Matching Items (43)

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Restaurant Point-of-Sale Interfaces: Comparisons in Menu Organization and User Efficiency

Description

Careful considerations in designing and organizing information for restaurant point-of-sale (POS) systems can affect user experience. Unfortunately, usability guidelines are sparse for these systems. Applications from other studies, such as

Careful considerations in designing and organizing information for restaurant point-of-sale (POS) systems can affect user experience. Unfortunately, usability guidelines are sparse for these systems. Applications from other studies, such as categorical organization and F-shape, are implemented in an experimental interface as a starting point of discussion. A control interface was designed after the default version of NCR Aloha’s POS program: Aloha Table Service. Novice and expert order taking strategies were also observed to compare input differences. This study examined selection time, total time, and selection accuracy across both order and interface types. The results show that time and number of key presses are significantly reduced under the treatment interface, and that teaching expert order taking strategies to novice users may help reduce cognitive load.

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  • 2016-05

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An Exploration of User-Informed Design

Description

This paper describes the development of a mobile application aimed at facilitating the communication and collaboration of roommates with regards to grocery shopping, food-sharing, and cost-splitting. The approach involves several

This paper describes the development of a mobile application aimed at facilitating the communication and collaboration of roommates with regards to grocery shopping, food-sharing, and cost-splitting. The approach involves several methods of user-informed design. First, I conducted an analysis of user needs, interviewing potential end-users to gauge shopping habits and behaviors. Second, using iterative wireframing and a design tool called Figma, I constructed a working prototype of the design. Third, the prototype was used in a usability study, focused on uncovering pain points and other insights regarding the performance of the app. The usability tests were designed to simulate tasks that users might reasonably encounter when using the app. Finally, a second analysis of user needs was conducted, this time on a much larger scale. These methods were used to develop several informed design decisions that could improve the overall usability in future iterations of the design.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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User Experience Laws in Learning

Description

The relationship between user experience, learning, and psychology is complex. There are many rules and concepts that guide experience design. It is likely that some of the guidance is valid

The relationship between user experience, learning, and psychology is complex. There are many rules and concepts that guide experience design. It is likely that some of the guidance is valid whereas other guidance is not. This explores some of that guidance and evaluates how they are linked to learning. Do the guidance’s made 25, 50, 100 years ago still hold true today? Additionally, the psychological background behind the way someone holds memory is important. Knowing how information is stored and processed helps educators provide the best learning experience possible. With an eye toward perception and cognition, this paper examines the relevance of the various pieces of guidance. The results suggest that, overall, this guidance is still valid and valuable to current learning trends and designs. This suggests that user experience designers for education need to pay attention to the guidance provided by psychology when designing learning management systems, placing content in a course, and choosing which aesthetics to follow.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Measuring the Efficacy of Tall Man Lettering

Description

Currently, medical errors are one of the most common causes of death in the United
States (Makary & Daniel, 2016), which includes errors related to look-alike, sound-alike prescription drug name

Currently, medical errors are one of the most common causes of death in the United
States (Makary & Daniel, 2016), which includes errors related to look-alike, sound-alike prescription drug name confusion. The use of Tall Man lettering, a text enhancement style that capitalizes the dissimilar portions of words, has been recommended by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as well as the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) since 2008 in order to make it easier for healthcare professionals to distinguish and identify two otherwise easily confusable drug names. Research performed on the efficacy of Tall Man lettering and similar text enhancements in successfully differentiating look-alike, sound-alike drug names has thus far been either null or inconclusive. Therefore, it is crucial that further research be conducted in order to provide a path to alleviation by increasing the understanding of the problem, and providing evidence to a clearer solution (Lambert, Schroeder & Galanter, 2015). The objective of the current study was to measure the efficacy of Tall Man Lettering and additional text enhancement strategies through an experiment that replicates some of the previously used methods of research. The current study utilized a repeated measures design. Participants were shown a prime drug name, followed by a brief mask, and then either the same drug name or its confusable drug name pair. They were then asked to identify whether the two drug names presented were identical or different. All of the participants completed a total of four trials representing each condition (regular, Tall Man, Tall Man Bold, highlight) and a practice trial. Overall performance was measured through accuracy and reaction time, which revealed that regular, lowercase text was more effective than any of the other text enhancements, including Tall Man lettering, in quickly and accurately identifying differences in drug names. These results seem to add to the body of inconclusive research on the efficacy of Tall Man lettering and similar text enhancement strategies for reducing drug name confusion. Given the significant impact that drug name confusion errors can have on patient safety, it is imperative that further research be conducted in order to give a more definitive answer of whether text enhancement strategies like Tall Man lettering are helpful in practice.

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Date Created
  • 2019-05

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Equating user experience and Fitts law in gesture based input modalities

Description

The International Standards Organization (ISO) documentation utilizes Fitts’ law to determine the usability of traditional input devices like mouse and touchscreens for one- or two-dimensional operations. To test the hypothesis

The International Standards Organization (ISO) documentation utilizes Fitts’ law to determine the usability of traditional input devices like mouse and touchscreens for one- or two-dimensional operations. To test the hypothesis that Fitts’ Law can be applied to hand/air gesture based computing inputs, Fitts’ multi-directional target acquisition task is applied to three gesture based input devices that utilize different technologies and two baseline devices, mouse and touchscreen. Three target distances and three target sizes were tested six times in a randomized order with a randomized order of the five input technologies. A total of 81 participants’ data were collected for the within subjects design study. Participants were instructed to perform the task as quickly and accurately as possible according to traditional Fitts’ testing procedures. Movement time, error rate, and throughput for each input technology were calculated.

Additionally, no standards exist for equating user experience with Fitts’ measures such as movement time, throughput, and error count. To test the hypothesis that a user’s experience can be predicted using Fitts’ measures of movement time, throughput and error count, an ease of use rating using a 5-point scale for each input type was collected from each participant. The calculated Mean Opinion Scores (MOS) were regressed on Fitts’ measures of movement time, throughput, and error count to understand the extent to which they can predict a user’s subjective rating.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2015

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An airline pilot attitude evaluation: transportation security administration's federal flight deck officer program

Description

The Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) program was mandated legislatively, as part of the Homeland Security Act of 2002. This study replicated earlier research that investigated pilots’ opinions of the

The Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) program was mandated legislatively, as part of the Homeland Security Act of 2002. This study replicated earlier research that investigated pilots’ opinions of the current state of the FFDO program based on interviews. A Likert survey was created to allow simpler quantitative collection and analysis of opinions from large groups of pilots. A total of 43 airline pilots participated in this study. Responses to the Likert questions were compared with demographics, searching for significance through a Pearson chi-square test and frequencies were compared to earlier research findings. Significant chi-square results showed that those familiar with the program were more likely to agree the program should continue, it was effective, the screening and selection process of program applicants was adequate and the Federal Air Marshal Service’s management of the FFDO program was effective. Those with Military experience were more likely to disagree it was reasonable that FFDOs were required to pay for their own room and board during training or train on their own time. All those who shared an opinion agreed there should be a suggestion medium between FFDOs and their management. Unlike the prior study, all those familiar with the program agreed the weapons transportation and carriage procedures were adequate. Furthermore, all those who shared an opinion found the holster locking mechanism adequate, which was another reversal of opinion from the prior study. Similar to the prior study, pilots unanimously agree FFDOs were well trained and agreed that the program was effective and should continue.

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Date Created
  • 2017

The Role of Mediums in Distributed Learning

Description

The advancement of technology has transformed information consumption into an accessible and flexible process. The open learning ecosystem that exists online relies on self-direction. Learners are able to effectively fulfill

The advancement of technology has transformed information consumption into an accessible and flexible process. The open learning ecosystem that exists online relies on self-direction. Learners are able to effectively fulfill personal learning goals with preferred content forms, specifically by utilizing Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). It is essential to investigate the role of mediums in distributed learning to initiate human-centric design changes that best support the learner. This study provides insight into how choice influences self-learning and highlights the major engagement difficulties of MOOCs. Significant attrition was experienced while issuing text and audio material to participants for three weeks. Although this prevented valid statistical tests from being run, it was clear that text was the most desirable and effective medium. Students that read exhibited the highest comprehension levels and selected it as their de-facto consumption method even if audio was made available. Since this study involved complex topics, this supported the transient information effect. Future studies should focus deeply on the structure of online courses by implementing personable engagement features that improve overall participation rate.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Information architecture in vehicle infotainment displays

Description

This study exmaines the effect of in-vehicle infotainment display depth on driving performance. More features are being built into infotainment displays, allowing drivers to complete a greater number of secondary

This study exmaines the effect of in-vehicle infotainment display depth on driving performance. More features are being built into infotainment displays, allowing drivers to complete a greater number of secondary tasks while driving. However, the complexity of completing these tasks can take attention away from the primary task of driving, which may present safety risks. Tasks become more time consuming as the items drivers wish to select are buried deeper in a menu’s structure. Therefore, this study aims to examine how deeper display structures impact driving performance compared to more shallow structures.

Procedure. Participants complete a lead car following task, where they follow a lead car and attempt to maintain a time headway (TH) of 2 seconds behind the lead car at all times, while avoiding any collisions. Participants experience five conditions where they are given tasks to complete with an in-vehicle infotainment system. There are five conditions, each involving one of five displays with different structures: one-layer vertical, one-layer horizontal, two-layer vertical, two-layer horizontal, and three-layer. Brake Reaction Time (BRT), Mean Time Headway (MTH), Time Headway Variability (THV), and Time to Task Completion (TTC) are measured for each of the five conditions.

Results. There is a significant difference in MTH, THV, and TTC for the three-layer condition. There is a significant difference in BRT for the two-layer horizontal condition. There is a significant difference between one- and two-layer displays for all variables, BRT, MTH, THV, and TTC. There is also a significant difference between one- and three-layer displays for TTC.

Conclusions. Deeper displays negatively impact driving performance and make tasks more time consuming to complete while driving. One-layer displays appear to be optimal, although they may not be practical for in-vehicle displays.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018

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Understanding the Effect of Animation and its Speed on User Enjoyment

Description

Providing the user with good user experience is complex and involves multiple factors. One of the factors that can impact the user experience is animation. Animation can be tricky to

Providing the user with good user experience is complex and involves multiple factors. One of the factors that can impact the user experience is animation. Animation can be tricky to get right and needs to be understood by designers. Animations that are too fast might not accomplish anything and having them too slow could slow the user down causing them to get frustrated.

This study explores the subject of animation and its speed by trying to answer the following questions – 1) Do people notice whether an animation is present 2) Does animation affect the enjoyment of a transition? and 3) If animation does affect enjoyment, what is the effect of different animation speeds?

The study was conducted using 3 prototypes of an application to order bottled water in which the transitions between different brands of bottled water were animated at 0ms, 300ms and 650ms. A survey was conducted to see if the participants were able to spot any difference between the prototypes and if they did, which one they preferred.

It was found that most people did not recognize any difference between the prototypes. Even people who recognized a difference between the prototypes did not have any preference of speed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019

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Advance cues in soccer penalty kicks

Description

The study at hand investigated the effects of guidance and type of occlusion on the prediction of shot direction during a soccer penalty kick. Seventy participants took an online survey

The study at hand investigated the effects of guidance and type of occlusion on the prediction of shot direction during a soccer penalty kick. Seventy participants took an online survey where they had to guess the direction of a penalty kick from the perspective of a goalkeeper. Half the participants were placed in a group where they had access to tips on what to look for, while the other group had no tips provided. Participants were shown videos in which the penalty shooter had their upper body covered or their lower body covered. Participants had 30 seconds to decide what side the ball was going to, right or left. Results showed that there is no significant between the two groups in terms of judgment accuracy. The group that received no guidance and had the kicker's lower body covered was the group with the highest average score, 50.44%. The findings may help future studies that focus on what material is taught to goalkeepers in a classroom setting and the role of occlusion during free kicks outside the 18-yard box.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019