Matching Items (42)

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Accuracy of Commercially-Available Accelerometers For Measuring Steps

Description

Over the last decade, the ability to track daily activity through step counting devices has undergone major changes. Advanced technologies have brought about new step counting devices and new

Over the last decade, the ability to track daily activity through step counting devices has undergone major changes. Advanced technologies have brought about new step counting devices and new form factors. The validity of these new devices is not fully known. The purpose of this study was to validate and compare the step counting accuracy of commercially available hip- and wrist-worn accelerometers. A total of 185 participants (18-64 years of age) were analyzed for this study, with the sample composed nearly evenly of each gender (53.5% female) and BMI classification (33% overweight, 31.9% obese). Each participant wore five devices including hip-worn Omron HJ-112 and Fitbit One, and wrist-worn Fitbit Flex, Nike Fuelband, and Jawbone UP. A range of activities (some constant among all participants, some randomly assigned) were then used to accumulate steps including walking on a hard surface for 400m, treadmill walking/running at 2mph, 3mph, and ≥5mph, walking up five flights of stairs, and walking down five flights of stairs. To validate the accuracy of each device, steps were also counted by direct observation. Results showed high concordance with directly observed steps for all devices (intraclass correlation coefficient range: 0.86 to 0.99), with hip-worn devices more accurate than wrist-worn devices. Absolute percent error values were lower among hip-worn devices and at faster walking/running speeds. Nike Fuelband consistently was the worst performing of all test devices. These results are important because as pedometers become more complex, it is important that they remain accurate throughout a variety of activities. Future directions for this research are to explore the validity of these devices in free-living settings and among younger and older populations.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Liberating Science: Accelerating the Innovation of Health Technology

Description

Translating research has been a goal of the Department of Health and Human Services since 1999. Through two years of iteration and interview with our community members, we have collected

Translating research has been a goal of the Department of Health and Human Services since 1999. Through two years of iteration and interview with our community members, we have collected insights into the barriers to accomplishing this goal. Liberating Science is a think-tank of researchers and scientists who seek to create a more transparent process to accelerate innovation starting with behavioral health research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Effects of Assisted Cycle Therapy (ACT) and Voluntary Cycling (VC) on Sleep and Leisure Physical Activity in Older Adults with Down Syndrome

Description

Previous research has found improvements in motor and cognitive measures following Assisted Cycle Therapy (AC) in adolescence with Down syndrome (DS). Our study investigated whether we would find improvements in

Previous research has found improvements in motor and cognitive measures following Assisted Cycle Therapy (AC) in adolescence with Down syndrome (DS). Our study investigated whether we would find improvements in older adults with DS on measures of leisure physical activity (GLTEQ) and sleep, which are early indicators of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in persons with Down syndrome. This study consisted of eight participants with Down syndrome between 31 and 51 years old that cycled for 30 minutes 3 x/week for eight weeks either at their voluntary cycling rate (VC) or approximately 35% faster with the help of a mechanical motor (AC). We predicted that, based on pilot data (Gomez, 2015), GLTEQ would either maintain or improve after AC, but would decrease after VC and would stay the same after NC. We predicted that the sleep score may improve after both VC or AC or it may improve more after VC than AC based on pilot data related to leisure activity. Our results were consistent with our prediction that GLTEQ will either maintain or improve after AC but will decrease after VC. Our results were not consistent with our prediction that sleep may improve after both VC or AC or it may improve more after VC than AC, possibly because we did not pre-screen for sleep disorders. Future research should focus on recruiting more participants and using both objective and subjective measures of sleep and physical activity to improve the efficacy of the study.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Measurement of Energy Expenditure During Fast-Paced Vinyasa Flow Yoga

Description

Recent research has confirmed and revealed many physical and mental benefits of yoga. The practice of yoga has spread throughout the western world, where it is widely used for the

Recent research has confirmed and revealed many physical and mental benefits of yoga. The practice of yoga has spread throughout the western world, where it is widely used for the purpose of exercise and fitness. Due to its rise in popularity, there is a need for research regarding the energy expenditure required for different types of yoga. The majority of the literature cites yoga as being an effective exercise for light intensity activity, but there are not as many studies attempting to determine if there are postures and sequences that can meet the requirements for moderate physical activity. In addition, there is a need to validate mobile devices with which to measure energy expenditure (EE) that are compatible with the dynamic movements that occur during yoga. The purpose of this study was to measure energy expenditure of twenty-two yoga practitioners of varying experience during a 30-minute Vinyasa flow yoga practice and from this data collection determine: if an ashtanga-based vinyasa yoga class meets the criteria for moderate intensity physical activity, the reliability between the Actigraph and Oxycon Mobile and the validity of an Actigraph GT3X device worn on the hip in estimating energy expenditure for ashtanga-based vinyasa flow yoga. The Actigraph GT3X and the Oxycon mobile were used to measure energy expenditure. Mean values for energy expenditure recorded by the Oxycon and Actigraph were 3.19 ± 0.42 METs and 1.16 ± 0.23 METs respectively, exhibiting a significant difference in data collection. There was no correlation between the values recorded by the two devices, indicating that the Actigraph was not consistent with the Oxycon Mobile (previously validated for measurement of EE). Results of this study indicate that this Vinyasa flow yoga sequence does satisfy the criteria for moderate intensity physical activity as defined by ACSM with an average EE of 3.19 ± 0.42 METs, and that the Actigraph GT3X is not an accurate device for measurement of EE for yoga.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Comparison of Actigraphic and Subjective Assessment of Sleep Parameters in Healthy Individuals

Description

Sleep diaries and actigraphy are two common methods used to assess sleep subjectively and objectively, respectively. Compared to the gold standard of sleep assessment, polysomnography, sleep diaries and actigraphic methods

Sleep diaries and actigraphy are two common methods used to assess sleep subjectively and objectively, respectively. Compared to the gold standard of sleep assessment, polysomnography, sleep diaries and actigraphic methods are more cost-effective and simpler to use. This study aimed to compare the sleep parameters derived from actigraphy and sleep diaries (total sleep time, sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, wake after sleep onset, percentage of time awake, and sleep efficiency). Based on results from previous similar studies, it was hypothesized that the sleep diaries would overestimate the total sleep time parameter and underestimate wake parameters. Twenty healthy young adults without sleep problems volunteered to participate. The participants wore an Actiwatch 2 on their wrist and filled out a sleep diary every morning for the duration of six days. A high intraclass correlation coefficient value between subjective and objective sleep was found for the parameter total sleep time, even though total sleep time was found to be slightly overestimated by the sleep diaries. Sleep onset latency, wake after sleep onset, number of awakenings, percentage of time awake, and sleep efficiency were underestimated by the sleep diaries and did not have high correlation values. Based off of the ICC results, there does not seem to be a strong correlation between the Actiwatch 2 and the sleep diaries, but looking at the Bland Altman plots, there seems to be agreement between the methods.

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Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Assessing Neighborhood Walkability in South Phoenix

Description

As the prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States rises, opportunities for children to be physically active become more vital. One opportunity for physical activity involves children walking to

As the prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States rises, opportunities for children to be physically active become more vital. One opportunity for physical activity involves children walking to and from school. However, children that live in areas with a pedestrian-unfriendly built environment and a low degree of walkability are less likely to be physically active and more likely to be overweight. The purpose of this study was to study walking routes from schools in low-income neighborhoods in Southwestern United States to a local community center. Walking routes from the three study schools (South Mountain High School, Percy Julian Middle School, and Rose Linda Elementary School) were determined by distance, popularity, and the presence of a major thoroughfare. Segments and intersections, which formed the routes, were randomly selected from each school's buffer region. The walking routes as a whole, along with the segments and intersections, were audited and scored using built environment assessments tools: MAPS, PEQI and Walkability Checklist. These scores were utilized to develop interactive mapping tools to visualize the quality of the routes, segments and intersections and identify areas for improvement. Results showed that the routes from Percy Julian to the Kroc Center were, overall, rated higher than routes from the other two schools. The highest scoring route, from the seven routes studied, was route 2 from Percy Julian to the Kroc Center along Broadway Road. South Mountain High School was overall the worst starting point for walking to the Kroc Center as those three walking routes were graded as the least walkable. Possible areas for improvement include installing traffic calming features along major thoroughfares and reducing the perceived risk to pedestrian safety by beautifying the community by planting greenery. Future directions include studying the built environment in South Phoenix communities that surround the Kroc Center.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Improving Time Management Skills In College Students Using Personalized Interventions

Description

Learning how to manage time efficiently is something that many people struggle with, college students in particular. The purpose of this study was to examine if personalization via self-experimentation of

Learning how to manage time efficiently is something that many people struggle with, college students in particular. The purpose of this study was to examine if personalization via self-experimentation of strategies to improve time management skills is a useful strategy for achieving this goal. This study used a multiple baseline approach with three phases: phase one, the baseline, phase two, which included individuals receiving examples of plausible strategies to improve time management skills, and phase three, which involved the self-experimentation component. Results of this study suggest no significant changes in time management based on self-reported completion of tasks but do indicate a trend towards improved time management skills overall based on the time management questionnaire taken at the beginning and end of the study. These results suggest that further exploration in the use of self-experimentation strategies for improving time management is likely warranted but that current strategies likely require additional research. Results from the interviews indicate that the self-experimentation strategy, as delivered via PACO does increase awareness and thinking about time management.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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Social ecological correlates of workplace sedentary behavior

Description

Background
To identify social ecological correlates of objectively measured workplace sedentary behavior.
Methods
Participants from 24 worksites - across academic, industrial, and government sectors - wore an activPAL-micro accelerometer for

Background
To identify social ecological correlates of objectively measured workplace sedentary behavior.
Methods
Participants from 24 worksites - across academic, industrial, and government sectors - wore an activPAL-micro accelerometer for 7-days (Jan-Nov 2016). Work time was segmented using daily logs. Sedentary behavior outcomes included time spent sitting, standing, in light intensity physical activity (LPA, stepping cadence <100 steps/min), and in prolonged sitting bouts (>30 min). Outcomes were standardized to an 8 h work day. Two electronic surveys were completed to derive individual (job type and work engagement), cultural (lunch away from the desk, walking at lunch and face-to-face interaction), physical (personal printer and office type) and organizational (sector) factors. Mixed-model analyses with worksite-level clustering were performed to examine multi-level associations. Secondary analyses examined job type and sector as moderators of these associations. All models were adjusted for age, race/ethnicity and gender.
Results
Participants (N = 478; 72% female; age: 45.0 ± 11.3 years; 77.8% non-Hispanic white) wore the activPAL-micro for 90.2 ± 15.5% of the reported workday. Walking at lunch was positively associated with LPA (5.0 ± 0.5 min/8 h, P < 0.001). Regular face-to-face interaction was negatively associated with prolonged sitting (−11.3 ± 4.8 min/8 h, P < 0.05). Individuals in private offices sat more (20.1 ± 9.1 min/8 h, P < 0.05), stood less (−21.5 ± 8.8 min/8 h, P < 0.05), and engaged in more prolonged sitting (40.9 ± 11.2 min/8 h, P < 0.001) than those in public office space. These associations were further modified by job type and sector.
Conclusions
Work-specific individual, cultural, physical and organizational factors are associated with workplace sedentary behavior. Associations vary by job type and sector and should be considered in the design of workplace interventions to reduce sedentary behavior.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017-08-31

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Efficacy of a Student-Led, Community-Based, Multifactorial Fall Prevention Program: Stay in Balance

Description

Background: Falls are a major public health concern in older adults. Recent fall prevention guidelines recommend the use of multifactorial fall prevention programs (FPPs) that include exercise for community-dwelling older

Background: Falls are a major public health concern in older adults. Recent fall prevention guidelines recommend the use of multifactorial fall prevention programs (FPPs) that include exercise for community-dwelling older adults; however, the availability of sustainable, community-based FPPs is limited.

Methods: We conducted a 24-week quasi-experimental study to evaluate the efficacy of a community-based, multifactorial FPP [Stay in Balance (SIB)] on dynamic and functional balance and muscular strength. The SIB program was delivered by allied health students and included a health education program focused on fall risk factors and a progressive exercise program emphasizing lower-extremity strength and balance. All participants initially received the 12-week SIB program, and participants were non-randomly assigned at baseline to either continue the SIB exercise program at home or as a center-based program for an additional 12 weeks. Adults aged 60 and older (n = 69) who were at-risk of falling (fall history or 2+ fall risk factors) were recruited to participate. Mixed effects repeated measures using Statistical Application Software Proc Mixed were used to examine group, time, and group-by-time effects on dynamic balance (8-Foot Up and Go), functional balance (Berg Balance Scale), and muscular strength (30 s chair stands and 30 s arm curls). Non-normally distributed outcome variables were log-transformed.

Results: After adjusting for age, gender, and body mass index, 8-Foot Up and Go scores, improved significantly over time [F(2,173) = 8.92, p = 0.0; T0 − T2 diff = 1.2 (1.0)]. Berg Balance Scores [F(2,173) = 29.0, p < 0.0001; T0 − T2 diff = 4.96 (0.72)], chair stands [F(2,171) = 10.17, p < 0.0001; T0 − T2 diff = 3.1 (0.7)], and arm curls [F(2,171) = 12.7, p < 0.02; T0 − T2 diff = 2.7 (0.6)] also all improved significantly over time. There were no significant group-by-time effects observed for any of the outcomes.

Conclusion: The SIB program improved dynamic and functional balance and muscular strength in older adults at-risk for falling. Our findings indicate continuing home-based strength and balance exercises at home after completion of a center-based FPP program may be an effective and feasible way to maintain improvements in balance and strength parameters.

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Date Created
  • 2017-02-27

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Behavioral Periodicity Detection From 24 h Wrist Accelerometry and Associations With Cardiometabolic Risk and Health-Related Quality of Life

Description

Periodicities (repeating patterns) are observed in many human behaviors. Their strength may capture untapped patterns that incorporate sleep, sedentary, and active behaviors into a single metric indicative of better health.

Periodicities (repeating patterns) are observed in many human behaviors. Their strength may capture untapped patterns that incorporate sleep, sedentary, and active behaviors into a single metric indicative of better health. We present a framework to detect periodicities from longitudinal wrist-worn accelerometry data. GENEActiv accelerometer data were collected from 20 participants (17 men, 3 women, aged 35–65) continuously for 64.4±26.2 (range: 13.9 to 102.0) consecutive days. Cardiometabolic risk biomarkers and health-related quality of life metrics were assessed at baseline. Periodograms were constructed to determine patterns emergent from the accelerometer data. Periodicity strength was calculated using circular autocorrelations for time-lagged windows. The most notable periodicity was at 24 h, indicating a circadian rest-activity cycle; however, its strength varied significantly across participants. Periodicity strength was most consistently associated with LDL-cholesterol (r’s = 0.40–0.79, P’s < 0.05) and triglycerides (r’s = 0.68–0.86, P’s < 0.05) but also associated with hs-CRP and health-related quality of life, even after adjusting for demographics and self-rated physical activity and insomnia symptoms. Our framework demonstrates a new method for characterizing behavior patterns longitudinally which captures relationships between 24 h accelerometry data and health outcomes.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-01-04