Matching Items (441)

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Facilitating Student Autonomy in the Collegiate Woodwind Studio

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This thesis presents a new study “Fostering Student Autonomy in the Collegiate Woodwind Studio” which gathered pedagogical techniques that collegiate woodwind professors use to foster student autonomy in their woodwind studios. This study defines “student autonomy” as an end-goal of

This thesis presents a new study “Fostering Student Autonomy in the Collegiate Woodwind Studio” which gathered pedagogical techniques that collegiate woodwind professors use to foster student autonomy in their woodwind studios. This study defines “student autonomy” as an end-goal of education, in which students are “self-monitoring, strategizing, and taking responsibility for and ownership of the learning process.” A survey of questions concerning student autonomy was emailed to each of the appointed woodwind studio professors at ASU. Their responses are presented and analyzed in this thesis. The author hypothesized that the professors would show some understanding of various methods that can achieve student autonomy, but the study results showed that the professors had much knowledge and specific examples on how to achieve student autonomy in their studios. All of the participants cited examples of using indirect teaching, peer-learning, student-selected repertoire with teacher guidance, student goal-setting, and practical autonomy in their woodwind studios to facilitate student autonomy. About half of the participants cited examples of using student-to-teacher rapport, technology-mediated feedback, and diversified autonomy in their studios to facilitate student autonomy. Student-selected repertoire was by far the most popular method through which to foster student autonomy. This study found that further research is needed to prove if there is indeed a positive correlation between students who compose music for their woodwind lessons and their level of autonomous learning.

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2019-05

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Making Clarinet Reeds by Hand

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Making Clarinet Reeds by Hand is an instructive manual for the collegiate or professional clarinetist seeking to learn about how to have more control over their reeds. It explores reasons to consider making one’s own clarinet reeds by hand, explains

Making Clarinet Reeds by Hand is an instructive manual for the collegiate or professional clarinetist seeking to learn about how to have more control over their reeds. It explores reasons to consider making one’s own clarinet reeds by hand, explains the process in detail both from starting with tube cane or from commercially purchased reed blanks, and includes a cost and time effectiveness analysis highlighting the benefits and disadvantages of making reeds by hand. The thesis also includes a variety of pictures, diagrams, and infographics to incorporate visual explanation as well as addresses the common mistakes associated with each part of the reed making process. The thesis is organized into many sections and section headings to facilitate quick reference for specific questions, as well as incorporates step-by-step guides that walk through the general reed making process.

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2019-05

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Virtuosity Through the Ages: A Sampling of Virtuosic Clarinet Works

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This thesis explores virtuosity as it applies to the following five clarinet works: Grand Duo Concertant by Carl Maria von Weber, Solo de Concours by André Messager, Caprice by Anders Koppel, Live Wire by Theresa Martin, and The Bangui Anomaly

This thesis explores virtuosity as it applies to the following five clarinet works: Grand Duo Concertant by Carl Maria von Weber, Solo de Concours by André Messager, Caprice by Anders Koppel, Live Wire by Theresa Martin, and The Bangui Anomaly by Eric Mandat. By detailing the clarinet’s development, including its creation in the early 18th century and key innovations over the next several hundred years, the histories of several key clarinet manufacturers are described to further analyze the innovation of music at the time. This background is necessary to understand the foundation of the clarinet and how virtuosity is tied closely to its mechanical development. Based on this fundamental information, virtuosity is comprised of three pillars: technical proficiency, musicianship, and recognition. In order for a piece or performer to be considered virtuosic, they must exemplify all three pillars. Technical proficiency applies to physically manipulating the instrument, including finger agility, articulation, voicing, dynamic and intonation control, among others. Musicianship further describes personal interpretation within stylistic boundaries, and the ability to implement interpretive judgement. Finally, recognition serves as esteemed acknowledgement from a panel of field critics. Accompanying this paper is a creative performance recording of the five aforementioned clarinet pieces, demonstrating virtuosity through a wide range of musical genres and eras.

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2020-05