Matching Items (15)

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Design & Community Development: The Built Environment's Role in the Health of Native American Communities

Description

The institutionalized environments of government aid, void of architectural creativity, are regular sights in Native American communities. Meanwhile, the community falls victim to obesity, diabetes, addiction, and many other maladies.

The institutionalized environments of government aid, void of architectural creativity, are regular sights in Native American communities. Meanwhile, the community falls victim to obesity, diabetes, addiction, and many other maladies. I believe that the design of a community's buildings can greatly affect the health of the community. This thesis focuses on the social aspects of design. How might we enhance the social capital of Native communities through the built environment?

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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The Effect of Retail Design on Consumer Purchasing Behavior

Description

This project researches the potential effects of retail design and layout and how it affects consumer-purchasing behavior. The research can be broken down into three large segments as well as

This project researches the potential effects of retail design and layout and how it affects consumer-purchasing behavior. The research can be broken down into three large segments as well as a case study. The first focuses on the consumers and the target market. The second examines store layout in terms of walkways, wall placements, and major pathways throughout the space. Third, the overall aesthetics and design are studied, focusing on color, texture, shapes, and lighting. Lastly, a case study on a popular women's retail store, Antrhoplogie, is examined based on the above research. This project gives interesting insight into the minds of the consumer in retail environments as well as the effect of design and overall experience the consumers have in many types of retail stores.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Developing Efficiencies in Health Care Design: Using Supply Chain Management Principles to Solve Design Problems

Description

Supply Chain Management has many fundamental principles that can be applied to all businesses to improve efficiency and create more transparency, this in turn, encourages collaboration and fosters healthy professional

Supply Chain Management has many fundamental principles that can be applied to all businesses to improve efficiency and create more transparency, this in turn, encourages collaboration and fosters healthy professional relationships. Using the fundamental principles of supply chain management, I evaluated the Veterans Administration(VA) hospital in regards to their provided treatment for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder(PTSD) to look for places where efficiency can be improved. I analyzed the problem in relation to Supply Chain Management, PTSD, and design in order to create a more complete solution. Once these areas were addressed, I proposed a solution that included creating a separate clinic for PTSD treatment that addressed the current issues in regards to treatment at the VA hospital. My goal was to improve space efficiencies and design a treatment environment that is more evolved and conducive to veterans suffering from PTSD. Though the creation of one PTSD clinic will not be able to completely change the system, it can be a step in the right direction to bring about the change that needs to occur within the VA medical system.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Integrating Hospitality & Hospital Design

Description

Plagued by white walls, cold corridors, sterile layouts, and overall design inefficiency, traditional hospitals have created an ironic sense of fear in most people about visiting a place intended to

Plagued by white walls, cold corridors, sterile layouts, and overall design inefficiency, traditional hospitals have created an ironic sense of fear in most people about visiting a place intended to help them heal. This thesis examines the healing qualities for humans in response to a resort-like atmosphere where they are provided with amenities such as a variety of entertainment, food, and recreation options as well as first-class customer service.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

How Paw's Can Heal: Designing for Animal Assisted Therapy

Description

Design focuses on the ability to change one's emotion, wellness, and an over all sense of self. Designers strive for a positive space that ensures ones safety while at the

Design focuses on the ability to change one's emotion, wellness, and an over all sense of self. Designers strive for a positive space that ensures ones safety while at the same time, making sure the environment is pleasing to the eye. Beyond the design aesthetics, animal assisted therapy is utilized in many scenarios/environments in order to receive the utmost positive outcome in patients and ultimately, creating a peaceful state of mind.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Reinventing the Design Process: Sustainability and Branding

Description

Explore the implications that both sustainability and branding have on the built environment in order to develop a health an wellness center that promotes a balanced lifestyle for two targets users, which are of entirely different demographics.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

Quality versus Quantity and the Role of the Designer in the Manufacturing Process

Description

Modern manufacturing has allowed society to make giant leaps and bounds within the sphere of building. But how much are we sacrificing for this to occur? There is a fine

Modern manufacturing has allowed society to make giant leaps and bounds within the sphere of building. But how much are we sacrificing for this to occur? There is a fine line between a quality product and its counterpart- the quantity product. Who is responsible for maintaining this balance? How can we ensure that the responsible parties are aware of how something will be produced? Designers must be educated in manufacturing processes so that they can act as a quality control buffer and make informed decisions about the product specified. The responsibility of maintaining a balance between quality and quantity (or cost) is a joint one. In some cases, it may fall on the craftsman, who pushes out more product in order to compete in the market today. In others, it may be on the manufacturer, who uses particular methods of building in order to ensure a quality product. However, in most scenarios, furniture is produced to spec, per the intent of a designer. Whether the craftsman or the manufacturer makes the product, some sort of design minded person is behind the order and has the final say on how a piece that they have commissioned will look. A purchase order is issued to a manufacturer or craftsman based on a provided quote. Shop drawings are reviewed by a designer to ensure that the proper materials are used, the proper dimensions are met, and that the aesthetic of the piece matches the designer's vision. In recognizing that a portion of responsibility for the manufacture of product falls onto the designer, who submits a specification to a manufacturer, and approves or denies shop drawings, we can recognize a missing piece of their fundamental education. Newly graduated designers lack basic knowledge about the way things that are used every day are built, how they want them built, and what materials are used to build them. Extensive engineering and labor processes are required to fabricate products; processes that a designer may know nothing about, thereby forfeiting their involvement in quality control. This first section of this paper will strive to address issues of quality versus quantity, and the role of the designer in maintaining a balance between the two. In addition, it will focus on implementing methods to educate designers on manufacturing techniques, essentially creating a quality control mechanism in terms of furniture specification. The second section will consist of a developing course outline addressing the basic knowledge and application of manufacturing techniques for interior designers.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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Pillows for the Generations

Description

Screen printed textiles formed into over-sized pillows and wall hangings encompass the viewer just as emotions and memories envelope a person's state of being. Pillows representing three generations are staged

Screen printed textiles formed into over-sized pillows and wall hangings encompass the viewer just as emotions and memories envelope a person's state of being. Pillows representing three generations are staged in small vignettes created by found and restored antiques to surround the viewer in a tangible representation of the intimacy one feels with important figures in a lifetime.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-12

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The transformation of the modern American kitchen from 1901 through 1964: from hell on earth to the warmest room in the house

Description

Many of the scholars that have chronicled the creation of the modern American kitchen have written about how the technological, societal, and cultural revolutions of the twentieth century played a

Many of the scholars that have chronicled the creation of the modern American kitchen have written about how the technological, societal, and cultural revolutions of the twentieth century played a role in dramatically changing its structure and design. More recently, some scholarly research has focused on the evolution of the kitchen and its meaning over time. In several of these research publications scholars profess that the modern American kitchen, more than any other room, has come to symbolize the center or heart of the home, and the warmest room in the house. However, they are quick to acknowledge that, at the beginning of the twentieth century, the kitchen was not so fondly regarded. Little research exists regarding why individuals increasingly became attached to the kitchen or how that attachment influenced the layout, size, objects, and activities conducted in the kitchen. This thesis fills this void by exploring the implications of place attachment on the evolution of the American kitchen from 1901 through 1964. By approaching this research from a combination of design history and environmental psychology, this thesis provides a new perspective to our understanding of the evolution of kitchen design. Using this two-pronged approach, this study contributes to our understanding of the evolution of the kitchen. This study traces the evolution of the modern American kitchen using two qualitative methodologies: material culture and phenomenology. Drawing from a variety of floor plans, advertisements, and articles contained in the House Beautiful magazine 1901 through 1964, as well as writings from popular domestic advisors of the period, this thesis charts the transformation of the modern American kitchen from a "hell on earth" into the "heart and soul of the home." By combining place attachment theory and kitchen design research this thesis provides interior designers new insight into designing kitchens that foster endearing emotional attachment for our clients.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013

The influence of the Exposition des arts décoratifs et industriels modernes, Paris 1925 on Hollywood films of the late 1920s and 30s

Description

The author explores the influences on the interiors of Hollywood films of the late 1920s and 30s. The Exposition des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, Paris 1925 is examined in

The author explores the influences on the interiors of Hollywood films of the late 1920s and 30s. The Exposition des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, Paris 1925 is examined in historical context and its influence on design trends internationally.

The Hollywood film industry is examined, in general, and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and its longtime art director, Cedric Gibbons, in particular. Eight MGM films are discussed and their interiors analyzed for related influence from the 1925 Paris Exposition.

The thesis makes a case for the influence of the 1925 Paris Exposition on Cedric Gibbons and the interiors of the MGM films of the late 1920s and 30s.

Contributors

Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014