Matching Items (26)

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A Collaboration Between Mission of Mercy and the Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) Program T. Denny Sanford School of Social and Family Dynamics, Arizona State University

Description

Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) partnered with Mission of Mercy, a faith-based nonprofit organization that provides free medical care services to uninsured and underinsured individuals throughout the Phoenix valley. A

Community Action Research Experiences (CARE) partnered with Mission of Mercy, a faith-based nonprofit organization that provides free medical care services to uninsured and underinsured individuals throughout the Phoenix valley. A needs assessment was conducted on Mission of Mercy's patient population and data collected over a two month long period, in which 91 completed surveys were collected. Participants were between the ages of 18 to over 65 and were largely Hispanic/Latino, followed by White/Anglo and Black/African American. The results indicate that there is need for increased patient education which could be satisfied by implement an incentive program. A need for a program specific to high blood pressure was also found. Participants were interested in dental services being offered, a service that is currently not offered through the Arizona chapter of Mission of Mercy. The study also showed that respondents were satisfied with the level of care received at Mission of Mercy.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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A Dynamic Model of Marital Conflict and Socioemotional Development in Children

Description

Although it is typically a normal family process, marital conflict that is not managed in a healthy way can lead to disruptions in the family system. Because approximately 46% of

Although it is typically a normal family process, marital conflict that is not managed in a healthy way can lead to disruptions in the family system. Because approximately 46% of marriages end in divorce (U.S. Center for Disease Control, 2017), a literature review was conducted to better understand the complex relationship between marital conflict and socioemotional development in children. The current study focused on multiple phases in the family system: (1) the transition to parenthood, (2) early childhood, (3) middle childhood, and (4) adolescence. The review found that marital conflict and socioemotional development in children have bidirectional effects within developmental periods. By studying marital conflict and socioemotional development in children in these various stages of life, the thesis identified gaps in both the literature and our understanding of how these processes may have short- and long-term impacts on one another. I propose the Marital Conflict and Socio-Emotional Child Development (MCSECD) Dynamic to provide a more detailed explanation of the complex relationship between marital conflict and socioemotional development in children. To better improve the health and stability of the family system moving forward, I suggest that this complex dynamic be taken into account when implementing preventative and interventional marriage and family therapies.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Parenting Information Across Socioeconomic Status

Description

My project examined the different types of parenting information parents and caregivers use. And how useful, accurate, accessible, and likely to use these types of parenting information are. I also

My project examined the different types of parenting information parents and caregivers use. And how useful, accurate, accessible, and likely to use these types of parenting information are. I also examined these differences across SES to see if there were any variances.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2021-05

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Ambivalent Sexism in College Women: Key Beliefs and Outcomes

Description

Gender discrimination and inequality in this day and age points to the existence of ambivalent sexist beliefs. That is, men and women hold outwardly negative or superficially positive sexist beliefs

Gender discrimination and inequality in this day and age points to the existence of ambivalent sexist beliefs. That is, men and women hold outwardly negative or superficially positive sexist beliefs about the innate inferiority of women (Glick & Fiske, 1996; Glick & Fiske, 1997). In the past twenty years, outcomes and effects of women due to these beliefs have been researched extensively. Less common are suggestions or conclusions regarding the underlying existence of these beliefs, though many researchers have related their results to aspects within the Social Identity Theory (1979) and other alike theories involving the self and threats to self. The present study looks at smaller constructs, reporting a relationship between a model of women's identity, including predictors: 1) closeness to women, 2) public regard 3) gender identity centrality, to hostile, benevolent and ambivalent sexist beliefs. A group of N=115 women with ages ranging from 18 to 22 at Arizona State University were administered a survey asking questions about their sexist beliefs and their personal gender values. Results show a significant relationship between predictor variables to hostile sexist beliefs, but not benevolent sexist beliefs. These findings suggest that women's association with their gender-derived identity may parallel with endorsement of sexist beliefs when conceptions of the traditional woman is more salient.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-05

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A Twin Study Approach to Toddler Mental Health: Maternal Depression, Discipline Practices, and Hispanic Ethnicity

Description

We examined the relations between maternal depression, discipline practices, and toddler mental health outcomes, specifically competence and total problem behavior. Ethnicity was considered as a moderator in all analyses. For

We examined the relations between maternal depression, discipline practices, and toddler mental health outcomes, specifically competence and total problem behavior. Ethnicity was considered as a moderator in all analyses. For the first time, ethnicity was considered as a moderator of the heritability of toddler competence and total problem behavior. The data came from the Arizona Twin Project. A subsample containing only Caucasian (66%) and Hispanic (34%; 87% of Mexican descent) participants was used. Primary caregivers (>95% mothers) reported on levels of maternal depression, discipline practices, and their twins' competency and problem behaviors. It was hypothesized that maternal depression would be associated with less competency and more problem behaviors in toddlers; inductive discipline practices would be associated with higher competency and fewer problem behaviors; and punitive discipline practices would be associated with lower competency and more problem behaviors. Ethnicity was predicted to moderate only the relation between discipline practices and toddler mental health. Consistent with predictions, maternal depression predicted less competency and more problem behaviors, and inductive discipline predicted higher competency and fewer problem behaviors, while punitive discipline predicted lower competency and more problem behaviors. Ethnicity moderated the relation between maternal depression at 12 months and total problem behaviors. The heritability of competence and total problem behavior varied across the Caucasian and Hispanic samples.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Process Evaluation of Employee Implementation of Action Programs

Description

The Community Action Research Experiences program integrates the research and teaching mission of Arizona State University by providing services to the community by fostering professional and leadership development of students.

The Community Action Research Experiences program integrates the research and teaching mission of Arizona State University by providing services to the community by fostering professional and leadership development of students. It is hoped that the results of the collaborations with CARE will serve to further an organization's goals and effectiveness. VALLEYLIFE (VL) is a non-profit organization striving to help people with disabilities. VL develops Action Programs for each of its clients, whom they call members, to improve their independent or social skills. Examples of programs that members may work on include tasks such as computer training, visual arts, or writing. VALLEYLIFE lacked the data to evaluate if the developed and implemented Action Programs are properly carried out by the staff in ways that are beneficial to members. Given the problem, this research project sought to conduct a process evaluation of the staff regarding their implementation of the Action Programs. This involved observations of employee-member interactions in performing the Action Programs and an interview of staff measuring their preparedness and confidence in performing the program and their feelings of the programs and how things are run. This research provided the following implications to VALLEYLIFE. VL might consider performing periodic observations and reviews of the program implementation to monitor quality. VL may consider involving staff in program development and revision to create programs that better serve members. VL may consider generating ideas for how they may cooperate when a peer is struggling to keep up with events that happen through the day in the interest of better serving the members. Overall, employees are doing well as they are efficient in carrying out the written programs during program time. They are comfortable with what they are doing, use time effectively, and do their best to help the members. There is always room for improvement however and by considering some of the implications mentioned, VALLEYLIFE and their employees may be able to take action that may hold potential for further improvements in effectiveness.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2013-05

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Item Analysis of the Late Adolescent Home Observation for Measure of the Environment Inventory

Description

This thesis was an analysis of items in the Late Adolescent Home Observation for Measure of the Environment (LA HOME) after the first wave of N = 138 interviews. The

This thesis was an analysis of items in the Late Adolescent Home Observation for Measure of the Environment (LA HOME) after the first wave of N = 138 interviews. The purpose of this project was to learn how to utilize a statistical software such as SPSS to analyze items and interpret results. Frequency analysis, inter-rater reliability (IRR), correlation analysis, internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha, and feedback from research assistants were considered when deciding which items should be eliminated from the measure. After running these analyses, ten items were suggested for deletion including: clean, adolescent's room allows for privacy, reference materials, news, family encourages adolescent to think independently, community service, parent knows where adolescent spends time, weekly household responsibilities, school/career planning, and dentist. Future interviews generating a larger sample size as well as discussions and subsequent revisions to the manual will clarify additional items that may be eliminated from the final version of the instrument.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015-05

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Parenting and the decline of physical activity from age 9 to 15

Description

Background
There is a rapid decline in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during middle childhood and adolescence. Information on the environmental factors implicated in this decline is limited. This study focuses

Background
There is a rapid decline in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during middle childhood and adolescence. Information on the environmental factors implicated in this decline is limited. This study focuses on family factors associated with the rate of decline in objectively measured physical activity during middle childhood and adolescence.
Methods
Longitudinal analysis of 801 participants from 10 US sites in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development whose data included accelerometer-determined levels of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) between ages 9 and 15 years, as well as family process, BMI and demographic information. The sample included an even split of boys (49%) and girls (51%), was predominantly white (77%), and contained about 26% low income and 19% single parent families. The outcome measure was mean MVPA. It was based on 4 to 7 days of monitored physical activity.
Results
Boys with lower parental monitoring scores and more days of parental encouragement had significantly more minutes of MVPA at age 9 years. The effect of parental monitoring, however, was moderated by early puberty. High parental monitoring was associated with decreased activity levels for boys experiencing later puberty and increased activity for boy experiencing early puberty. Minutes of MVPA for boys living in the Midwest decreased at significantly faster rates than boys living in any other region; and boys in the South declined faster than boys in the West. Girls in the Midwest and South declined faster than girls in the West and Northeast. Among girls, more days of parental exercise and transportation to activities were associated with more MVPA per day at age 9. However, more parental transportation to activities and less monitoring was associated with faster linear declines in daughters' MVPA between the ages of 9 and 15 years. For girls who experienced puberty early, parental encouragement was associated with more MVPA.
Conclusions
Parenting processes, such as monitoring and encouragement, as well as the parents' own level of physical activity, showed significant, but small, gender-specific associations with MVPA levels at age nine and the linear rate of decline in MVPA between ages 9 and 15.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2011-04-15

HOME ENVIRONMENTS OF INFANTS FROM IMMIGRANT FAMILIES IN THE UNITED STATES: FINDINGS FROM THE NEW IMMIGRANT SURVEY

Description

Data from the New Immigrant Survey were used to describe the home environments of 638 children ages birth to three whose parents legally immigrated to the United States. Thirty-two indicators

Data from the New Immigrant Survey were used to describe the home environments of 638 children ages birth to three whose parents legally immigrated to the United States. Thirty-two indicators of home conditions were clustered into 4 domains: discipline and socioemotional support, learning materials, enriching experiences, and family activities. Results revealed variation in how frequently infants from every country (Mexico, El Salvador, India, Philippines) and region (East Asia, Europe, Caribbean, Africa) studied experienced each home environmental condition. There were differences between countries and regions on many indicators as well as differences based on parents’ level of education. The experiences documented for children of recent legal immigrants were similar to those documented for children of native-born families in other studies.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2014-11-01

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The Effects of Mental Health and Familial Support on Childhood Cancer Patients

Description

Children with cancer can experience decreased emotional health along with deteriorating
physical health compared to children without cancer. Many studies have been done to examine the effects of emotional distress

Children with cancer can experience decreased emotional health along with deteriorating
physical health compared to children without cancer. Many studies have been done to examine the effects of emotional distress and mental health on the cancer patient, as well as the role of familial support. It was found that children with cancer may suffer from depression, anxiety, PTSD, and socio-emotional problems as a result of the trauma of being diagnosed and treated for a pervasive, life-threatening disease. Late effects may also worsen co-morbid mental health disorders. Childhood cancer patients who experience co-morbid mental health problems of depression and anxiety end up having a longer duration of recovery, as well as a worsened outcome than others with a single disorder (Massie, 2004). It was also shown that family members are affected emotionally and mentally from dealing with childhood cancer. Not only is the cancer patient at risk for PTSD during or after treatment, but also family members (National Cancer Institute, 2015). Siblings of the child with cancer may experience feelings of loneliness, fear, and anxiety, as the parent’s attention is focused on the child suffering with cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute (2015), familial problems can affect the child’s ability to adjust to the diagnosis and treatment in a positive way. However, children with strong familial and social support adjust easier to living with cancer. A common theme found in literature is that regular mental health checkups during and after cancer treatment is important for quality of life. Therefore, it is important for all childhood cancer patients and their families to receive information about mental health awareness, as well as therapeutic interventions that are developed for families caring for a child with cancer.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05