Matching Items (5)

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IN SYNC: A CYBERPSYCHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF EDELMAN DIGITAL EXAMINING ITS DEVELOPMENT OF CONSUMER TRUST, LOYALTY AND INFORMATION DISSEMINATION

Description

Since the inception of the World Wide Web in the late 1980s, public relations firms and their clients have benefited from a valuable platform allowing for instant and global communication.

Since the inception of the World Wide Web in the late 1980s, public relations firms and their clients have benefited from a valuable platform allowing for instant and global communication. Essential social engagement tools such as trust, loyalty and information dissemination have been transferred from a physical, non-mediated environment to a virtual, technology mediated one. Therefore, it is now vital that public relations practitioners understand the emerging field of cyberpsychology and the important elements that nurture e-Trust, e-Loyalty and Positive Virality. Through qualitative research methods, e-Trust, e-Loyalty and Positive Virality are comprehensively and conceptually defined. Each is also operationally defined in terms of number of users, number of followers and number of tweets, shares or media impressions. A Cyber-Success Model is proposed as a way to explain how these three digital components may work together to achieve a high degree of public engagement. The specific conceptual and operational criteria as well as the Cyber-Success Model are then used to evaluate public engagement with regard to Edelman Digital campaigns executed for clients PayPal and Ebay as examples of how the model is applied. Conclusions and future recommendations for Edelman Digital, the field of public relations and the field of cyberpsychology are discussed.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2014-12

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Analysis of the Aftereffects of Terror Attacks on Social Media

Description

Social media has become a direct and effective means of transmitting personal opinions into the cyberspace. The use of certain key-words and their connotations in tweets portray a meaning that

Social media has become a direct and effective means of transmitting personal opinions into the cyberspace. The use of certain key-words and their connotations in tweets portray a meaning that goes beyond the screen and affects behavior. During terror attacks or worldwide crises, people turn to social media as a means of managing their anxiety, a mechanism of Terror Management Theory (TMT). These opinions have distinct impacts on the emotions that people express both online and offline through both positive and negative sentiments. This paper focuses on using sentiment analysis on twitter hash-tags during five major terrorist attacks that created a significant response on social media, which collectively show the effects that 140-character tweets have on perceptions in social media. The purpose of analyzing the sentiments of tweets after terror attacks allows for the visualization of the effect of key-words and the possibility of manipulation by the use of emotional contagion. Through sentiment analysis, positive, negative and neutral emotions were portrayed in the tweets. The keywords detected also portray characteristics about terror attacks which would allow for future analysis and predictions in regards to propagating a specific emotion on social media during future crisis.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

Parenting in the Digital Age

Description

According to a 2016 National Cyber Security Alliance survey, "30 percent of teens say their parents are 'not aware at all' or 'not very aware' of their online activities while

According to a 2016 National Cyber Security Alliance survey, "30 percent of teens say their parents are 'not aware at all' or 'not very aware' of their online activities while 57 percent of parents surveyed admit that they are similarly in the dark about what their kids are doing online." The Parenting in the Digital Age project (parentingdigitalage.com) aims to provide parents of high schoolers with information about the effects of internet and social media use on their children, as well as information on specific websites and apps their children are using. The goal of the project is to combine cyberpsychology research with journalistic techniques to create an informative, user-friendly website. Parents deserve clear and concise resources to help navigate parenting in the digital age, and this website will serve as one.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2016-12

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Romantic Breakup Distress: A Snapchat Story

Description

Since the advent of social media, researchers have studied how platforms like Facebook and Instagram can influence our relationships, and more specifically, how social networking sites can impact what happens

Since the advent of social media, researchers have studied how platforms like Facebook and Instagram can influence our relationships, and more specifically, how social networking sites can impact what happens when these relationships dissolve. Less is known about the newer platform Snapchat, which provides ephemeral updates as they occur to one's friend list, as well as self-destructing direct messages between individuals. The present study utilized survey responses from 84 college-aged individuals and eight semi-structured, in-depth interviews to study the relationship between using Snapchat to engage with or monitor one's ex-partner, the level of distress that results from these behaviors, and an individual's overall breakup distress level. A significant positive correlation was found between each of these variables, indicating that remaining connected with one's ex-partner on Snapchat may contribute to one's level of distress, or alternatively, that more distressed individuals are turning to Snapchat to monitor their ex-partner. Pairing this quantitative data with in-depth interviews allowed for more robust and generalizable findings. Qualitative details supported the statistical analysis to indicate that one's overall breakup distress level may be leading individuals to use Snapchat to monitor their ex-partner or exaggerate their own speed of recovery. Future research should analyze these same variables in a larger, more representative sample by following couples as their breakups occur in real-time to capture more comprehensive participant experiences.

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Created

Date Created
  • 2018-05

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We are legion: hacktivism as a product of deindividuation, power, and social injustice

Description

The current study examines the role that context plays in hackers' perceptions of the risks and payoffs characterizing a hacktivist attack. Hacktivism (i.e., hacking to convey a moral, ethical, or

The current study examines the role that context plays in hackers' perceptions of the risks and payoffs characterizing a hacktivist attack. Hacktivism (i.e., hacking to convey a moral, ethical, or social justice message) is examined through a general game theoretic framework as a product of costs and benefits, as well as the contextual cues that may sway hackers' estimations of each. In two pilot studies, a bottom-up approach is utilized to identify the key motives underlying (1) past attacks affiliated with a major hacktivist group, Anonymous, and (2) popular slogans utilized by Anonymous in its communication with members, targets, and broader society. Three themes emerge from these analyses, namely: (1) the prevalence of first-person plural pronouns (i.e., we, our) in Anonymous slogans; (2) the prevalence of language inducing status or power; and (3) the importance of social injustice in triggering Anonymous activity. The present research therefore examines whether these three contextual factors activate participants' (1) sense of deindividuation, or the loss of an individual's personal self in the context of a group or collective; and (2) motive for self-serving power or society-serving social justice. Results suggest that participants' estimations of attack likelihood stemmed solely from expected payoffs, rather than their interplay with subjective risks. As expected, the use of we language led to a decrease in subjective risks, possibly due to primed effects of deindividuation. In line with game theory, the joint appearance of both power and justice motives resulted in (1) lower subjective risks, (2) higher payoffs, and (3) higher attack likelihood overall. Implications for policymakers and the understanding and prevention of hacktivism are discussed, as are the possible ramifications of deindividuation and power for the broader population of Internet users around the world.

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Agent

Created

Date Created
  • 2015