Matching Items (4)

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Assisted Cycle Therapy (ACT) Did Not Improve Depression in Older Adults with Down Syndrome

Description

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) on depression in older adults with Down Syndrome (DS). We predicted that older adults with

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of Assisted Cycling Therapy (ACT) on depression in older adults with Down Syndrome (DS). We predicted that older adults with Down Syndrome would see an improvement in their depressive symptoms after ACT and Voluntary Cycling (VC). However, we predicted there would be a greater improvement in depressive symptoms after ACT in comparison to VC. Depression was measured using a modified version of the Children's Depression Inventory 2 (CDI 2) due to the low mental age of our participant population. Twenty-one older adults with DS were randomly assigned to one of three interventions, which took place over an eight-week period of time. Eleven older adults with DS completed the ACT intervention, which is stationary cycling on a recumbent bicycle with the assistance of a motor to maintain a cadence at least 35% greater than the rate of voluntary cycling. Nine participants completed the voluntary cycling intervention, where they cycled at a cadence of their choosing. One participant composed our no cycling control group. No intervention group reached results that achieved a conventional level of significance. However, there was a trend for depression to increase after 8 weeks throughout all three intervention groups. We did see a slightly slower regression of depression in the ACT group than the VC and control. Our results were discussed with respect to social and cognitive factors relevant to older adults with DS and the subjective nature of the CDI2. This study brings attention to the lack of accurate measures and standardized research methods created for populations with intellectual disabilities in regards to research.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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Does high intensity interval treadmill walking improve upper extremity function in chronic stroke survivors?

Description

This study examined upper extremity function, including manual dexterity, in chronic stroke survivors following a 10-week high intensity interval treadmill walking intervention. Six stroke survivors completed two 35-minute high intensity

This study examined upper extremity function, including manual dexterity, in chronic stroke survivors following a 10-week high intensity interval treadmill walking intervention. Six stroke survivors completed two 35-minute high intensity interval treadmill walking sessions based on ventilatory threshold per week. In addition, each participant completed one 30-minute low-intensity walking session at home. Participants completed upper extremity and manual dexterity testing at baseline, acutely, and after the 10-week intervention. Contrary to the prediction made, significant improvements in both paretic and non-paretic upper-extremity function including manual dexterity were not found. While time to complete the Nine Hole Peg Test (9HPB) somewhat decreased and the number of blocks transferred in the Box and Blocks Test (BBT) slightly increased, results were not found to be statistically significant. The results do suggest, nonetheless, that high intensity interval treadmill training may lead to improvements in upper extremity function and potentially daily living in chronic stroke survivors.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-05

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VO2max Testing in Chronic Stroke Survivors

Description

The maximal amount of oxygen a person’s body can use while exercising is their VO2max. It is important to test VO2max in chronic stroke survivors who experience stroke-related deficits. The

The maximal amount of oxygen a person’s body can use while exercising is their VO2max. It is important to test VO2max in chronic stroke survivors who experience stroke-related deficits. The American College of Sports Medicine defines criteria for determining if a VO2max was reached. These criteria appear not to be applicable for this population. We explored an alternative set of criteria that appears more appropriate. Criteria for VO2max testing post-stroke should be further tested and defined.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2020-05

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Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Cognition in Adults 3 Months or More Post-Stroke: A Meta-Analysis

Description

Background and Purpose— There is limited conclusive data on both pharmacological and holistic treatment options to improve cognition in adults after stroke. In particular, there is lacking evidence for cognitive

Background and Purpose— There is limited conclusive data on both pharmacological and holistic treatment options to improve cognition in adults after stroke. In particular, there is lacking evidence for cognitive rehabilitation in the subacute and chronic phases when cognitive impairment may be more perceptible. In this meta-analytic review, our primary objective was to determine the cognitive effects of aerobic exercise on post-stroke adults in the post-acute phases. Secondary objectives were to investigate the differential effects of aerobic exercise on sub-domains of cognitive function.
Methods— Data were extracted and filtered from electronic databases PubMed (MEDLINE), CINAHL, Embase, PsycINFO, and Scopus. Intervention effects were represented by Hedges’ g and combined into pooled effect sizes using random effects models. Heterogeneity was evaluated using the Chi-squared (Q) and I-squared statistics.
Results— Five studies met inclusion criteria, representing data from 182 participants. The primary analysis produced a positive overall effect of aerobic exercise on cognitive performance (Hedges’ g [95% confidence interval]= 0.42 [0.007–0.77]). Effects were significantly different from zero for aerobic interventions combined with other physical activity interventions (Hedges’ g [CI] =0.59 [0.26 to 0.92]), but not for aerobic interventions alone (P= 0.40). In specific subdomains, positive moderate effects were found for global cognitive function (Hedges’ g [CI] =0.79 [0.31 to 1.26]) but not for attention and processing speed (P=0.08), executive function (P= 0.84), and working memory (P=0.92).
Conclusions— We determined that aerobic exercise combined with other modes of training produced a significant positive effect on cognition in adults after stroke in the subacute and chronic phases. Our analysis supports the use of combined training as a treatment option to enhance long-term cognitive function in adults after stroke. Further research is needed to determine the efficacy of aerobic training alone.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2019-05