Matching Items (13)

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The Consequences of Sustainability Initiatives in the Supply Chain Process: Examples of the Intended and Unintended Outcomes

Description

Unintended consequences occur in the supply chain process when managers fail to fully prepare for the social and environmental outcomes of their initiatives. By analyzing these unintended consequences, we are

Unintended consequences occur in the supply chain process when managers fail to fully prepare for the social and environmental outcomes of their initiatives. By analyzing these unintended consequences, we are better prepared to make supply chain initiatives that are truly sustainable for all. This paper utilizes a model developed by Dr. Carter and Dr. Kaufmann which creates a mutually exclusive and exhaustive framework in order to fully develop the relationship between intended and unintended consequences. Furthermore, paradox theory is implemented in order to refine the differences between intended and unintended outcomes to create a clearer understanding. Over the course of this paper, real world examples will be utilized from company social responsibility reports in order to populate and explain the matrix. Through this work, we show how companies take on a broad range of actions with outcomes varying from positive to negative. We expect that through this paper, we can make this topic more easily understood so that further research and understanding can be achieved.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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International Ethics/Customs and Supply Chain Management

Description

The following paper examines the current international code of ethics and customs accompanying global supply chain management. It specifically addresses the legal aspects that contemporary supply chains must consider when

The following paper examines the current international code of ethics and customs accompanying global supply chain management. It specifically addresses the legal aspects that contemporary supply chains must consider when conducting business internationally as well as the customary traditions associated with major regions of current trade. In particular, it describes the simultaneously growing and tepid interest in conducting business with the B.R.I.C. (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) countries to supplement the aforementioned topic with a contemporary issue. In particular, it details the amount, if any, of corruption occurring in each country and describes the influence that these practices have and the complications they create on international trade with the United States.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Negotiations in Supply Chain Management

Description

This Thesis was written to prepare myself for my career in supply chain management and to take a look at negotiations deeper than SCM 355 and 455 did. It was

This Thesis was written to prepare myself for my career in supply chain management and to take a look at negotiations deeper than SCM 355 and 455 did. It was also written to utilize my internship knowledge as a sourcing supply chain intern at UTC Aerospace Systems. My internship has introduced me to all of the possibilities in the procurement part of supply chain and overall got me very excited about my career. Throughout this paper I used prior knowledge from SCM classes, researched SCM articles, and face-to- face negotiations I have been a part of at my internship. I was very excited to learn more and research about negotiations to help me further in my career as a Commodity Manager at American Airlines.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Food Insecurity in America: An Analysis of Our Distribution Problem and the Potential of Urban Agriculture

Description

Food insecurity is defined as inadequate access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food to maintain a healthy life. In 2013, 49.1 million Americans were food insecure. In a country where

Food insecurity is defined as inadequate access to sufficient, safe, and nutritious food to maintain a healthy life. In 2013, 49.1 million Americans were food insecure. In a country where there is an overabundance of food being produced, it is abnormal to think of food insecurity as a serious issue. Although we have the means to produce enough food to feed our population, one in seven households in America suffer from food insecurity every day. Although advances in modern agriculture have proven to increase food production, food insecurity continues to grow every year. To address this issue, this paper analyzes the implications of modern agriculture and its ability to solve food insecurity. Furthermore, an analysis of the capabilities of urban agriculture and the potential benefits to solving food insecurity is conducted. By comparing these two agricultural methods, a clear understanding of the proficiencies of urban agriculture for solving food insecurity is outlined. Traditional production and distribution methods are not enough to help solve this issue. Barriers of conventional agriculture need to be broken, and the potentials of urban agriculture need to be introduced. Implementing various instruments for change, such as food policy councils, zoning ordinances, and community gardens, is how urban agriculture will make its way into America's cities and start to solve the food insecurity issue.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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TOWARD THE THEORY OF THE SUPPLY CHAIN

Description

As our discipline has matured, we have begun to develop theories of supply chain management. However, we submit that a major omission of theory development in the supply chain management

As our discipline has matured, we have begun to develop theories of supply chain management. However, we submit that a major omission of theory development in the supply chain management discipline is that we have failed to develop a theory of what we are managing—a theory of the supply chain. Using a conceptual theory building approach, we introduce foundational premises about the structure and boundary of the supply chain, which can serve as the basis for much needed, additional development of the theory of the supply chain.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-04-01

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A Sustainable Local Food Supply Chain for Phoenix: Vertical Farming in Arizona

Description

This thesis explores the likely impacts of climate change on agricultural production globally and in the state of Arizona, and on agricultural supply chains. It shows increases in severe weather,

This thesis explores the likely impacts of climate change on agricultural production globally and in the state of Arizona, and on agricultural supply chains. It shows increases in severe weather, including hotter temperatures and droughts, will have a negative impact on crop production in the state and on global agricultural supply chains. It also shows the effects on the environment caused by our current cradle-to-grave supply chains. As a partial remedy, this thesis explores the benefits of vertical farming systems and shows how they could be of value to the residents of Arizona.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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The Sustainability of Components of the Supply Chain of Local Business in the Greater Phoenix, Arizona Area that Lead to and Increase Success

Description

In order to graduate with honors from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University, I have completed the following thesis under the direction of Dr. Craig Carter and Dr.

In order to graduate with honors from Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University, I have completed the following thesis under the direction of Dr. Craig Carter and Dr. John Eaton. The purpose of this thesis is to perform preliminary and proprietary research on the sustainability of components of the supply chain of local business within the greater Phoenix, Arizona area in order to determine practices that can lead to and even increase success in a competitive niche of already competitive industries, especially during times of supply chain stress. My hypothesis is that preliminary and proprietary research will both display that the consumer aspect of the supply chain of local business is the most essential, especially if other aspects of the supply chain experience distress. My preliminary research involved breaking down the title of this thesis into four parts: sustainability, supply chain, local business, and the Phoenix local business market and then performing internet research and interviews in order to form a solid understanding of such concepts. Then, I performed my proprietary research, which involved conducting a consumer survey and three interviews with local business owners. Though my hypothesis is not supported, I have learned a lot on the topic of this thesis itself, as well as on the thesis writing process.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Sustainability in Supply Management: An Analysis of Intelligent Supply Chain Designs in Promoting the Triple Bottom Line

Description

Sustainable supply chain management has become increasingly more important for companies over the last decade. The need to create socially and environmentally sustainable supply chains that are also efficient and

Sustainable supply chain management has become increasingly more important for companies over the last decade. The need to create socially and environmentally sustainable supply chains that are also efficient and profitable is no longer something companies should do, but rather something they must do to stay competitive and successful in the long run. Through the examination of scholarly supply chain literature, case studies, and industry reports with an emphasis on digital technology, supply chain, and sustainability, a conceptual model was created to begin the research in the area of cost savings through the use of digital technologies to enable companies to be more sustainable. This paper works to define the terms sustainability, sustainable supply chain management, and intelligent supply chain designs. It focuses on the positive social and environmental impact of the implementation of leading-edge digital technologies in supply management processes by creating transparency, efficiency, and reliability throughout the supply chain. Through an applied analysis of Mattel, Rana Plaza, Nike, and Coca-Cola and a cost-benefit analysis, it is concluded that companies that implement blockchain technology into their supply management process designs may create more sustainable supply chains while increasing savings and increasing profits. Blockchain may provide the reliability and transparency needed to better manage the supply management process which will evoke better business decisions. Intelligent supply chain designs improve the environmental and social sustainability of a company while maintaining a competitive edge.

Keywords. Supply Chain Management, Social Responsibility, Sustainability, Economics, Supply Management, Blockchain, Intelligent Technology
Paper Type. Conceptual Paper

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Essays on Environmental Spillovers in Supply Chains

Description

The phenomenon of global warming and climate change has increasingly attracted attention by researchers in the field of supply chain and operations management. Firms have developed efficient plans and intervention

The phenomenon of global warming and climate change has increasingly attracted attention by researchers in the field of supply chain and operations management. Firms have developed efficient plans and intervention measures to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. While a majority of research in supply chain management has adopted a firm-centric view to study environmental management, this dissertation focuses on the context of GHG emissions reduction by considering a firm’s vertical and horizontal relationships with other parties, and the associated spillover effects. A theoretical framework is first proposed to facilitate the field's understanding of the possible spillover effects in GHG emissions reduction via vertical and horizontal interactions. Two empirical studies are then presented to test the spillover effect in GHG emissions reduction, focusing on the vertical interactions - when firms interact with their supply chain members. Drawing data from Bloomberg Environmental Social and Governance, and Bloomberg SPLC, this study conducts econometric analyses using various models. The results suggest that first, a higher level of supply chain GHG emissions is associated with the adoption of emissions reduction programs by a firm, and that this supply chain leakage contributes to the firm’s financial performance. Second, a firm's supply base innovativeness can contribute to its internal GHG emissions reduction, and this effect is contingent on a firm's supply base structure. As such, this dissertation answers the recent call in the field of supply chain and operations management for more empirical research in socially and environmentally responsible value chains. Further, this study contributes to the literature by providing a better understanding of the externalities that value chain members can impose on one another when pursuing sustainability goals.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Reframing buyer-supplier agency problems beyond the dyad

Description

While agency problems inevitably exist in buyer-supplier relationships, the focus on how to overcome such problems has been confined to the buyer-supplier dyad as if the dyad exists in isolation.

While agency problems inevitably exist in buyer-supplier relationships, the focus on how to overcome such problems has been confined to the buyer-supplier dyad as if the dyad exists in isolation. In this dissertation, I re-frame the agency problems beyond the dyadic relationship between a buyer and its supplier and suggest a new way to overcome agency problems. While the current Agency Theory suggests that the buyer can monitor and provide incentives to mitigate the agency problems, I propose to look beyond the dyad in addressing buyer-supplier agency problems.

In the first chapter, I examine the impact of the “indirect links” in which the buyer is connected to the supplier through a third actor. I propose a conceptual framework that specifies how the indirect links can overcome agency problems through the effects of information exchange, mutual monitoring, power change, and network governance. These different effects are enabled by the indirect links based on the different network positions and levels of connectivity of the third actor. The first chapter provides a theoretical framework for Chapter 2 and 3.

In Chapter 2, the effect of network governance enabled by the indirect links is investigated. In particular, two scenario-based role-play experiments were conducted with managers to examine the effects of dyadic and network governance mechanisms on supplier opportunism. In Study 1, the participants took the perspective of a supplier, while in Study 2, the participants took the role of a buyer. The results show that network governance mechanism reduces the supplier's opportunistic behavioral intentions directly and indirectly through the negative affection prediction, and while suppliers may overlook the buyer's reactions as they make decisions, the buyers are likely to react against the supplier, such as engage in negative word-of-mouth or reduce level of commitment.

Finally, directed sourcing, a direct application of how a buyer could overcome agency problems beyond the dyad, is examined in Chapter 3. Directed sourcing is an emerging sourcing practice in which the buying firms bypass the top-tier suppliers and directly manage or contract with lower-tier suppliers, and research on this new practice is in its infancy. Therefore, multi-tier multi-task principal-agent models are developed to investigate the effect of directed sourcing practice on each member in this three-tier supply chain, comparing with traditional tiered sourcing. The results show that directed sourcing generally benefits the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) and the lower-tier supplier, while it harms the top-tier supplier. Yet, directed sourcing is not always beneficial to the OEM. Therefore, an OEM should be selective in implementing this new strategy.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016