Matching Items (18)

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Efficient Java native interface for android based mobile devices

Description

Currently Java is making its way into the embedded systems and mobile devices like androids. The programs written in Java are compiled into machine independent binary class byte codes. A

Currently Java is making its way into the embedded systems and mobile devices like androids. The programs written in Java are compiled into machine independent binary class byte codes. A Java Virtual Machine (JVM) executes these classes. The Java platform additionally specifies the Java Native Interface (JNI). JNI allows Java code that runs within a JVM to interoperate with applications or libraries that are written in other languages and compiled to the host CPU ISA. JNI plays an important role in embedded system as it provides a mechanism to interact with libraries specific to the platform. This thesis addresses the overhead incurred in the JNI due to reflection and serialization when objects are accessed on android based mobile devices. It provides techniques to reduce this overhead. It also provides an API to access objects through its reference through pinning its memory location. The Android emulator was used to evaluate the performance of these techniques and we observed that there was 5 - 10 % performance gain in the new Java Native Interface.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011

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Model-based design, simulation and automatic code generation for embedded systems and robotic applications

Description

As the complexity of robotic systems and applications grows rapidly, development of high-performance, easy to use, and fully integrated development environments for those systems is inevitable. Model-Based Design (MBD) of

As the complexity of robotic systems and applications grows rapidly, development of high-performance, easy to use, and fully integrated development environments for those systems is inevitable. Model-Based Design (MBD) of dynamic systems using engineering software such as Simulink® from MathWorks®, SciCos from Metalau team and SystemModeler® from Wolfram® is quite popular nowadays. They provide tools for modeling, simulation, verification and in some cases automatic code generation for desktop applications, embedded systems and robots. For real-world implementation of models on the actual hardware, those models should be converted into compilable machine code either manually or automatically. Due to the complexity of robotic systems, manual code translation from model to code is not a feasible optimal solution so we need to move towards automated code generation for such systems. MathWorks® offers code generation facilities called Coder® products for this purpose. However in order to fully exploit the power of model-based design and code generation tools for robotic applications, we need to enhance those software systems by adding and modifying toolboxes, files and other artifacts as well as developing guidelines and procedures. In this thesis, an effort has been made to propose a guideline as well as a Simulink® library, StateFlow® interface API and a C/C++ interface API to complete this toolchain for NAO humanoid robots. Thus the model of the hierarchical control architecture can be easily and properly converted to code and built for implementation.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Replay debugger for human interactive multiple threaded android applications

Description

Debugging is a boring, tedious, time consuming but inevitable step of software development and debugging multiple threaded applications with user interactions is even more complicated. Since concurrency and synchronism are

Debugging is a boring, tedious, time consuming but inevitable step of software development and debugging multiple threaded applications with user interactions is even more complicated. Since concurrency and synchronism are normal features in Android mobile applications, the order of thread execution may vary in every run even with the same input. To make things worse, the target erroneous cases may happen just in a few specific runs. Besides, the randomness of user interactions makes the whole debugging procedure more unpredictable. Thus, debugging a multiple threaded application is a tough and challenging task. This thesis introduces a replay mechanism for debugging user interactive multiple threaded Android applications. The approach is based on the 'Lamport Clock' concept, 'Event Driven' implementation and 'Client-Server' architecture. The debugger tool described in this thesis provides a user controlled debugging environment where users or developers are allowed to use modified record application to generate a log file. During the record time, all the necessary events like thread creation, synchronization and user input are recorded. Therefore, based on the information contained in the generated log files, the debugger tool can replay the application off-line since log files provide the deterministic order of execution. In this case, user or developers can replay an application as many times as they need to pinpoint the errors in the applications.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2012

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Concurrent Checkpointing for Embedded Real-Time Systems

Description

The Internet of Things ecosystem has spawned a wide variety of embedded real-time systems that complicate the identification and resolution of bugs in software. The methods of concurrent checkpoint

The Internet of Things ecosystem has spawned a wide variety of embedded real-time systems that complicate the identification and resolution of bugs in software. The methods of concurrent checkpoint provide a means to monitor the application state with the ability to replay the execution on like hardware and software, without holding off and delaying the execution of application threads. In this thesis, it is accomplished by monitoring physical memory of the application using a soft-dirty page tracker and measuring the various types of overhead when employing concurrent checkpointing. The solution presented is an advancement of the Checkpoint and Replay In Userspace (CRIU) thereby eliminating the large stalls and parasitic operation for each successive checkpoint. Impact and performance is measured using the Parsec 3.0 Benchmark suite and 4.11.12-rt16+ Linux kernel on a MinnowBoard Turbot Quad-Core board.

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Date Created
  • 2018

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From Formal Requirement Analysis to Testing and Monitoring of Cyber-Physical Systems

Description

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are being used in many safety-critical applications. Due to the important role in virtually every aspect of human life, it is crucial to make sure that a

Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) are being used in many safety-critical applications. Due to the important role in virtually every aspect of human life, it is crucial to make sure that a CPS works properly before its deployment. However, formal verification of CPS is a computationally hard problem. Therefore, lightweight verification methods such as testing and monitoring of the CPS are considered in the industry. The formal representation of the CPS requirements is a challenging task. In addition, checking the system outputs with respect to requirements is a computationally complex problem. In this dissertation, these problems for the verification of CPS are addressed. The first method provides a formal requirement analysis framework which can find logical issues in the requirements and help engineers to correct the requirements. Also, a method is provided to detect tests which vacuously satisfy the requirement because of the requirement structure. This method is used to improve the test generation framework for CPS. Finally, two runtime verification algorithms are developed for off-line/on-line monitoring with respect to real-time requirements. These monitoring algorithms are computationally efficient, and they can be used in practical applications for monitoring CPS with low runtime overhead.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2017

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A modular ROS package for linear temporal logic based motion planning

Description

Objective of this thesis project is to build a prototype using Linear Temporal Logic specifications for generating a 2D motion plan commanding an iRobot to fulfill the specifications. This thesis

Objective of this thesis project is to build a prototype using Linear Temporal Logic specifications for generating a 2D motion plan commanding an iRobot to fulfill the specifications. This thesis project was created for Cyber Physical Systems Lab in Arizona State University. The end product of this thesis is creation of a software solution which can be used in the academia and industry for research in cyber physical systems related applications. The major features of the project are: creating a modular system for motion planning, use of Robot Operating System (ROS), use of triangulation for environment decomposition and using stargazer sensor for localization. The project is built on an open source software called ROS which provides an environment where it is very easy to integrate different modules be it software or hardware on a Linux based platform. Use of ROS implies the project or its modules can be adapted quickly for different applications as the need arises. The final software package created and tested takes a data file as its input which contains the LTL specifications, a symbols list used in the LTL and finally the environment polygon data containing real world coordinates for all polygons and also information on neighbors and parents of each polygon. The software package successfully ran the experiment of coverage, reachability with avoidance and sequencing.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013

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Register file organization for coarse-grained reconfigurable architectures: compiler-microarchitecture perspective

Description

Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Architectures (CGRA) are a promising fabric for improving the performance and power-efficiency of computing devices. CGRAs are composed of components that are well-optimized to execute loops and rotating

Coarse-Grained Reconfigurable Architectures (CGRA) are a promising fabric for improving the performance and power-efficiency of computing devices. CGRAs are composed of components that are well-optimized to execute loops and rotating register file is an example of such a component present in CGRAs. Due to the rotating nature of register indexes in rotating register file, it is very challenging, if at all possible, to hold and properly index memory addresses (pointers) and static values. In this Thesis, different structures for CGRA register files are investigated. Those structures are experimentally compared in terms of performance of mapped applications, design frequency, and area. It is shown that a register file that can logically be partitioned into rotating and non-rotating regions is an excellent choice because it imposes the minimum restriction on underlying CGRA mapping algorithm while resulting in efficient resource utilization.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Asymmetric multiprocessing real time operating system on multicore platforms

Description

The need for multi-core architectural trends was realized in the desktop computing domain fairly long back. This trend is also beginning to be seen in the deeply embedded systems such

The need for multi-core architectural trends was realized in the desktop computing domain fairly long back. This trend is also beginning to be seen in the deeply embedded systems such as automotive and avionics industry owing to ever increasing demands in terms of sheer computational bandwidth, responsiveness, reliability and power consumption constraints. The adoption of such multi-core architectures in safety critical systems is often met with resistance owing to the overhead in migration of the existing stable code base to the new system setup, typically requiring extensive re-design. This also brings about the need for exhaustive testing and validation that goes hand in hand with such a migration, especially in safety critical real-time systems.

This project highlights the steps to develop an asymmetric multiprocessing variant of Micrium µC/OS-II real-time operating system suited for a multi-core system. This RTOS variant also supports multi-core synchronization, shared memory management and multi-core messaging queues.

Since such specialized embedded systems are usually developed by system designers focused more so on the functionality than on the coding standards, the adoption of automatic production code generation tools, such as SIMULINK's Embedded Coder, is increasingly becoming the industry norm. Such tools are capable of producing robust, industry compliant code with very little roll out time. This project documents the process of extending SIMULINK's automatic code generation tool for the AMP variant of µC/OS-II on Freescale's MPC5675K, dual-core Microcontroller Unit. This includes code generation from task based models and multi-rate models. Apart from this, it also de-scribes the development of additional software tools to allow semantically consistent communication between task on the same kernel and those across the kernels.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Towards efficient online reasoning about actions

Description

Modeling dynamic systems is an interesting problem in Knowledge Representation (KR) due to their usefulness in reasoning about real-world environments. In order to effectively do this, a number of different

Modeling dynamic systems is an interesting problem in Knowledge Representation (KR) due to their usefulness in reasoning about real-world environments. In order to effectively do this, a number of different formalisms have been considered ranging from low-level languages, such as Answer Set Programming (ASP), to high-level action languages, such as C+ and BC. These languages show a lot of promise over many traditional approaches as they allow a developer to automate many tasks which require reasoning within dynamic environments in a succinct and elaboration tolerant manner. However, despite their strengths, they are still insufficient for modeling many systems, especially those of non-trivial scale or that require the ability to cope with exceptions which occur during execution, such as unexpected events or unintended consequences to actions which have been performed. In order to address these challenges, a theoretical framework is created which focuses on improving the feasibility of applying KR techniques to such problems. The framework is centered on the action language BC+, which integrates many of the strengths of existing KR formalisms, and provides the ability to perform efficient reasoning in an incremental fashion while handling exceptions which occur during execution. The result is a developer friendly formalism suitable for performing reasoning in an online environment. Finally, the newly enhanced Cplus2ASP 2 is introduced, which provides a number of improvements over the original version. These improvements include implementing BC+ among several additional languages, providing enhanced developer support, and exhibiting a significant performance increase over its predecessors and similar systems.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Dynamic analysis of embedded software

Description

Most embedded applications are constructed with multiple threads to handle concurrent events. For optimization and debugging of the programs, dynamic program analysis is widely used to collect execution information while

Most embedded applications are constructed with multiple threads to handle concurrent events. For optimization and debugging of the programs, dynamic program analysis is widely used to collect execution information while the program is running. Unfortunately, the non-deterministic behavior of multithreaded embedded software makes the dynamic analysis difficult. In addition, instrumentation overhead for gathering execution information may change the execution of a program, and lead to distorted analysis results, i.e., probe effect. This thesis presents a framework that tackles the non-determinism and probe effect incurred in dynamic analysis of embedded software. The thesis largely consists of three parts. First of all, we discusses a deterministic replay framework to provide reproducible execution. Once a program execution is recorded, software instrumentation can be safely applied during replay without probe effect. Second, a discussion of probe effect is presented and a simulation-based analysis is proposed to detect execution changes of a program caused by instrumentation overhead. The simulation-based analysis examines if the recording instrumentation changes the original program execution. Lastly, the thesis discusses data race detection algorithms that help to remove data races for correctness of the replay and the simulation-based analysis. The focus is to make the detection efficient for C/C++ programs, and to increase scalability of the detection on multi-core machines.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015