Matching Items (25)

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Shin-hanga and Sosaku-hanga

Description

The early to mid 20th century saw the rise of two woodblock print movements, shin-hanga and sosaku-hanga. Both movements involved changes in style and production in a time of changing

The early to mid 20th century saw the rise of two woodblock print movements, shin-hanga and sosaku-hanga. Both movements involved changes in style and production in a time of changing landscapes and tastes. Increased industrialization and greater international contact impacted both movements, while an awareness of a market abroad and embracing modern art sensibilities defined shin- hanga and sosaku-hanga respectively. Ten prints by 6 sosaku-hanga artists and 4 shin-hanga artists demonstrate the conventions and variations of their respective styles. A close analysis of two prints applies the history of Japan and printmaking to two prints from different movements. A catalogue of all ten prints provides a brief overview of works in relation to their historical influences. Comparisons with the ukiyo-e prints from earlier Japan create a greater understanding of the shin-hanga prints discussed, while the lives of the artists themselves help elucidate readings of sosaku-hanga prints. Analyzing the work of sosaku-hanga artist Shiko Munakata demonstrates the tension that results from the combination of modern art and traditional craft that inform the perspectives of artists in that movement. A print by Takahashi Shotei reveals shin-hanga's approach to portraying modernizing Japan. Both movements addressed changes in Japanese society and formed relationships with the international art community.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Bodyscapes

Description

Many cultures find connections between humans and nature. Chinese philosophies such as Daoism assert that mountains are sacred beings of cosmic energy. These cosmic beings have elements that coincide with

Many cultures find connections between humans and nature. Chinese philosophies such as Daoism assert that mountains are sacred beings of cosmic energy. These cosmic beings have elements that coincide with parts of the human body: rocks are bones, water is blood and veins, trees and grass are hair, clouds and mist are breath, the mountains themselves are the body. "Bodyscapes" is an exploration of these concepts using charcoal and ink to merge the human form with natural landscape.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

What the Dragons Know

Description

China's wildlife and the deep connection I felt with it fuelled "What the Dragons Know," a self-published children's book that I wrote and illustrated. My objective was to create a

China's wildlife and the deep connection I felt with it fuelled "What the Dragons Know," a self-published children's book that I wrote and illustrated. My objective was to create a fun and interesting book for children that gave abroad introduction to Chinese wildlife, art and animal mythology. The Chinese landscape has a captivating and unique beauty, which competes daily with the devastating effects of pollution. This project was the manifestation of the passion and sorrow I felt for that landscape. I drew on these feelings, as well as personal past experiences and research into Chinese art, to portray the magnificence of that world and hopefully inspire others. My approach to this challenge consisted of researching Chinese art theories, styles, and techniques, and choosing aspects from all eras that I felt would most engage young readers. I then interpreted and transformed what I'd learned, filling it with my personal style and character. Dong Qichang, a Ming scholar-official, artist and art theorist, emphasized transformation of older models. He, among others, believed that artists should refer to the masters for guidance: using old models as inspiration, imbuing them with one's own style, and creating their own works. His ideas and those of other literati painters drove my approach to this project. This was not so much an effort to make the pictures "look Chinese" per se, but instead my own interaction with and response to Chinese art and art history. My approach to the writing process began with researching Chinese animal symbolism, which I planned to incorporate into my writing. I then outlined an interesting plot and began writing the story, which in turn influenced the illustrations. Like artists of Emperor Huizong's court who painted pictures based on lines of poetry, I also based my compositions around what was happening in the narrative \u2014 using each picture to capture a moment in the story. The illustrations, although primarily intended to be aesthetically appealing, were an experiment with how I reacted to and interacted with the long and intriguing history of Chinese painting. Essentially, I intended to complete a book that was both enjoyable to read and appealing to look at; that would portray the splendor of the Chinese landscape and reflect my feelings for it. The final book will be self-published using CreateSpace.com, and copies will be available for purchase during the Celebrating Honors Symposium or through Amazon.com.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

Phoebus 2: A Journal of Art History

Description

Phoebus 2: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” by Jack Breckenridge, p. 3.

“Contributors” p. 4-5.

“Table of Contents” p. 6-7.

“The Problem of Antisolimenismo in Neapolitan Baroque Painting” by

Phoebus 2: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” by Jack Breckenridge, p. 3.

“Contributors” p. 4-5.

“Table of Contents” p. 6-7.

“The Problem of Antisolimenismo in Neapolitan Baroque Painting” by Donald Rabiner, p. 8-16.

“Mid-Fourteenth Century Painting in Suchou: Some Lesser Masters” by Claudia Brown, p. 17-30.

“A Re-Examination of the Cult of Demeter and the Meaning of the Eleusinian Mysteries” by Sherly Farness, p. 31-38. 

“Arizona Portfolio” p. 39-53. 

          “Wooden Cross” by Mildred Monteverde, p. 40-43.

          “Le Petit Tablier” by Rosalind Robinson, p. 44-47.

          “La Réunion des plus Célèbres Monuments Antiques de la France” by Vicki C. Wright, p.
          48-53. 

“An Unpublished Rowlandson Sketchbook” by Anthony Gully, p. 54-74.

“Are We Ready for Shih-T'ao?” by Ju-hsi Chou, p. 75-87. 

A Conversation Between Adolph Gottlieb and Jack Breckenridge” transcribed by Jack Breckenridge, p. 88-96. 

“Three Recent Art Reference Books” by Winberta Yao, p. 97-102

Contributors

Created

Date Created
  • 1979

Phoebus 6, Number 1: Chinese Painting under the Qianlong Emperor

Description

Phoebus 6, Number 1: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” p. 7-8.

“The Time of Qianlong (1736-1795)” by Wen Fong, p. 9-16.

“The Intellectual Climate in Eighteenth-century China: Glimpses

Phoebus 6, Number 1: A Journal of Art History - Table of Contents

“Preface” p. 7-8.

“The Time of Qianlong (1736-1795)” by Wen Fong, p. 9-16.

“The Intellectual Climate in Eighteenth-century China: Glimpses of Beijing, Suzhou, and Yangzhou in the Qianlong Period” by Frederick Mote, p. 17-55.

“The Qianlong Emperor’s Skill in the Connoisseurship of Chinese Painting” by Kohara Hironobu, p. 56-73.

“An Overview of Stylistic Development in the Qianlong Painting Academy” by She Cheng, p. 74-90.

“Document and Portrait: the Southern Tour Paintings of Kangxi and Qianlong” by Maxwell Hearn, p. 91-131.

“Tangdai: A Biographical Sketch” by Ju-hsi Chou, p. 132-140. 

“For the Love of God: Castiglione at the Qing Imperial Court” by Howard Rogers, p. 141-160.

“Approaches to Painting at the Qianlong Court” by Claudia Brown, p. 163-168.

“Notes” p. 169-198. 

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 1988

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Mirrors and fears: humans in the bestiary

Description

The medieval bestiary is often simply described as a moralized "encyclopedia of animals," however, these so-called "books of beasts" were made for humans, by humans, about humans. It is therefore

The medieval bestiary is often simply described as a moralized "encyclopedia of animals," however, these so-called "books of beasts" were made for humans, by humans, about humans. It is therefore surprising that one common pictorial subject of the bestiary has been left unexamined: humans. By viewing bestiary images through this lens, one may easily see man's underlying and unresolved struggle to maintain dominance over the beasts, and the Others projected onto them, thereby ensuring that "the (hu)man" remains a discrete definition. This study begins as the bestiary does, with the Naming of the Animals. Illustrations of Adam as a king, bestowing names of his choosing upon tame beasts express a kind of nostalgia for a now-lost time when humanity was secure in their identity as non-animal. This security no longer exists in the postlapsarian world, nor in the bestiary images following these scenes. In an attempt to maintain the illusion of dominion, many bestiary illuminations forego simple descriptive images in favor of gory hunting scenes. However, these conspicuous declarations of dominion only serve to highlight the fragility of the physical form, and even demonstrate the frailty of the human (male, Christian) identity. One such example is MS Bodley 764's boar illumination, in which the animal is killed at the hands of male hunters. This thesis unpacks this image of dominion in order to reveal the associated insecurities regarding race, gender, and species that lie beneath the surface. Subsequently, the study turns to the many bestiary images depicting human bodies brutally fragmented within the jaws of an animal. Anthropophagous bestiary animals often carry fears of the gender and ethnic Other; despite the bestiary's posturing of order and hierarchy, both the human body and identity are easily consumed and subsumed into the ever-present animal/Other. Just as in life, the human figures in the bestiary struggle to establish unquestioned dominion, only to be constantly undercut by the abject. By using a psychoanalytic approach to the human bodies of the bestiary, this study will explore how this imagery reflects the ambiguous position and definition of the human.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014

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Mythological Women and Sex: Transgression in Christian and Buddhist Religious Imagery

Description

Many religious textual accounts describe provocative women: The Great Whore

from the Apocalypse, Saint Mary Magdalene from the New Testament, and the

Daughters of Mara from the Buddhist tradition are all accused

Many religious textual accounts describe provocative women: The Great Whore

from the Apocalypse, Saint Mary Magdalene from the New Testament, and the

Daughters of Mara from the Buddhist tradition are all accused of fornication or the

seduction of men. However, when artists have depicted these subjects, the women are

rarely shown transgressing in the ways the texts describe. The Great Whore is often

masculinized and shown as the equal of kings, Mary Magdalene assumes divergent

attitudes about prostitution in early Renaissance Europe, and the Daughters of Mara are

comparable to other Buddhist deities, recognizable only from the surrounding narrative.

Therefore, in this inquiry, I seek out the ways that artists have manipulated misogynistic

religious narratives and introduced their own fears, concerns, and interpretations.

Artistic deviations from the text indicate a sensitivity to cultural values beyond

the substance of their roles within the narrative. Both the Great Whore and her virtuous

counterpart, the Woman Clothed in the Sun, have agency, and the ways they are shown to

use their agency determines their moral status. Mary Magdalene, the patron saint of

prostitutes and a reformed sinner, is shown with iconographical markers beyond just

prostitution, and reveals the ways in which Renaissance artists conceptualized prostitution. In

the last case study, the comparison between the Daughters and the Buddhist savioresses,

the Taras, demonstrates that Himalayan artists did not completely subscribe to the textual

formulations of women as inherently iniquitous. Ultimately, these works of art divulge

not just interpretations of the religious traditions, but attitudes about women in general,

and the power they wielded in their respective contexts.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2020

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Chen Rong and the transformation of Nine dragons

Description

This dissertation is the first detailed and extensive study dedicated to the life and art of the master artist and scholar-official Chen Rong (active 13th century), and offers an expanded

This dissertation is the first detailed and extensive study dedicated to the life and art of the master artist and scholar-official Chen Rong (active 13th century), and offers an expanded analysis of his most famous work, the Nine Dragons scroll (1244). It provides a reconstruction of Chen Rong's biography, character and political career, and discusses his significance and impact in the study of Chinese painting during the late Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279) and beyond, by highlighting the reception and interpretation of the Nine Dragons scroll in the past and in modern times. This is achieved by addressing writings such as eulogies, poems and commentary about Chen Rong by his contemporaries and later biographers, and also analysis of recent works by contemporary Chinese artists that reinterpret Chen Rong's Nine Dragons motif directly. In addition to offering an expanded reading and interpretation of Chen Rong's inscriptions on the Nine Dragons scroll and inscriptions by subsequent viewers of the scroll, this study sheds light on the artistic context, significance, and historical development of dragons and dragon painting in China. This dissertation also offers the first full English transcription and translation of Emperor Qianlong's inscription on the Nine Dragons scroll, and that of his eight officials. Furthermore, this dissertation includes two detailed appendices; one is a detailed appendix of all of Chen Rong's paintings documented to exist today, and the second is a list of paintings attributed to Chen Rong that have been mentioned in historical documents that no longer appear extant. This interdisciplinary study provides insight into the processes that influence how an artist's work is transformed beyond his time to that of legendary status. This clarification of Chen Rong's biography and artistic activity, particularly with respect to his most famous work the Nine Dragons scroll, contributes to modern scholarship by providing an expanded understanding of Chen Rong's life and art, which in turn, adjusts prevailing perceptions of his life and work.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2012