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An Observational Study of the Motivation of Long Distance Cyclists During Faith Based Charity Ride

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This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women: n=12) cycled at least one 302 mile segment of a

This observational study explored the motivational factors for recreational cyclists participating in a charity cycling event held by a Christian based nonprofit, the Fuller Center. Participants (n=22; men: n=10; women: n=12) cycled at least one 302 mile segment of a bike ride distancing the whole West Coast (1,657 miles). The purpose of the study was to determine the motives for the cyclists' participation and to then classify those motives as intrinsic or extrinsic. A scale used to measure motivation of marathoners was transcribed to match those of the cycling participants to assess motivation. The participants were divided into 4 groups based on self-reported experience levels, and it was shown that across all types of experience levels, both intrinsic and extrinsic motivators were expressed but with greater emphasis on intrinsic factors. The most commonly indicated intrinsic motivation subcategories were life meaning, personal goal achievement, and affiliation, with affiliation being recognized by every individual. The most commonly indicated extrinsic subcategories were competition, recognition, health orientation, and weight concern. Though each rider's story was signature to the individual, the very specific religious background and philanthropic mission of the Fuller Center Bike Adventure weighed heavily into each individual's motivation alongside the classified intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Therefore, this research offered valuable data about motivation of recreational cyclists but future studies should focus on a less specific population.

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2018-05

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Predictive Power of Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model on Physical Therapy Patients' Adherence to Home Exercise Program

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The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the constructs of motivational theories, Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model, and adherence to a home exercise program. The constructs of Self-Determination Theory are autonomy, competence,

The purpose of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the constructs of motivational theories, Self-Determination Theory and Health Belief Model, and adherence to a home exercise program. The constructs of Self-Determination Theory are autonomy, competence, and social relatedness. The constructs of Health Belief Model are perceived benefits, perceived barriers, perceived severity, and perceived susceptibility. Participants were receiving therapy at two outpatient clinics located in the Phoenix metropolitan area (n=40). Autonomy was assessed with a modified Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire. Competence was assessed with a modified Perceived Competence Scale. Social relatedness was assessed with a modified Health Care Climate Questionnaire. Perceived benefits and barriers were measured with a modified Exercise Benefits/Barriers Scale. Perceived severity and susceptibility were measured with a modified Health Beliefs Questionnaire. Adherence was measured with one Likert-type question that was created by the researchers. The data was scored and analyzed with the scoring guidelines provided by the questionnaires and the statistics software, IBM Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The results showed that competence was the only construct that was significantly correlated with home exercise program adherence. The results from this study should be used for further research that focuses on creating a competence-supportive environment in physical therapy settings.

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2018-12

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Therapp: A Physical Therapy Application to Improve Patient at Home Progress

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Research indicates patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs is low and this is confirmed anecdotally by people working in the field. Many patients do not improve at the desired rate because they are only coming into the clinic

Research indicates patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs is low and this is confirmed anecdotally by people working in the field. Many patients do not improve at the desired rate because they are only coming into the clinic for two to three days a week and then do not continue with their exercises at home. This thesis project was focused on designing a mobile application that would better help physical therapists facilitate home exercises for their patients. The goals of this application were to make it easier for patients to remember what they need to do and how often they need to do it, to increase patient improvements by making it easier to access and complete assigned exercises, and to make the physical therapist more efficient and effective by assigning the exercises through a program that can be easily altered. In order to create this application, research on self-efficacy, adherence, and behavior strategies and theories was collected. Then, interviews with physical therapists and patients were completed to determine what content should be added to the application for patients to be successful and to determine what features they believed would best facilitate exercise adherence. Lastly, the application and its features were designed based on the collected research and interviews.

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2018-12

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Development of a Shear-Thickening Prophylactic Knee Brace

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The objective of this project was to complete an in-depth design study for the creation of a prophylactic knee brace. Background literature research analysis demonstrated that soft tissue injuries of the knee were the most prominent injuries related to the

The objective of this project was to complete an in-depth design study for the creation of a prophylactic knee brace. Background literature research analysis demonstrated that soft tissue injuries of the knee were the most prominent injuries related to the knee joint. The literature exhibited that the leading injury of the knee joint consisted of ACL lesions and meniscal tears. Utilizing the information obtained, it was determined that the objective of the knee brace was to emphasize prophylaxis of soft tissue injuries. As such, further analysis was performed in order to analyze injury mechanisms and knee joint biomechanics that would be relevant in injury prevention. An epidemiological review was also conducted regarding current braces that existed in the market today. These results were accounted for when formulating a novel design for the prophylactic device. The key feature of the brace is the implementation of shear-thickening fluid, a non-Newtonian fluid that is able to exhibit fluid-like properties at rest and solid-like properties when impacted by an outside force. This unique property is ideal for a knee brace for its enhanced adaptability and protective effects. A three dimensional digital prototype was designed in a SolidWorks software as the final result. Future endeavors consist of developing a physical prototype and conducting stress and strain analysis of the device in addition to testing its efficacy in human trials. After completion of testing and necessary revisions the goal will be to patent the technology and commercialize the brace into a device available on the public market.

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2017-12

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Translation of Physical Activity from Adolescence to Adulthood in Women: Investigating the Relationship Between Adolescent Engagement in Coordination and Performance Activities and Adult Physical Activity Levels

Description

Physical activity has been shown to be effective in primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (Warburton, Nicol & Bredin, 2006). Women tend to be much less active than males and are henceforth

Physical activity has been shown to be effective in primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease (Warburton, Nicol & Bredin, 2006). Women tend to be much less active than males and are henceforth at a greater risk for developing these conditions (Biddle & Mutrie, 2008). This study addresses what impact type of physical activity in adolescence has on adult physical activity levels in the female population. Specifically, the study focuses on coordination and performance activities in adolescence, and how adult physical activity levels compare to both sedentary adolescents and adolescent endurance and ball sport athletes. Ninety-six female participants that were ages 20-29 (N=53) and 30-39 (N=43) were asked to fill out a survey about their adolescent activity levels and their current activity levels. Those participants who identified as participating in coordination and performance activity (N=43) were compared to those who were sedentary (N=14) and then further compared to those who engaged in other types of adolescent activity (N=39). It was determined that coordination and performance activities during adolescence did have a significant effect on frequency of female adult physical activity when compared to their sedentary counterparts (p=0.015). Adolescent endurance and ball sport athletes did tend to have a greater frequency of current activity in adulthood than those involved in coordination and performance activities, which was attributed to a greater frequency of practice per week in those sports. In conclusion, introducing a frequent amount of physical activity the female adolescent enjoys increases their likelihood of frequently engaging in physical activity as an adult.

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2015-12

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Review of Current ACL Graft Choices and Recommendations for Improved Graft and Repair Mechanisms

Description

Ruptures in the anterior cruciate ligament are a prevalent injury, particularly in young athletes. This injury is frequently treated with surgical repair utilizing autologous tissue, cadaver allografts or synthetic grafts. However there is no definitive answer on which is the

Ruptures in the anterior cruciate ligament are a prevalent injury, particularly in young athletes. This injury is frequently treated with surgical repair utilizing autologous tissue, cadaver allografts or synthetic grafts. However there is no definitive answer on which is the best graft option. This review aims to compare clinical results of patellar tendon autograft (PT), hamstring autograft (HT), cadaver allograft and LARS synthetic ligament in ACL reconstruction. The ASU library was systematically searched for comparison studies or meta-analyses that compared or described ACL reconstruction graft options. The results of the studies were analyzed according to re-tear rate, return to pre-injury level of activity, KT-1000 laxity scores, post-operative muscle strength, International Knee Documentation Committee Score (IKDC), Lysholm score, Lachman test and donor site morbidity. Allografts showed the highest re-tear rate and increase in laxity when compared with the PT autograft and HT autograft. PT autograft provided the most stability according to the KT-1000 results. Knee extensor muscle strength was not graft dependent, but knee flexor strength decreased significantly in HT autograft patients. All grafts showed comparable results for IKDC, Lysholm scores and Lachman tests. There was increased anterior knee pain in PT autograft patients however this did not seem to have an affect on the stability or durability of the graft. The PT autograft is the best choice for individuals undergoing ACL reconstruction on the basis of lower re-tear rates and greater joint stability.

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2015-05

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Optimize Your Resistance Training

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Resistance training is a modality of exercise that has grown in popularity over the past two decades, particularly for its role in improving muscular fitness by increasing muscular strength, power, and hypertrophy. Due to this increase in demand, more and

Resistance training is a modality of exercise that has grown in popularity over the past two decades, particularly for its role in improving muscular fitness by increasing muscular strength, power, and hypertrophy. Due to this increase in demand, more and more people are entering the gym for their first time and eager to learn about the ways to get bigger and stronger as fast as possible. The aim of this summary is to provide evidence-based information that resistance trainers or fitness personnel can use to design an effective training program. In order to optimize your resistance training protocol there are three main areas to focus on: increasing volume, managing intensity, and active recovery.

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2020-05

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Muscle Recovery; Review of Cold-Water Immersion Therapy

Description

Athletes often train consecutive days in a row without a period of rest long enough to fully
recover before the next training session. Regular muscle soreness usually resolves in a week, but rarely do athletes get that time to recover.

Athletes often train consecutive days in a row without a period of rest long enough to fully
recover before the next training session. Regular muscle soreness usually resolves in a week, but rarely do athletes get that time to recover. While muscle recovery is important for optimizing daily functioning, it is also of growing importance for athletes to optimize their athletic performance. Cold water immersion is a common technique used to improve muscle recovery. Whether CWI improves the body’s physiological recovery response or impacts the individual’s psychological recovery is unknown, but research has shown that cold water immersion performed at 10-15 degrees Celsius and immersion times between 5 and 15 minutes are better for muscle recovery than passive recovery.

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Date Created
2020-05

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The Effects of Physical Activity Prescriptions on Psychological Outcomes

Description

Research on the correlation between exercise and mental health outcomes has been a growing field for the past few decades. It is of specific interest to look at how physical activity affects psychological outcomes and it’s efficacy for treating

Research on the correlation between exercise and mental health outcomes has been a growing field for the past few decades. It is of specific interest to look at how physical activity affects psychological outcomes and it’s efficacy for treating mental health disorders. The current treatment options for depression and anxiety are not suitable for everyone and therefore there is a need for a more accessible and cost-effective form of treatment, like exercise. Furthermore, exercise as a treatment is also linked with many more health benefits. Indeed a wealth of studies have explored the relationships between exercise and depression as well as exercise and anxiety, showing exercise to be a positive predictor of mental health. The following paper will serve to: define depressive and anxiety disorders, explore the research on the effects of physical activity prescriptions on the outcomes of such disorders, create evidence-based applied recommendations for different disorders, and explore the mechanisms by which exercise mitigates symptoms to ultimately accredit the prescription of exercise as a form of treatment for mental health disorders.

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2020-05

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Effect of Causal Attributions by Physical Therapy Patients for Recovery on Rehabilitation Adherence and Outcome Success

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The purpose of the present study was to determine if a relationship exists between adaptive patterns of causal attributions, adherence, and outcome success in physical therapy behavior. Adaptive casual attributions were defined as internal, controllable, and stable attributions as per

The purpose of the present study was to determine if a relationship exists between adaptive patterns of causal attributions, adherence, and outcome success in physical therapy behavior. Adaptive casual attributions were defined as internal, controllable, and stable attributions as per Weiner's Attribution Theory of Motivation. Participants were seeking physical therapy for a post-surgical knee injury, with (n=3). Attributions were measured using the CDSII questionnaire, and outcome success was measured by the KOOS questionnaire to assess various dimensions of knee functionality. The respective physical therapist for the patient also completed the RAdMAT questionnaire to measure adherence. The data collected for all participants was analyzed qualitatively, with some emphasis on quantitative findings. Results showed mixed evidence for a relationship between adaptive attributions and adherence across the three participants. A trend toward a relationship between adaptive attributions and outcome success was observed in one participant. In addition, it was observed that adherence does play an indirect role in relating adaptive attributions and outcome success for physical therapy. Conclusions drawn from this pilot study should be used to further educate physical therapists and respective patients in how to improve adherence and experience positive outcomes for rehabilitation.

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2013-05