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Beyond Books: The Importance of Inclusive and Accessible Library Spaces

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Libraries have historical and contemporary importance as public spaces that serve a purpose beyond storing books. In our thesis project, we wanted to ensure that the ASU Library was fulfilling this role for our student community. Based on a survey

Libraries have historical and contemporary importance as public spaces that serve a purpose beyond storing books. In our thesis project, we wanted to ensure that the ASU Library was fulfilling this role for our student community. Based on a survey of 136 members of the Arizona State University community regarding accessibility of the Libraries, the results found that the ASU Library system could benefit from more accessible and digital content and programming. In response to our findings, we created a digital book display which highlighted resources about critical disability studies, the importance of community spaces and libraries in particular, as well as information about universal design. This book display serves as an example of what the future of book displays could be and how to create inclusive spaces in the university Library system.

"Access the project here: https://libguides.asu.edu/BeyondBooks"

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Date Created
2020-12

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The Emergence and Evolution of Gendered Products in America

Description

Gendered products are prevalent in the modern consumer products market. This paper provides historical context for the change in the consumer products market which started as a genderless product market and shifted to a female consumer-centric market reflecting the economic

Gendered products are prevalent in the modern consumer products market. This paper provides historical context for the change in the consumer products market which started as a genderless product market and shifted to a female consumer-centric market reflecting the economic needs of the United States through World War I and II. This female consumer-centric market results from the rise of consumer research and many household products are created to satisfy female consumer preferences. But as the consumer demographics change with more women entering the labor force, the types of products being sold change to appeal to the increasing number of male consumers who begin shopping for themselves. This increase in male products is what leads to the booming men's personal care products market that we see today. With an increase in gendered products, there has also been an increase in the number of backlash companies face for creating specific gendered products. This paper outlines the history of gendered products and the potential future of products in the United States.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Rebuit: Encouraging Stability and a Sense of Home for Those Who have been Displaced

Description

Rebuilt is a project that looks to understand what Syrian refugees experience in camps, specifically Za'atari, the world's largest Syrian camp. The intent of Rebuilt was to create a product that would help their living conditions. By applying Design Thinking

Rebuilt is a project that looks to understand what Syrian refugees experience in camps, specifically Za'atari, the world's largest Syrian camp. The intent of Rebuilt was to create a product that would help their living conditions. By applying Design Thinking & Process, Rebuilt ultimately yielded a room partition system to help improve the living conditions of refugees. To design a product for a world most of the world is ignorant of, research is paramount. Research for Rebuilt involved gather many facts from various international databases, such as UNHCR and Mercy Corps. By understanding the demographics, the culture, and needs, Rebuilt was able to focus on some key points that lead to a potential design project: over half of the camp is consisted of adolescents (under age 18), and are living in small, essentially shipping-container homes, and the environment of the Jordanian desert where the camp is situated is extremely variable between freezing winters and blistering summers. Looking over the resources provided by humanitarian organizations, Rebuilt pinpointed a missing niche product that could help the living conditions of refugee's lives: a room partition system that could regulate ambient temperatures. The need for private space is important for the development of a refugee adolescent as it encourages stability and a sense of home. Ambient temperature is also vastly important for the productivity and health of anyone. Rebuilt is consisted of two main parts: the design of a bracket that could be used to accommodate the widths of multiple building materials and would be cheap to manufacture, and a pre-made panel that incorporated the use of phase-change-material technology. The design process is documented with a finalized design that should be low-cost and light-weight to ship from manufacturers to those in need.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Theorizing the 21st Century City: Urban Design through the SETS Framework

Description

As the move towards sustainable urbanism grows, understanding how the city has previously been envisioned and designed will be useful to moving forward. This work examines the legacy of urban design theories, what these theories have implied about what the

As the move towards sustainable urbanism grows, understanding how the city has previously been envisioned and designed will be useful to moving forward. This work examines the legacy of urban design theories, what these theories have implied about what the city should be, and their sustainability consequences. Noticing three prominent urban design visions of the city, the technological city (as proposed in 1922 by Le Corbusier's Ville contemporaine and later in 1933 by his Ville Radieuse (The Radiant City), and in 1935 by Frank Lloyd Wright's' Broadacre City), the social city (as explored in 1961 by Jane Jacobs and in 1976 by Edward Relph of the University of Chicago), and the ecological city (as expounded upon in 1924 by both Lewis Mumford and in 1969 by Ian McHarg), I have newly applied the social-ecological-technical systems framework (SETS) to help classify and analyze these urban design theories and how they have mixed to create hybrid perspectives in more recent urban design theory. Lastly, I have proposed an urban design theory that envisions the sustainable city as an ongoing process. Hopefully, this vision that will hopefully be useful to the future of sustainable development in cities, as will a more organized understanding of urban design theories and their sustainability outcomes.

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Created

Date Created
2018-05

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Bridge: Embracing the Elderly with Empathetic Design

Description

Bridge is a device that relieves anxiety for people who care for the elderly. It has the face of the analog watch and the inner workings of a smart watch which analyzes the elderly person’s movement to track and

Bridge is a device that relieves anxiety for people who care for the elderly. It has the face of the analog watch and the inner workings of a smart watch which analyzes the elderly person’s movement to track and recognize patterns. The caretaker has an app on their phone that alerts them when the elderly person breaks an activity pattern which also allows them to quickly and easily communicate with the elderly person to check on them. Bridge also holds the elderly person's personal medical history to allow medical professionals to provide them with better care in the case of an emergency.

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Created

Date Created
2019-05

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Re-imagining Rio Salado's Sensory Experience: Restorative Design Promoting Sensory and Healing Environments for Children with Sensory Processing Disorder

Description

This project focuses on providing a series of Sensory Design Guidelines (SDG) for the creation of restorative environments for people and nature promoting cognitive health, motor skill development, and outdoor therapy for urban society’s most vulnerable. Although the project framework

This project focuses on providing a series of Sensory Design Guidelines (SDG) for the creation of restorative environments for people and nature promoting cognitive health, motor skill development, and outdoor therapy for urban society’s most vulnerable. Although the project framework is structured around guidelines for the creation of spaces specifically designed for children with Sensory Processing Disorder, it is not restricted to that specific application. Guidelines are further developed structured around inclusive and universal design approaches.

The project is divided into four sections. The first section explores what Sensory Processing Disorder is, how Occupational Therapy with Sensory Integration positively impacts healing processes, and how designers can expand this processing into the natural healing environment of the great outdoors in a toxic and urbanized world. The second section discusses the vision, goals and objectives for implementation of Sensory Design Guidelines as discussed in the third section. And finally, the fourth section provides a conceptual example of what SDG would look like when applied to a physical site along a natural corridor in a densely urbanized landscape.

The final example of SDG implementation is applied to a site along the Salt River (Rio Salado) Corridor in Phoenix, Arizona. The Corridor is the subject of a coordinated inter-agency public/private restoration initiative spanning more than fifty-five miles along the Salt River that has been strongly supported by former U.S. Senator John McCain and greatly influenced by active involvement from Arizona State University students. The designated example site is designed as one site to be utilized in a larger network of easily accessible Sensory sites, each to be designed with a different approach to sensory development, as well as variation in challenges based on age and sensory abilities. Guidelines are intended to work in conjunction with future local projects promoting social and ecological growth and wellbeing, such as the Phoenix site is intended to work in conjunction with future Rio Re-imagined projects.

The findings, guidelines, and examples provided throughout the paper are focused on re-inventing the relationship between the built and natural environments in the urbanized landscape into one of daily nature-engagement and can be applied to any group living within an urban setting. By designing for society’s most vulnerable populations, design application benefits not only the individual, but creates a resilient, healthy environment for the entire urban population today, and for future generations.

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Date Created
2019-05

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Universal Design: NASA ASU Psyche Application

Description

In early 2026, the NASA Discovery Program will fall into orbit with a metal asteroid named Psyche. Through discovery and interaction, this exploration will give us insight into an asteroid that we cannot see or interpret. From a certain view,

In early 2026, the NASA Discovery Program will fall into orbit with a metal asteroid named Psyche. Through discovery and interaction, this exploration will give us insight into an asteroid that we cannot see or interpret. From a certain view, you can look at how this mission mimics that discovery with experimentation of our own senses. As a part of a team of eight seniors, we were tasked to help develop a mobile application that reflects the Psyche mission and shows the future of the project ten years from now. Since this is also a government funded project, it is pertinent to adhere to the ADA compliance guidelines required to make digital applications accessible to the larger public. As a designer, I wanted to push this concept further to showcase that accessibility is not something that should be stereotyped or discouraged from a design perspective. Each person that interacts with the application will have a different experience but it is this collaboration between the object and it's audience that creates this sense of discovery. Taking the mission's core values one step further, this application was designed and explored to uphold the foundations of what Universal Design is about. It is about connecting interested parties to the material they are looking for without unrealistic access that is dependent on ability.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Prevalence of Anxiety Disorders in the Creative Industry

Description

Everyone experiences feelings of anxiety. This is part of being human. However, occasional stress and worry does not compare with today's rising epidemic of Anxiety Disorders, especially in the creative industry. A widespread stigma surrounding mental health, our high-stress culture,

Everyone experiences feelings of anxiety. This is part of being human. However, occasional stress and worry does not compare with today's rising epidemic of Anxiety Disorders, especially in the creative industry. A widespread stigma surrounding mental health, our high-stress culture, and rising medical costs leaves most of those suffering without treatment. Those that end up seeking treatment face the challenge of finding the right combination, to bring their overpowering anxiety down to a manageable level. The most common treatments include therapy, medication, and lifestyle changes. Alternative treatments such as meditation, exercise, and self-care have a great impact on reducing anxiety when combined with traditional treatments. Despite the fact that anxiety has become a cultural condition, we can end this epidemic by speaking up and offering the right support, often off the beaten path.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Active Architecture: A Form of Architecture that Adapts and Reacts to Challenges Accordingly and Actively, to Challenges Introduced and Forces Presented by Landslides

Description

This research and design project proposes an active (resilient/adaptive) architecture to address the problem of natural disasters in developing communities. Natural disasters are the outcome created when mankind stops listening and learning to the surrounding environment. They are like any

This research and design project proposes an active (resilient/adaptive) architecture to address the problem of natural disasters in developing communities. Natural disasters are the outcome created when mankind stops listening and learning to the surrounding environment. They are like any other natural hazard created by the environment, or human activity, the only difference is that natural disasters are destructive, claiming lives and damaging economies of affected areas. Research shows that it is more expensive for a community to recover from a disaster than it is to prevent it from happening in the first place or trying to prevent factors that might increase fatality. Therefore, rather than dealing with the after-effects, this project proposes solutions for the prevention of the adverse effects of natural disasters during the process of building rural communities \u2014 to better adapt for those events. Furthermore, research has shown that natural disasters have little power in taking lives and weakening economies alone. In his book, 2000 Years of Mayan Literature, Professor of Anthropology Dennis Tedlock, explains that many historical civilizations collapsed in part due to the inadequate relationship between society and the environmental conditions upon which societies rely. He compares this situation with our own, pointing to the parallel between the isolation of Easter Island, set apart by the vast wastes of the Pacific Ocean, with the isolation of the Earth in space. Tedlock's statement remains relevant in our time, yet mankind still turns a blind eye, and together with unprepared infrastructure, natural disasters can become exceedingly devastating and have long-term destructive effects. Active Architecture is the form of architecture that adapts to challenges and reacts to them accordingly and repeatedly, according to challenges introduces and forces present. Architecture plays a huge role in how natural disasters are dealt handled. In an interview with Arbuckle Industries, architect and humanitarian Shigeru Ban argues that natural disasters are manmade. He says that the earthquake alone cannot kill a person, the collapse of a building does. The actions of mankind are implicit in the massive destruction when a disaster occurs. Ban stresses it is the responsibility of an architect to make safe spaces. My proposal is that safe spaces can be created through active architecture. One example of active architecture is the civilization created by the people of Badjao, a 21st-century sea people. They are a relevant case study in my research because of their five (5) core technics in creating their active architecture: 1) architecture can be collective initiative, 2) adaptability goes beyond the building, 3) successful design can be born from fragility instead of stability, 4) listen to their environment, and 5) use surroundings and ecological impact as the defining qualities of their work in the long-term. In this paper, I will discuss the techniques of active architecture through a study of natural disasters in the form of landslides that occur often in my native country, Rwanda. Landslides, floods, droughts and heavy rain all routinely affect the country, however, landslides are the most urgent problem to be dealt with. In the final section of my paper, I use my research to develop an architectural solution to the issue of landslides in Rwanda and I project what the future of the country could look like if the proposal is implemented. The proposal describes a more active form of architecture that is responsive to the site and offers a resilient yet solid infrastructural solution to the problem of landslides.

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Date Created
2018-05

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Community Gardening and Learning

Description

The goal of this creative thesis is to construct and implement an outdoor learning environment for the students who currently attend AIM's homework club. The project is underway and will be undergoing construction over the next few months.

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Date Created
2018-05