proposed by Jean Baudrillard, to understand users' social realities. By analyzing the comments collected by the users of the site, I construct a vivid representation of the reality within which commentators reside.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2021

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Akanbi Paper

Description

Conversations between immigrant parents and their Americanized children are often difficult conversations to approach. Children are expected to know what they want to do with the rest of their lives from a young age. Sometimes, what the child wants to

Conversations between immigrant parents and their Americanized children are often difficult conversations to approach. Children are expected to know what they want to do with the rest of their lives from a young age. Sometimes, what the child wants to do does not align with what their parents want them to do. It is hard to approach those conversations about pursuing higher education, especially when the response is an unknown variable. This research study aims to determine how those conversations about higher education were viewed from the standpoint of the young adult child. It investigates young adults whose ages span from 18 to 24 and how those conversations they had when they were younger impacted who they became. Using data collected from twelve interviewees whose gender, age, and ethnicity varied, this study examines specific instances in those conversations about higher education between the young adult and their immigrant parents and the main factors behind some shared experiences. I discuss those factors, as well as limitations within the study, and provide future direction recommendations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-12

This is What I Want to Do With My Future: Conversations Between Immigrant Parents and Their Americanized Child on the Topic of Pursuing Higher Education

Description

Conversations between immigrant parents and their Americanized children are often difficult conversations to approach. Children are expected to know what they want to do with the rest of their lives from a young age. Sometimes, what the child wants to

Conversations between immigrant parents and their Americanized children are often difficult conversations to approach. Children are expected to know what they want to do with the rest of their lives from a young age. Sometimes, what the child wants to do does not align with what their parents want them to do. It is hard to approach those conversations about pursuing higher education, especially when the response is an unknown variable. This research study aims to determine how those conversations about higher education were viewed from the standpoint of the young adult child. It investigates young adults whose ages span from 18 to 24 and how those conversations they had when they were younger impacted who they became. Using data collected from twelve interviewees whose gender, age, and ethnicity varied, this study examines specific instances in those conversations about higher education between the young adult and their immigrant parents and the main factors behind some shared experiences. I discuss those factors, as well as limitations within the study, and provide future direction recommendations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-12

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Akanbi Presentation

Description

Conversations between immigrant parents and their Americanized children are often difficult conversations to approach. Children are expected to know what they want to do with the rest of their lives from a young age. Sometimes, what the child wants to

Conversations between immigrant parents and their Americanized children are often difficult conversations to approach. Children are expected to know what they want to do with the rest of their lives from a young age. Sometimes, what the child wants to do does not align with what their parents want them to do. It is hard to approach those conversations about pursuing higher education, especially when the response is an unknown variable. This research study aims to determine how those conversations about higher education were viewed from the standpoint of the young adult child. It investigates young adults whose ages span from 18 to 24 and how those conversations they had when they were younger impacted who they became. Using data collected from twelve interviewees whose gender, age, and ethnicity varied, this study examines specific instances in those conversations about higher education between the young adult and their immigrant parents and the main factors behind some shared experiences. I discuss those factors, as well as limitations within the study, and provide future direction recommendations.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2021-12

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Dialogic Cultural Relationships of Expertise, Knowledge, (Inter)dependence and Power Within the Acculturating Family: Exploring the Technolinguistic Brokering Experiences of Adolescents and Their Immigrant Non-English Speaking Mothers

Description

This dissertation explores the technolinguistic brokering experience of adolescents and (im)migrant non-English speaking mothers in acculturating families. By focusing on the performance of cultural intermediation, I examine the dimensions of technolinguistic brokering and their influence upon the Adolescent Language Technology

This dissertation explores the technolinguistic brokering experience of adolescents and (im)migrant non-English speaking mothers in acculturating families. By focusing on the performance of cultural intermediation, I examine the dimensions of technolinguistic brokering and their influence upon the Adolescent Language Technology Broker (ALTB) and mother relationship. Additionally, I explore the factors of power present as a result of the complexities of the ALTBs role to connect their mother to the English speaking community. This research uses a qualitative approach to explore concepts of expertise, knowledge, (inter)dependence, relational maintenance and quality, and power in the dialogic cultural relationship. Research indicates that expertise in the form of culture, cultural interactions, multilingual, and relational maintenance and quality contribute to the ALTBs capabilities in building cultural relationships. Moreover, to assist in dealing with power tensions created by differing levels of expertise and knowledge, ALTBs and mothers communicatively construct an (inter)dependent cultural relationship. I highlight practical implications, discuss limitations, and provide recommendations for future directions.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
2020

Petersen_Spring_2022 .pdf

Description

The decision to disclose or not disclose information is a personal choice. When medical information is learned, a patient has to make decisions about disclosure. This qualitative research project has the goal of understanding how Latinx participants' cultural values, experiences

The decision to disclose or not disclose information is a personal choice. When medical information is learned, a patient has to make decisions about disclosure. This qualitative research project has the goal of understanding how Latinx participants' cultural values, experiences from this community, and other factors influence the decision to disclose in a romantic relationship. Twelve interviews were conducted using a semi-structured interview guide and the main themes found from analysis of the data cultural and relational influencers. This thesis serves as a resource for healthcare professionals to better understand their Latinx patient population in times where disclosure is encountered.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
2022-05